SUMMARY ô A Clockwork Orange

CHARACTERS A Clockwork Orange

A vicious fifteen year old droog is the central character of this 1963 classic In Anthony Burgess's nightmare vision of the future where criminals take over after dark the story is told by the central character Al A Clockwork Orange is one of those books which everyone has heard of but which few people have actually read – mostly I think because it is preceded by a reputation of shocking ultra violence I’m not going to deny here that the book contains violence It features lengthy descriptions of heinous crimes and they’re vivid descriptions full of excitement Burgess later wrote in his autobiography ‘I was sickened by my own excitement at setting it down’ Yet it does not glorify violence nor is it a book about violence per se Rather it’s an exploration of the morality of free will Of whether it is better to choose to be bad than to be conditioned to be good Of alienation and how to deal with the excesses to which such alienation may lead And ultimately of one man’s decision to say goodbye to all that At least in the UK version The American version on which Stanley Kubrick’s film adaptation was based ends on a less optimistic note In short it’s a novella of ideas which just happens to contain a fair bit of violenceIt is also uite an artistic and linguistic achievement Those who have seen the film will know that Alex the anti hero and his droogs friends speak a made up language full of Russian loanwords Shakespearean and Biblical influences and Cockney rhyming slang Initially this nadsat language was nearly incomprehensible to me and my first response to it was bad I found myself cursing Burgess telling him that it wasn’t fair to put his readers through something like that If I want to read an incomprehensible book I’ll read Finnegans Wake thank you very much However Burgess takes great care to introduce his new words in an understandable way so after a few pages I got the hang of the nadsat lingo and after a few pages I actually began to enjoy it because I’m enough of a linguist to go in for that sort of thing I found myself loving the Russian loanwords rejoicing when I recognised a German loanword among them and enjoying the Shakespearean uality of Alex’ dialogues I finished the book with an urgent wish to learn Russian and read Shakespeare I doubt many readers will respond to the book in that way not everyone shares my enthusiasm for languages and classical stuff but my point is you’ll get used to the lingo and at some point you’ll begin to admire it because for one thing Burgess is awfully consistent about it and for another it just sounds so damned good I mean if you’re going to come up with a new word for ‘crazy’ you might as well choose bezoomny right? Because it actually sounds mad Doesn’t it?Anyhow there’s to A Clockwork Orange than just philosophical ideas and linguistic pyrotechnics The writing itself is unexpectedly lyrical and not just when it deals with violence Some of the most beautiful passages in the book deal with music More specifically classical music because for all his wicked ways Alex has a passion for classical music He particularly adores Beethoven an adoration I happen to share I came away from the book thinking I might consent to becoming Alex’ devotchka woman wife simply because he is capable of getting carried away by Beethoven’s Ninth and hates having it spoilt for him He’s cultured is Alex and while his culturedness obviously does not eual civilisation and goodness a point he himself is uick to make it does put him a notch above the average hooligan It’s the apparent dichotomy between Alex’ tastes in art and his taste for violence which makes him such an interesting protagonist and which keeps you following his exploits to their not entirely believable but good conclusionIn short then A Clockwork Orange is an excellent book – a bit challenging at first but gripping and interesting and full of style and ideas Not many books can claim as much The Forked Tongue Revisited lengthy descriptions of heinous crimes and they’re vivid descriptions full of excitement Burgess Bad Things in the Night later wrote in his autobiography ‘I was sickened by my own excitement at setting it down’ Yet it does not glorify violence nor is it a book about violence per se Rather it’s an exploration of the morality of free will Of whether it is better to choose to be bad than to be conditioned to be good Of alienation and how to deal with the excesses to which such alienation may Mountain Man (Men of Lake Tahoe Series, lead And ultimately of one man’s decision to say goodbye to all that At Diana (Sunfire, least in the UK version The American version on which Stanley Kubrick’s film adaptation was based ends on a Blue Crush (Blue, less optimistic note In short it’s a novella of ideas which just happens to contain a fair bit of violenceIt is also uite an artistic and At Home in India linguistic achievement Those who have seen the film will know that Alex the anti hero and his droogs friends speak a made up The Woman in the Wall language full of Russian War (The Four Horsemen, loanwords Shakespearean and Biblical influences and Cockney rhyming slang Initially this nadsat Flight of the Piasa language was nearly incomprehensible to me and my first response to it was bad I found myself cursing Burgess telling him that it wasn’t fair to put his readers through something The Golden Vortex like that If I want to read an incomprehensible book I’ll read Finnegans Wake thank you very much However Burgess takes great care to introduce his new words in an understandable way so after a few pages I got the hang of the nadsat El Jarron Azul lingo and after a few pages I actually began to enjoy it because I’m enough of a Sovereign of Stars (The She-King, linguist to go in for that sort of thing I found myself Fall of Paris loving the Russian Mastering Search Analytics loanwords rejoicing when I recognised a German Loaned loanword among them and enjoying the Shakespearean uality of Alex’ dialogues I finished the book with an urgent wish to Gertrude McFuzz and The Big Brag learn Russian and read Shakespeare I doubt many readers will respond to the book in that way not everyone shares my enthusiasm for Heal Your Life Now languages and classical stuff but my point is you’ll get used to the Bondage For Sex lingo and at some point you’ll begin to admire it because for one thing Burgess is awfully consistent about it and for another it just sounds so damned good I mean if you’re going to come up with a new word for ‘crazy’ you might as well choose bezoomny right? Because it actually sounds mad Doesn’t it?Anyhow there’s to A Clockwork Orange than just philosophical ideas and The Monster in the Backpack linguistic pyrotechnics The writing itself is unexpectedly The Cruisers (Book lyrical and not just when it deals with violence Some of the most beautiful passages in the book deal with music More specifically classical music because for all his wicked ways Alex has a passion for classical music He particularly adores Beethoven an adoration I happen to share I came away from the book thinking I might consent to becoming Alex’ devotchka woman wife simply because he is capable of getting carried away by Beethoven’s Ninth and hates having it spoilt for him He’s cultured is Alex and while his culturedness obviously does not eual civilisation and goodness a point he himself is uick to make it does put him a notch above the average hooligan It’s the apparent dichotomy between Alex’ tastes in art and his taste for violence which makes him such an interesting protagonist and which keeps you following his exploits to their not entirely believable but good conclusionIn short then A Clockwork Orange is an excellent book – a bit challenging at first but gripping and interesting and full of style and ideas Not many books can claim as much

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A Clockwork Orange

Ate undertakes to reform Alex to redeem him the novel asks At what cost?This edition includes the controversial last chapter not published in the first edition and Burgess's introduction A Clockwork Orange Resucke Rebellion can take on many forms and in A Clockwork Orange it takes on the form of language the spoken word All societies have their constraints though breaking through them is often difficult What the “poor” disaffected youth do here is create their own system of communication that is so utterly theirs Every word carries history and by destroying such words the youngster are proposing a break from tradition they are proposing something new This idea is captured when they attack the “bourgeoisie” professor in the opening scene; they beat him tear his books apart and strip him naked in the streets It is an act of aggression and power; it is an act that is infused with jealousy and rage The lower classes are sick of the elites and the poor are sick of the rich And they want to stand on their own two feet “Is it better for a man to have chosen evil than to have good imposed upon him?” However despite the symbolic nature of the scene it also demonstrates the rash nature of such youths In their actions they perpetuate such divisions and class divides They never stop to consider that perhaps the professor could be sympathetic to their cause They just don't care; they enjoy violence too much Instead they just see and object of power knowledge and wealth so they attempt to destroy it Having passion and a strong will are vital for social change but using such things sensibly and at the right time is also of eual importance I'm not an advocate of violence but they could have used that better and productively too Society fears them; it fears these boys that represent dissatisfaction and anger How far can they go? How powerful could they become? What will the future hold? Burgress shows us a speculative future a “what if” situation that is not implausible The novel is advisory; it suggests that something needs to be done to society in order to avoid the pitfall the gang fell into here Like all significant literature the work has a universal uality it is as relevant today as it was when it was first published in the 1970s because it shows us what unbridled and misguided temper can achieveAlex the gang leader is thrown into jail after committing a particularly nasty crime The doctors then attempt to rehabilitate him through psychological treatment based on schema theory and the rules of conditioning and association Afterwards the thought of violence sickens him physically and he is thrown out into a world that hates him and one he can no longer survive him He is completely failed by society but it is near impossible to have sympathy with such a reckless anarchist He is violent and spiteful A Clockwork Orange is a postmodern masterpiece because of its experimental style language and allegorical content However it is also an extremely difficult book to read and an even harder one to enjoy The slang frustrated me; it was understandable but very dense at times It’s a clever device but an agenising one I disliked this element for the same reason I will never attempt to read Finnegan’s Wake by James Joyce I liked to get lost I don’t like to have to put effort in when I read; perhaps I’m a lazy reader Regardless though it was a huge relief to actually finish I’m still going to watch the film and I do think I may enjoy it a little than this To Charles Fort, With Love last chapter not published in the first edition and Burgess's introduction A Clockwork Orange Resucke Rebellion can take on many forms and in A Clockwork Orange it takes on the form of Fearful Symmetry language the spoken word All societies have their constraints though breaking through them is often difficult What the “poor” disaffected youth do here is create their own system of communication that is so utterly theirs Every word carries history and by destroying such words the youngster are proposing a break from tradition they are proposing something new This idea is captured when they attack the “bourgeoisie” professor in the opening scene; they beat him tear his books apart and strip him naked in the streets It is an act of aggression and power; it is an act that is infused with jealousy and rage The Bon Appetit, Yall lower classes are sick of the elites and the poor are sick of the rich And they want to stand on their own two feet “Is it better for a man to have chosen evil than to have good imposed upon him?” However despite the symbolic nature of the scene it also demonstrates the rash nature of such youths In their actions they perpetuate such divisions and class divides They never stop to consider that perhaps the professor could be sympathetic to their cause They just don't care; they enjoy violence too much Instead they just see and object of power knowledge and wealth so they attempt to destroy it Having passion and a strong will are vital for social change but using such things sensibly and at the right time is also of eual importance I'm not an advocate of violence but they could have used that better and productively too Society fears them; it fears these boys that represent dissatisfaction and anger How far can they go? How powerful could they become? What will the future hold? Burgress shows us a speculative future a “what if” situation that is not implausible The novel is advisory; it suggests that something needs to be done to society in order to avoid the pitfall the gang fell into here Like all significant The Beast on the Brink literature the work has a universal uality it is as relevant today as it was when it was first published in the 1970s because it shows us what unbridled and misguided temper can achieveAlex the gang The 6 Stages of Sissyhood leader is thrown into jail after committing a particularly nasty crime The doctors then attempt to rehabilitate him through psychological treatment based on schema theory and the rules of conditioning and association Afterwards the thought of violence sickens him physically and he is thrown out into a world that hates him and one he can no Concubine longer survive him He is completely failed by society but it is near impossible to have sympathy with such a reckless anarchist He is violent and spiteful A Clockwork Orange is a postmodern masterpiece because of its experimental style Flower and The Beast 2 language and allegorical content However it is also an extremely difficult book to read and an even harder one to enjoy The slang frustrated me; it was understandable but very dense at times It’s a clever device but an agenising one I disliked this element for the same reason I will never attempt to read Finnegan’s Wake by James Joyce I I Do, Two liked to get Lasers lost I don’t She Weeps Each Time Youre Born like to have to put effort in when I read; perhaps I’m a Tethered to the World (A Phantom Touched lazy reader Regardless though it was a huge relief to actually finish I’m still going to watch the film and I do think I may enjoy it a Warheart (Sword of Truth, little than this

Anthony Burgess ✓ 0 SUMMARY

Ex who talks in a brutal invented slang that brilliantly renders his and his friends' social pathology A Clockwork Orange is a frightening fable about good and evil and the meaning of human freedom And when the st In 1960 Anthony Burgess was 43 and had written 4 novels and had a proper job teaching in the British Colonial Service in Malaya and Brunei Then he had a collapse and the story gets complicated But I like the first cool version AB told which was that he was diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumour and given a year to live Since as you know he lived a further 33 years we may conclude the doctors were not entirely correct However the doctor tells you you have a year to live what do you do? Lapse into a major depression? Get drunk and stay drunk? Buy a Harley davidson? Not if you were Anthony Burgess Uxorious regard for his wife's future security bade him to place his arse on a chair in the unpleasing English seaside town of Hove and type out five and a half novels in the one year left to him which he later pointed out was approximately euivalent to E M Forster's entire lifetime output And the last of these five completed novels was A Clockwork Orange No mean featSo this little novel should be on everyone who hasn't read it's must read list It's a real hoot and it's absolutely eerie in its predictions about youth culture and recreational drug use It's also very famous for its hilarious language all those malenky droogs horrorshow devotchkas and gullivers and lashings of the old in out in out the reader must be warned that it's very catching and you will for sure begin boring all your friends and family about tolchocking the millicents and creeching on your platties and suchlike They'll give you frosty looks and begin avoiding you at the breakfast table but you won't be able to help it In extreme cases they might smeck your grazhny yarbles and that will definately shut you up Reminds me of the old joke where the doctor says to the guy I'm sorry to say you only have three minutes to live Guy says Isn't there anything you can do for me? Doctor says I could boil you an egg Bon Appetit, Yall like the first cool version AB told which was that he was diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumour and given a year to The Beast on the Brink live Since as you know he The 6 Stages of Sissyhood lived a further 33 years we may conclude the doctors were not entirely correct However the doctor tells you you have a year to Concubine live what do you do? Lapse into a major depression? Get drunk and stay drunk? Buy a Harley davidson? Not if you were Anthony Burgess Uxorious regard for his wife's future security bade him to place his arse on a chair in the unpleasing English seaside town of Hove and type out five and a half novels in the one year Flower and The Beast 2 left to him which he I Do, Two later pointed out was approximately euivalent to E M Forster's entire Lasers lifetime output And the She Weeps Each Time Youre Born last of these five completed novels was A Clockwork Orange No mean featSo this Tethered to the World (A Phantom Touched little novel should be on everyone who hasn't read it's must read Warheart (Sword of Truth, list It's a real hoot and it's absolutely eerie in its predictions about youth culture and recreational drug use It's also very famous for its hilarious Bad Luck, Trouble, Death, and Vampire Sex language all those malenky droogs horrorshow devotchkas and gullivers and the gibson lashings of the old in out in out the reader must be warned that it's very catching and you will for sure begin boring all your friends and family about tolchocking the millicents and creeching on your platties and suchlike They'll give you frosty The Forked Tongue Revisited looks and begin avoiding you at the breakfast table but you won't be able to help it In extreme cases they might smeck your grazhny yarbles and that will definately shut you up Reminds me of the old joke where the doctor says to the guy I'm sorry to say you only have three minutes to Bad Things in the Night live Guy says Isn't there anything you can do for me? Doctor says I could boil you an egg