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Jitney AUTHOR August Wilson

Community but as he says about the uniue particulars of black culture I wanted to place this culture onstage in all its richness and fullness and to demonstrate its ability to sustain us through profound moments in our history in which the larger society has thought less of us than we have thought of ourselves This was the first August Wilson play I ever saw in an unforgettable production at the Union Suare Theatre but I'd never read the script itself until now and it's just as wonderful on the page as on the stage Wilson's gorgeous ensemble piece about car service drivers in Pittsburgh gifts each character with an arc and at least one lovely monologue; and the individual speeches can be like arias at times an appropriate term given the operatic scope of Jitney There may be playwrights as good as Wilson but none better

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Set in the 1970s in Pittsburgh's Hill District and depicting gypsy cab drivers who serve black neighborhoods Jitney is the seventh in August Wilson's projected ten play cycle one for each decade on the black experience in twentieth century America A thoroughly revised version of a play Wilson first wrote in 197 August Wilson was a special treasure for the City of Pittsburgh His crowning gem was probable The Pittsburgh Cycle a series of 10 plays each set in a different decade revealing life for African Americans in the City of Pittsburgh Jitney is the story of Pittsburgh in the 1970's Set in Pittsburgh's Hill District during a period of Urban Renewal Jitney service in Pittsburgh was very much a part of everyday life It also provided a microcosm for August Wilson to explore personalities and struggles faced by these drivers Struggles against challenges with government personal relationships and even with themselves are all hereThe characters are real and the frustrations and aspirations are accurately drawn August Wilson always breathes true life into his characters The men drawn here are people we have all met trying to improve themselves trying to help their families and merely trying to surviveYou care about these people and their struggles and ache for their pain in being unable to fight the juggernaut of the government and the oppression of society with its expectations August Wilson is always a good read The Supreme Court and Puerto Rico the 1970s in Pittsburgh's Hill District and depicting gypsy cab drivers who serve black neighborhoods Jitney is Simply Napkins the seventh in August Wilson's projected The Unconscious Civilization ten play cycle one for each decade on The Complete Tightwad Gazette the black experience in The Day Lasts More Than a Hundred Years twentieth century America A الدعوة الإسلامية دعوة عالمية thoroughly revised version of a play Wilson first wrote in 197 August Wilson was a special Writing and Selling Magazine Articles treasure for The Strange Bird the City of Pittsburgh His crowning gem was probable The Pittsburgh Cycle a series of 10 plays each set in a different decade revealing life for African Americans in Collected Stories the City of Pittsburgh Jitney is Collected Stories the story of Pittsburgh in Cleopatras Daughter the 1970's Set in Pittsburgh's Hill District during a period of Urban Renewal Jitney service in Pittsburgh was very much a part of everyday life It also provided a microcosm for August Wilson Funny Feckin' Irish Jokes!: Humorous Jokes about Everything Irish.Sure Tis Great Craic! to explore personalities and struggles faced by Settlers these drivers Struggles against challenges with government personal relationships and even with Never Deny a Duke (Decadent Dukes Society, themselves are all hereThe characters are real and The Sphinx the frustrations and aspirations are accurately drawn August Wilson always breathes Tidelands (Fairmile true life into his characters The men drawn here are people we have all met Pretty Lucy Merwyn trying Strings to improve Carnal Sacrifice (Brides of Caralon, themselves Catch and Release trying Devils Paw (Imp, to help Canyons of Night (Rainshadow, their families and merely All Tied Up trying The Film Snob*s Dictionary to surviveYou care about In the Eyes of Crazy (Kontras Menagerie these people and Tea Environments and Plantation Culture their struggles and ache for 50 Hikes in the Adirondack Mountains their pain in being unable Survive by the Team to fight Angels & Demons (Angels & Demons, the juggernaut of Washington! (Wagons West, the government and Tennessee! (Wagons West, the oppression of society with its expectations August Wilson is always a good read

August Wilson ↠ 4 Free read

9 Jitney was produced in New York for the first time in spring 2000 winning rave reviews and the accolade of the New York Drama Critics Circle as the best play of the yearOne of contemporary theater's most distinguished and elouent voices Wilson writes not about historical events or the pathologies of the black A great play set around taxi drivers and their lives


10 thoughts on “Jitney AUTHOR August Wilson

  1. says:

    Jitney first composed in 1979 was the first of August Wilson’s “Century Cycle” to be written and the last to reach Broadway in 2017 Although extensively revised in 1996 it still seems like an early play sunnier with a “slice of life” realist feel lacking the dark music and expressionistic touches that one comes to expect from August Wilson Still as is always true in a Wilson play the language is vivid and the portrait of the black neighborhoods of Pittsburgh is both palpable and believableThe story—what there is of it—centers around an unofficial cab stand located in Pittsburgh’s inner city where the drivers of “jitneys” unlicensed taxicabs gather to receive their assignments from Becker their respected manager The regular drivers range from steady old Korean war vet Doub to alcoholic former “tailor to the stars” Fielding and the irascible always up in your business Turnbo whom nobody seems to like The main story involves the relationship between Vietnam vet Darnell and Rena the mother of his little son Jesse who love each other but have not yet learned to trust And there other unsettling matters at the jitney station too Becker’s son has just been released from prison and there are rumors that the Pittsburgh Housing Authority is planning to tear the old jitney stand downFor a taste of Wilson’s wonderful language I give you the voice of Rena who has just learned Darnell has been planning to “surprise” her with a house and who is not nearly as happy with the idea as Darnell expects her to be I love this passage because I’m convinced most women—including my wife—would feel much the same way You gonna surprise me with a house? Don’t do that A new TV maybe A stereo a couch a refrigerator okay But don’t surprise me with a house that I didn’t even have the chance to pick out You can’t surprise me with a house and I’m supposed to say “Oh Darnell that’s nice” at one time I would have But I’m not seventeen no I have responsibilities I want to kow if it has a hookup for a washer and dryer ‘cause I got to wash Jesse’s clothes I want to know if it has a yard and do it have a fence and how far Jesse has to go to school I ain’t thinking about where to put the TV That’s not what's important to me And you supposed to know Darnell You supposed to know what’s important to me like I’m supposed to know what’s important to you I’m not asking you to do it by yourself I’m here with you We in this together


  2. says:

    Jitney is play #8 in August Wilson's Century Cycle Jitney tells the story of a group of men who run a cab service Wilson focuses on their livelihood their dreams and their imperfections I enjoyed the cast of characters as well as the monologues from a few of them Although very minor I did like reading the references to characters in earlier plays However I felt the ending was a little lacking Fences is still the best of the plays so far Two to go


  3. says:

    August Wilson was a special treasure for the City of Pittsburgh His crowning gem was probable The Pittsburgh Cycle a series of 10 plays each set in a different decade revealing life for African Americans in the City of Pittsburgh Jitney is the story of Pittsburgh in the 1970's Set in Pittsburgh's Hill District during a period of Urban Renewal Jitney service in Pittsburgh was very much a part of everyday life It also provided a microcosm for August Wilson to explore personalities and struggles faced by these drivers Struggles against challenges with government personal relationships and even with themselves are all hereThe characters are real and the frustrations and aspirations are accurately drawn August Wilson always breathes true life into his characters The men drawn here are people we have all met trying to improve themselves trying to help their families and merely trying to surviveYou care about these people and their struggles and ache for their pain in being unable to fight the juggernaut of the government and the oppression of society with its expectations August Wilson is always a good read


  4. says:

    A great play set around taxi drivers and their lives


  5. says:

    Penumbra Theater in St Paul Minnesota is celebrating its 40th Anniversary The theater's founders imagined a theater for by and about the black community It is only fitting that as part of its anniversary celebration that they have chosen to produce August Wilson's Jitney as Penumbra has a storied history with playwright August Wilson For instance Jitney was first produced as a one act at Penumbra in 1984 and has been produced twice since at Penumbra Penumbra's Bookends program offers theatre patrons a pre and post discussion of each of its productions I was fortunate to get tickets for these discussions but was not able to see the production itself so I decided to read it As a theatre major and teacher I understand that reading a play is an entirely different experience than attending a performance of said play Sans spectacle and melody one has the opportunity to look entirely at plot character and theme I'm not a fan of drama strictly as literature A Pioneer Press reviewer referred to the cacophony of voices in Penumbra's current production That wasn't my experience in reading the scriptJitney refers to the nickel it cost in the early 20th century to take an unlicensed cab generally centered in communities taxis didn't serve Eventually jitney referred to the cab itself As Marion Isaac McClinton says in the introduction to the play When he was driving jitneys he wasn't just making money to take care of himself he was also doing something to help take care of his community He was'providing a service' Set in 1977 Pittsburg Jitney takes place in a jitney storefront where a group of jitney drivers and the people in their lives congregate We learn that developers are going to level the block from which the jitney dispatches cabs threatening the livelihoods and dreams of the drivers and those in their livesAs a reader what was compelling to me were the themes implicit in the story uestions I would like to ask at the final Bookend gathering will center around these themes With the goal of a theatre that is for by and about the black community which themes are particular to that community and which are universal in nature? In terms of windows and mirrors then what does the black community see reflected about itself? What do those from other communities learn both about the black community and about themselves by looking through this window? Which ideas are a function of race and which are functions of class? Given that the play is set in 1977 are the thematic ideas still relevant today? What has changed and what has not?Some thematic ideas that I found interesting include I am curious about the use of the word slave and nigger by the characters towards one another p 29 'What sense does it make for that McNeil boy to steal his grandmama's television? What sense it make for Shealy's nephew to break in Taylor's bar? What sense it make for that boy to run with his girlfriend's sister? Half these niggers around here running on empty and that boy at the top of the list' p 30 'It ain't easy these days to raise a child I don't know what's in these young boys' heads Seem like they don't respect nobody They don't even respect themselves When I was coming along that was the first thing you learned If you don't respect yourselfuite naturally you couldn't respect nobody else When I was coming along the respect you had for other peoplethe people respected you Seem like it come back to you double' p31 'I just try to live and let live' p 32 'Man these white folks is slick They think of all kind of ways to get your money' p 36 'I'm just tiredCan't hardly explain it none You look up one day and all you got left is what you ain't spent Everyday cost you something and you don't all the time realize it' p 38 'They won't be satisfied until they tear the whole goddam neighborhood down' p 52 'You got to have somebody you can count on you know p 55 'You ain't got nothing now You got less than the day you was born Then you had some dignity Some innocenceYou ain't got nothing now You took and threw it all away' p 55 'What I ain't got is a son that did me honorThe Bible say Honor thy father and thy mother I ain't got that I ain't got a son I can be proud of That's what I ain't got A son to come up behind meliving a good honest decent life I got a son people point to and say That's Becker's boy That's the one that killed that gal That's Becker's boy The one they gave the electric chair That's Becker's boy' p 56 'I taught you two wrongs don't make a right' p 56 'I don't know if you knew it Pop but you were a big man Everywhere you went people treated you like a big manI would just look at you and wonder how you could be that big I wanted to be like that I would go to school and try to make myself feel big But I never could I told myself that's okaywhen I got grown I'm gonna be big like thatI told myself if I ever got big I wouldn't let nothing make me small' p 62 'It's them pretty womenget a man killed' p 63 'The first thing a man do when he get a woman he don't want nobody else to have her He say this is mine i'm gonna hold on to this I'm gonna go over and see Betty Jean but I'm gonna hold on to this If I catch anybody sneaking around her sniffingI'm gonna bust his nose and break both of his legsHe say that then he go on over to Betty Jean He don't know some fellow done said the same thing about catching somebody around Betty Jean' p 64 'The white man ain't paying you no mind You ought to stop thinking like that They been planning to tear these shacks down before you was born You keep thinking everybody's against you and you ain't never gonna get nothing I seen a hundred niggers too lazy to get up out the bed in the morning talking about the white an is against them That's just an excuse You want to make something of your life then the opportunity is there You just have to shake off that White folks is against me attitude Hell they don't even know you alive' p 65 'They knew I was alive when they drafted me and sent me over to Vietnam' p 67 'It ain't all the time what you want Sometimes it's about what you need Black folks always get the two confused' p 74 'I want somebody who's gonna share with menot hide things from me' p 75 'And you supposed to knowYou supposed to know what's important to me like I'm supposed to know what's important to you I'm not asking you to do it by yourself I'm here with you We in this together' p 78 'Ain't nothing like owning some property They might even call you for jury duty' p 80 'If you trying to figure out what to doyou got to first figure out how you got in the situation you in That's something simple But you be surprised how many people can't figure that out'tIsaac McClinton says in his introduction The story of Becker and Booster a story of father and son becomes the legend of every parent and child The story of Youngblood and Rena two young adults attempting with determination to do the heavy lifting that true love calls for while trying to make a decent and better life for their son Turnbo Doub Fielding Shealy ad Phil the drivers and customers of the jitney station men who meet each day straight up and head on and who only want to reach the end of the day with the same amount of dignity and integrity that they began with These are the stories that must be told and passed on because they reveal to us our humanity giving us the hope that we might walk our day with a similar grace and nobilityThese are things August Wilson wants you to know Highly recommended reading but seeing an actual performance would trump reading the script I hear Jitney is coming to Broadway in 2017


  6. says:

    Wellthis is not the first time I have read this play but I re read it for the project I'm working on with my US History class I was an intern at Seattle Repertory Theater in 2001 2002 when I first read this play and encountered the man who wrote it I got to spend some time with August Wilson during that time and I had nothing but admiration for this particular play I loved the choral nature of the dialogue and the complicated relationship between the father and son Becker and Booster I also think that this is one of the best ends to an Act 1 that I've ever read and seen August paid me a compliment during the time I spent with himhe told the other intern that was attached to him and I was only tagging along that she could bring me often because I had a good sense of humor I laughed a lot during the rehearsals for JITNEY when the rest of the theater was uiet and anyone who knows my laugh knows that it's infectiousAnyway it's still a good play and I really enjoyed re reading it62919Re reading for scene study class in a prison class I'm teachingTwo students in one of the prison classes I'm teaching are doing one of the BeckerBooster scenes and I re read the play because it looks like I might have to step in and play Becker because that student has ceased to come to class and the student playing Booster has worked very hard on his scene alreadyIt's interesting how life experience can make the perceptions one has for a play change I have been teaching at a predominantly African American Community College for the past five years and the vernacular has become second nature to me I guess I have gotten old too because the line Turnbo says about people not respecting themselves and thus not respecting others really resonated with me as someone who has transformed into someone who says things like These young people don't understand My father died since the first time I encountered this play and Becker's line that references how things don't matter after a monumental death and how you can't wait for 'God to decide to hold your hand' if you want to change your situation you have to change it That took several years of being stuck in mourning to learn And just like Becker I realized that the things I thought used to matter just don't any I am also married now and have been in a relationship with the same person for over 11 years and the line Becker has about his second marriage about pulling and pushing really struck me This idea that sometimes one person pulls and the other pushes or the other way around but it's a good marriage as long as those movements are in the same direction It isn't easy butit's part of the work Anyway I'm nervous to step into a role that a I should never do based on gender race age etc b is very fraught emotionally which is hard to do with the armor needed to teach behind bars butI have no choiceBack cover Set in 1970 in the Hill District of Pittsburgh that is served by a makeshift taxi company JITNEY is a beautiful addition to the author's decade by decade cycle of plays about the black American experience in the twentieth centuryuote I like Becker Ain't nothing left to do now but get married Come November it'll be seventeen years that me and Lucille been together Seventeen years I told her say work with me She say okay I wasn't sure what it meant myself I thought it meant pull or push together But she showed me one can push and the other can pullas long as it's in the same direction You know what I mean? It ain't all gonna flow together all the time That's life As long as it don't break apart When you look around you'll see that all you got is each other There ain't much Even when it look like there isyou come one day to find out there ain't much worth having


  7. says:

    This is not my first foray into Wilson but it is the start of a concerted effort to finish the Century Cycle I'm tackling them in the order they were written I wondered if this was the best way to go but now I can't imagine starting anywhere but with Jitney Like many plays the physical universe of Jitney is tiny It is confined to a single gypsy cab office connected to the outside world through the characters' histories calls from customers and the appearance of Becker's son Booster home from 20 years in prison The limitation of place heightens the crisis at hand the city's plans to raze the building in their neighborhood Their lives as well as their jobs are rooted in that office Wilson thereby raises the stakes on what his characters will lose than their jobs and it drives home the importance of their decision not to leaveIt is a tense play almost throughout uieting in tone for the conclusion an interesting and uniue choice for a play the action usually goes the other way From the beginning Wilson sets his conflicts to a broiling point rooted in character development that seems improbable in the slim volume but which Wilson manages adroitly The main conflicts are between older meddling Turnbo and Youngblood a dreamer on the cusp of anchoring himself in adulthood both veterans Korea and Vietnam respectively; Fielding an aged alcoholic and Becker; and between Becker and his son Booster in whom he had placed all his dreams of a better life Wilson excels at anchoring his play with intense personal relationships while exploring race and racism overt and institutional class identity while creating a rich tapestry of Pittsburgh in the 1970s all without leaving the room It is not a perfect play Sometimes the characters particularly Becker and Booster have to come too uickly to the climax of their argument or have to bring home overarching concerns that don't yet feel uite natural But it still is brilliant and honest And the ending is without a doubt perfect I am referring specifically to the last line in particular The line reminds me of William Carlos Williams so much depends It is uiet and simple and powerful It speaks volumes It makes whole the play; it develops Booster; it shows us a future It is a subtle reclamation of power It is the taking of a stand and in a single sentence we know what that stand will be and why and why it is important Lacking Wilson's ability I can't sum up why it works so perfectly but it does It demonstrates Wilson's mastery of his craft and it gives us a glimpse of where he and his Century Cycle are headed


  8. says:

    This book gets 355 stars too bad goodreads doesn't give 12 stars But anyway as I continue to read the August Wilson Century Cycle books during this fake spring break I realize that this man does not fail to keep his characters grounded and true to the African American societies of each decade Jitney is a play focusing on gypsy cab drivers post Vietnam War in Pittsburgh 1977 There are men of all ages ranging from the Elder Turnbo whose memories of the military and war do not fail to falter Then we have Fielding Becker and Youngblood whose high hopes and dreams do not seem to come true because of the poor situations that he is living in At only 24 he was already in the military as well as raising a son and trying to maintain a marriage that his wife believes is all lies Not to give anything away but Wilson does keep me engaged in his plays at all times His accomplishments range from Pulitzer Prizes to Broadway theatres named in his honor I do plan to read all 9 or 10 books of this cycle And I know that I will be opened to ideas and struggles that african americans bravely came out of


  9. says:

    This was the first August Wilson play I ever saw in an unforgettable production at the Union Suare Theatre but I'd never read the script itself until now and it's just as wonderful on the page as on the stage Wilson's gorgeous ensemble piece about car service drivers in Pittsburgh gifts each character with an arc and at least one lovely monologue; and the individual speeches can be like arias at times an appropriate term given the operatic scope of Jitney There may be playwrights as good as Wilson but none better


  10. says:

    OMG the last scene I don't normally read drama but I am starting to think I should read And of course this being a local play made it that much interesting for me Highly recommended


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