Algorithms to Live By The Computer Science of Human Decisions Download í 108



10 thoughts on “Algorithms to Live By The Computer Science of Human Decisions

  1. says:

    This is one of those books that you pick up in the hope that it lives up to its title but is likely not to because it was written by someone from marketing Every now and then it pays off and this is one of those timesThis book spoke volumes to me I have studied math and I love math especially applying it to scientific problems But I have never looked into algorithms nor have I been taught algorithms What a shame I took to the ideas instantly and it all made complete sense not only the algorithms but the living by them I guess it all ties into how our brains work and how Turing likened computers to our brains It all makes sense because our brains are computers that work by algorithms Messy algorithms that clash and battle against each other but predictable in some waysSo embracing how algorithms work and some of the solutions they suggest and applying them to your everyday life may seem like a stretch but you're already doing it you just don't realise it And you may not be solving your problems in the most effective manner but the authors explore the reasons for that tooSo if you view reality like I do pick this book up It has revelations in it than any holy text It gives me frameworks to work on problems that I already think about It helped me make even sense of this crazy placeAs soon as I finished the audiobook I started right back at the beginning again The narrator is one of the authors and he does a brilliant job I'm going to get a physical copy of this too when it is out in paperback It's a keeper It's a treasure So much bliss


  2. says:

    I was captivated by much of this book It's the perfect antidote to the argument you often hear from young maths students 'What's the point? I'll never use this in real life' This often comes up with algebra which often is useful but reflects the way that we rarely cover the most applicable bits of maths to everyday life at high school Although this book is subtitled 'the computer science of human decisions' it's really about the maths of human decision making which is often supported by computers I suspect the 'computer science' label is to make it sexy than boring old mathematicsIf there is any danger that the 'M' word would turn you off the book tends to skip over the mathematical workings concentrating on the outcomes and how they're relevant to the kind of decisions we make in everyday life and it's that application side that makes it particularly interesting helped by a good readable style from the co authors So for instance one of the earliest areas covered is the kind of decision where you are selecting between a number of options that arrive seuentially and where you have to make a decision on which is best for you part way through the seuence even though there may be better options in the future The classic examples for this are some kinds of job interviews house buying and finding a partner for lifeIt might seem there can be no sensible advice but mathematically it's very clear You wait until you've got through 37% of the choices then pick the next one that's better than any you've seen before It's not that this will necessarily deliver your best of all possible worlds More often than not it won't But it will give you a better result than any other mechanism for deciding when to go for a particular option Of course it's not always easy to apply For example unless it's something like an interview with closed applications how do you know when you are 37% of the way through the available options? Luckily the authors point out that there are approximations to get around this which include that the approach can also apply to the amount of time available for the processAnd that's just the start Along the way you will discover the best way to sort the books on your shelves into alphabetic order something I confess I did last year using a sub optimal mechanism how to balance exploration for example trying out new restaurants with exploitation for example returning to tried and tested restaurants how the concept of caching can revolutionise your filing system and make that pile of papers on your desk that everyone mocks the sensible approach why Bayes theorem is so important and much I absolutely revelled in this bookThe content only fades a bit when the applications aren't about real world decisions So for instance there's some material about how the internet works that is very interesting if you like that kind of thing I do but hasn't got the same feeling of personal utility to it so lacks some of the bite of the other chapters This is even obvious in the section on randomness I would also have liked to see acknowledgement that most of the content was really from the area of study called operational operations in the US research a discipline that happens to make use of computers rather than true computer science but that's a specialist moanRealistically speaking I don't think much of the content of this book will truly change how any of us do things Interestingly the authors reveal than an expert in the field pretty much consciously ignored the mathematical approach in a particular case opting for of a 'feels right' choice But that doesn't stop the whole business whether it's the relative simplicity of the 37% rule or the mind twisting possibilities of game theory from being both potentially practical and highly enjoyable as presented here Recommended


  3. says:

    I enjoy thinking about algorithms as they are applied to technical problems So when I saw this book I thought This is a book written just for me And that assessment was absolutely correct It is a fascinating book all about how sophisticated algorithms are applicable to everyday problemsThe book starts out describing the optimal stopping problem It is also sometimes called the secretary hiring problem and I have seen it applied to dating to find a romantic partner and this book points out that it can also be applied to looking for an apartment in a seller's market or searching for a parking space It can be summed up by the phrase uit while you're ahead Basically you have a finite amount of time to complete a search for the best item or person What do you do? It can be shown mathematically that you should conduct a search for 37% of your total available time without making any decisions Then at the very next time you find an item or person that is better than all of the previous ones you should jump on it I read about this beforehand but I didn't realize that 37% comes from 1e where e is the natural exponent The next topic in the book is the dichotomy between explore and exploit That is to say when you are looking for something to do will you try something new explore or repeat something that has pleased you in the past exploit The answer has to do with how much time you have in this situation Movie seuels are all about exploiting because movie revenues are decreasing If you are new to an area you will explore restaurants but if you are moving away soon you will return to restaurants you have previously visited I enjoyed how this issue is related to the multi armed bandit problem This is a mathematical problem that has lots of applications; choosing the best slot machine in a casino for example or designing a web site that will maximize profits for a companySorting is a big topic in the book It turns out that top poker players sort themselves out and don't want to play with players they think are better Libraries use an inefficient caching system putting recent acuisitions in front Instead they should put the most popular books in front The Naguchi filing system involves returning all files to the extreme left This goes against the recommendations of efficiency experts who recommend sorting by topic Leaving a pile of papers on top of a desk is an example of the MOST efficient filing system I enjoyed reading an anecdote about Barack Obama visiting Google before he became president At Google he was treated to a pretend job interview He was asked if you had to design an algorithm to sort a million 32 bit integers what would you do? He replied that he would not use a bubble sort algorithm and all the people in the audience applauded his correct answerI enjoyed reading about human memory from an algorithmic point of view Memory recall is a problem of organization It was fascinating to read that a graph of the probability of remembering something as a function of elapsed time exactly mimics the probability that a word appears in a newspaper headline twice in a rowKnowing makes it harder to remember things; what we call memory decline is actually just learning A brain fart is actually just a cache missRelated to sorting are various problems of scheduling Examples from the book include multiple laundry loads to minimize total washing plus drying time and minimizing the rotting of food from a CSA Community Supported AgricultureNo book on everyday applications of algorithms should bypass Bayesian reasoning and this is an important subject in this book Our memories of images of plane crashes and car crashes are roughly the same; as a result we are surprised that there are orders of magnitude deaths in car crashes than in plane crashesThe dangers of over fitting are discussed at length As an example police and FBI agents sometimes over train; they sometimes use good gun training etiuette during a shoot out with fatal conseuences I really appreciated the discussion of how over fitting is avoided in biological evolution It is dangerous for organisms to evolve to over fit an ecological niche because the species might not be able to rapidly adapt to an uncertain future environmentI also thought that the description of exponential backoff was very well treated in the book This esoteric sounding algorithm is used in all computer networks but is also used by many of us in treating flaky friends and in punishment for probation violationsThe last chapter in the book was about game theory It is helpful in reading this book to have some previous background an understanding of a Nash euilibrium The following uote sums it up nicely Love is like organized crime It changes the structure of the marriage game so that the euilibrium becomes the outcome that works best for everybody I highly recommend this book Regardless of your mathematics background it will intrigue you and amaze you to see how math permeates our everyday lives


  4. says:

    Okay I loved this book So what is it about?The big pictureWe encounter many problems in our daily life for instance should I park my car here or proceed with the hope of finding a free spot a bit further? Should I try new restaurants or just stick to good old ones I know? How can I find my life's purpose? What is the fastest way I can sort out my books hmmm should I even try sorting out my shelves? How can I best schedule my tasks for maximum productivity and many routine problems like these These problems have a mathematical and computer science basis to which the scientific community has found optimum or near to optimum answers and this book teaches us how we can apply these solutions to our daily life problems Amazing isn't it? DThe book itself Well the idea of the book is just marvelous In addition the writers are profoundly knowledgeable and educated both from academic and non academic perspectives; hence they've woven perfectly selected anecdotes philosophical economical or psychological facts literary phrases into the fabric of their stories which makes the book superb This book is not an easy read at all and it's a good thing in contrast with common belief since it challenges and stretches your mind and expands your thoughts horizons Part of this difficulty stems from the fact that authors are having a hard time simplifying mathematical and computer science facts The material sometimes gets a bit tough to comprehend On the other hand It seems to me that authors are trying hard to make the text complex | Final wordThis book definitely is amongst the richest books I've ever consumed lots of knowledge and insights are compiled in an applicable manner I would whole hardheartedly recommend this books to all the nerds and geeks out there and everyone who enjoys improving efficiency and productivity of hisher day to day life


  5. says:

    Even though I'm a computer programmer I have to say when I saw the title I was a bit put off Algorithms are what I use for telling a computer what to do but I'm not sure I feel comfortable with using them to tell myself what to do Real life is less tidy and binary than the data in a computerBut perhaps out of train wreck curiousity I picked it up and took a look The first thing I noticed is that Alison Gopnik gave it a dust jacket endorsement Ok you have my full attention nowOnce I started reading I understood a bit better what the authors were getting at A lot of what ought to be called philosophy is nowadays most often carefully looked at by computer scientists uestions like1 how do you balance finding new vs getting satisfaction from what you already know is good enough? Should I eat at my favourite restaurant or give a new one a try? Should I move to a new city or stay where I know where the best bookstorecoffeeshopbarrestaurants are? Should I try out a new career or employer or stay with the job I've got?2 how do you balance keeping things orderly and keeping them handy?3 how do I balance the risk of missing out on some important news vs the problem of spending my life endlessly checking email and texts?4 how do I balance the risk of not thinking deeply enough about something vs the risk of overthinking something that is actually simple?We have spent over half a century looking at these uestions in detail in order to make computer programs work efficiently when they sort analyse or store and retrieve data Our lives are rarely so tidy and binary as a computer's data but all of these uestions are highly relevant to uestions we face in our own messy analogue livesThis isn't I think a reason to decide that you should spend 37% of your expected adult lives dating and then propose to the next person you date who is better than anyone you've dated so far as one information theory algorithm might suggest But there are a lot of situations in life where we have to choose between deciding how picky to be vs it's time to make our pick For example the amount of time to look for a house or a parking spot or a new job are places where I think it's ok to use a bit of algorithmic logic instead of just going with your gut impulse which is a lot easier for people to sway with savvy salesmanshipFor me though likely than that I will actually use the uicksort algorithm for my socks see chapter 3 is that I will think clearly about the issues involved when I do have a large sorting project to do Just reading about the tradeoffs involved helps to think clearly about them In sorting what are the chances you are ever going to need to search through the stuff you're sorting anyway? If there's a good chance you won't just do a rough bucket sort and call it done In searching are you needing the best chance of getting the absolute best or the best chance of getting something above average? If you pass on an opportunity and then go back what is the chance that opportunity will still be there in the crowded parking lot not much; in job search depends on the labour marketThe fun thing about this kind of book is that it is not about any particular topic per se it is about all topics and none It is a book for thinking about thinking and thinking about better ways to think It is fun in the same way that solving puzzles or playing games is fun; it's not that the puzzle or game is important in itself it's that it's fun to feel your brain working effectively on a hard task which is why the puzzle or game can't be too easy or it won't be fun Reading this book is an opportunity to think well about a lot of topics from your everyday life and who knows it may make you think slightly better about them after you're done I probably won't really live by these algorithms but it is fun to live with them ie having them available when I feel like it and this book is a pain free and enjoyable way to get introduced


  6. says:

    A simple algorithm to conceive of literary plots could be to slot them as belonging to one of these categories Man vs Nature Man vs Self Man vs Man Man vs Society Brian Tom enlists findings from computer science to guide us through these Algorithms here are the shortcuts or even the intuitions that guide us through problems that are intractable at first glance We apparently use them everyday Brian Tom are here to document this and to show how exactly we can make them efficient by exploring the idea of human algorithm design—searching for better solutions to the challenges people encounter every day The central thesis is that it’s best to use shortcuts to improve your probability of success and remember that “perfection is the enemy of the good” The book’s algorithms are intended to reduce time spent puzzling conserve energy for the things that matterWhen it comes to the first two categories computer science is shown to be a good guide to problems created by the fundamental structure of the world and by our limited capacities for processing information As with all the sciences before it computer science and data science are pretty effective in dealing with these issues And the computational approach seems to be a remarkably useful improvement in dealing with areas like self control or complex everyday decisionsIn this part of the book when we deal with Man vs Nature Man vs Self we mostly encounter well defined problems and potential algorithms to deal with them We have a nice variety of approaches hereFirst we are given a taste of the “Optimal stopping problems” which spring from the irreversibility and irrevocability of time How do you decide when to stop searching be it for a the perfect mate the perfect employee the perfect job or the perfect weekend movie? The answer seems to be simple 37% you stop once 37% of your options have been checked out Much useful than it sounds this number is the output of an algorithm Whether it’s an apartment a parking space or a spouse the right moment to stop searching and start choosing falls under the umbrella of problems called “optimal stopping” The general solution to optimal stopping problems reveals that you should spend 37 percent of your time gaining an impression of what’s out there and the rest of the time selecting anything better than the average of what you observed thus far Need to rent an apartment in three weeks? Simply take one week to observe and two weeks to pounce on the next best thing This means that you have a good sample of the options you have so you don’t jump to early decision and miss out on the good choices that were just around the corner and at the same time you don’t waste all your time only searching Then we are introduced to “the exploreexploit dilemma” springing from time’s limited supply should we revisit favourite restaurants and places and ensure a good time exploit or should we explore bravely out to new experiences and places explore in the hope that we might stumble on something incredible? If we don’t explore we might miss out on a lot of YOLO stuff but if we only explore and do not exploit the good stuff we have already discovered a favourite dish a cared for home spouse close friends etc then we might me missing out on even SO how do we figure out an optimal ration between ExploreExploit? Turns out computer scientists have been working on finding this balance for than fifty years They even have a name for it the exploreexploit tradeoff The exploreexploit tradeoff tells us how to find the balance between trying new things and enjoying our favourites The answer is to think about the time you have left the time you have the your strategy should shift So the young should explore and the elderly should exploit and wherever you are in that continuum you should ration the Es accordingly YOLO after allThere are Relaxation and randomization emerge as vital and necessary strategies for dealing with the ineluctable complexity of challenges like trip planning and vaccinations Sorting theory tells us how and whether to arrange our offices Caching theory tells us how to fill our closets Scheduling theory tells us how to fill the unforgiving minute well etcThen comes the next two categories Man vs Man and Man vs Society problems these are in effect the problems that we pose and cause each other Here the authors move away from computer science and enlists mathematics as well specifically and predictably game theory to help us out And the cross pollination between game theory and computer science gives us algorithmic game theory for tackling issues like investing bubble and even plain arguments The solutions are much less rigorous here with 1 the advice to “change the game” if the game threatens to go into less than optimal euilibriums and 2 an exhortation to be “computationally kind” to reduce the cognitive load of the participants emerging as the main “algorithms to live by” when it comes to living in society So as always the book would seem to be teaching us again that no matter how computationally adept we are dealing with each other is something that just can’t be fitted into any algorithm formula or thumb rule We gotta wing it


  7. says:

    I really enjoyed this book It's a nice popular review of research in a style similar to Malcolm Gladwell It was fascinating to see the wide reaching applications of classic algorithms from computer science and also humbling to see how many problems are essentially impossible to truly optimize However as luck would have it there are often simple approximations that give a pretty good solution with very little effort The authors do a good job giving interesting backstory on the algorithms and relating them in ways that are hopefully accessible to readers who aren't familiar with computer scienceMy favorite chapters were the ones that were the most strongly anchored in the mundane especially Optimal Stopping parking spacehousehunting ExploreExploit should I try a new restaurant or go to my old favorite? and Scheduling what to do with your to do list Some of the others such as Networking and Overfitting were theoretical and less memorable but still had nice historical vignettes of the people behind famous names like BayesIf you have a technicalanalytical inclination and have ever wondered what the ideal way to solve an everyday problem I think you'll find a lot to like in this book


  8. says:

    An engaging conceptual tour of computationalnetworking concepts how they apply in the computer world and how we can use them to reframe streamline and manage a diverse array of real life problems both silly and serious As a reader who knows little about computer science but loves learning new frameworks drawing analogies between disparate fields and finding metaphors for life everywhere I thoroughly enjoyed this Some of my favorite principlesconcepts 37% rule of optimal stopping when to stop scouting prospects and just commit; exploreexploit tradeoff chance of finding a new gem vs certainty of enjoying a known fave; LRU last recently used sorting as an efficient prophylactic for searching; layered caches as metaphor for human memory brain fart as cache miss; overfitting when interpreting data prefer simple accuracy to complex precision; constraint relaxation as a techniue to address knotty problems; buffer bloat when backlog is bad best to reject all incoming reuests until it clears; exponential back off when head butts recur double your wait time before trying again; computational kindness by reducing the options on the table we do people's brains a favor


  9. says:

    In this book the authors explain famous algorithms in real world context My notes from this book 1 Optimal Stopping2 Old people don't lose memory they have so much of it that it slows their system3 Procrastination can be seen as an efficient scheduling problem with wrong priority4 Predictive Models Gaussian Power Law Erlang5 Over fitting It really is true that a company will build whatever the CEO decides to measure6 Penalize complexity Occam's Razor Principle7 A bit of conservative a certain bias in favor of history can buffer us against the boom and bust cycle of fads8Over fitting Examples Military Training taste buds9 Early Stopping Appropriate for Uncertainty10 The prefect is the enemy of the good11 Continuous Relaxation for discrete optimization12 Lagrangian Relaxation You don't HAVE to obey the law There are conseuences to everything and you get to decide whether you want to face those13 Random Sampling Miller Rabin Primality Test14 Charity GiveDirectly uses random samples of review15 Bloom filters for search engine crawls16 Simulated Annealing Random restart hill climbing17 Randomness heart of creativity?18 Networking Circuit Switching Packet Switching19 Exponential backoff20 AIMD Additive Increase Multiplicative Decrease TCP's Sawtooth21 Game Theory Price of Anarchy Selfish routing only has 43 as it's price of Anarchy that's how internet is working fine infact 33% close to optimal22 Price of Anarchy is very high in case of Prisoner's Dilemma23 Tragedy of Commons Pollution Climate Change Number of Vacations employees use etc24 Game Theory Information Cascade25 Vickrey Auction I recommend this book to all


  10. says:

    So many great one liners in this bookStop on Tinder at 37%Use thick markers in brainstormingAll things being eual it'll last as long as it's lastedBut lest you think this is another fluffy brain book it's actually hard computer programming with the occasional laugh out loud line The team behind it are serious academics who have thought deeply about how computers think and how we can use those algorithms to make our lives easier Which when you think about it isn't so crazy because who taught the computers to think in the first place? We're just reclaiming tactics that are ours to begin with


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Download ↠ eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ✓ Brian Christian

A fascinating exploration of how insights from computer algorithms can be applied to our everyday lives helping to solve common decision making problems and illuminate the workings of the human mindAll our lives are constrained by limited space and time limits that give rise to a particular set of problems What should we do or leave undone in a day or a lifetime? How much messiness should we accept? What balance of new ac This is one of those books that you pick up in the hope that it lives up to its title but is likely not to because it was written by someone from marketing Every now and then it pays off and this is one of those timesThis book spoke volumes to me I have studied math and I love math especially applying it to scientific problems But I have never looked into algorithms nor have I been taught algorithms What a shame I took to the ideas instantly and it all made complete sense not only the algorithms but the living by them I guess it all ties into how our brains work and how Turing likened computers to our brains It all makes sense because our brains are computers that work by algorithms Messy algorithms that clash and battle against each other but predictable in some waysSo embracing how algorithms work and some of the solutions they suggest and applying them to your everyday life may seem like a stretch but you're already doing it you just don't realise it And you may not be solving your problems in the most effective manner but the authors explore the reasons for that tooSo if you view reality like I do pick this book up It has revelations in it than any holy text It gives me frameworks to work on problems that I already think about It helped me make even sense of this crazy placeAs soon as I finished the audiobook I started right back at the beginning again The narrator is one of the authors and he does a brilliant job I'm going to get a physical copy of this too when it is out in paperback It's a keeper It's a treasure So much bliss TRILOGÍA COMPLETA UN GIN TONIC, POR FAVOR of how insights from computer algorithms can be applied to Fil. Filosofía. Aula 3D - 9788468229485 our everyday lives helping to solve common decision making problems and illuminate the workings Topofilia (General) of the human mindAll Lingua galega e literatura 2º ESO. LOMCE (Libro de texto) our lives are constrained by limited space and time limits that give rise to a particular set Manual de albañilería of problems What should we do Gramatika Dbh 1, ikaslearen liburua (i.bai.berri proiektua) - 9788483946220 or leave undone in a day Thomas Dekker. Mi lucha. or a lifetime? How much messiness should we accept? What balance Sintoísmo. La Vía De Los Kami (Filosofía y Religión) of new ac This is Durar más en el sexo: Controla cuerpo y mente. Olvídate de la crema y spray retardante one Shipwrecks around Lands End of those books that you pick up in the hope that it lives up to its title but is likely not to because it was written by someone from marketing Every now and then it pays Modern Spain off and this is Journey into Madness one Sgàile (Espectro) (Espectro) (Taibhse, of those timesThis book spoke volumes to me I have studied math and I love math especially applying it to scientific problems But I have never looked into algorithms nor have I been taught algorithms What a shame I took to the ideas instantly and it all made complete sense not Essential Classic X-Men, Vol. 3 only the algorithms but the living by them I guess it all ties into how Body Types our brains work and how Turing likened computers to Ändere nicht deinen Partner, ändere dich selbst: Negative Beziehungsmuster erkennen und auflösen: So machen Sie nie wieder dieselben Fehler our brains It all makes sense because Le Thésaurus - Dictionnaire des Analogies our brains are computers that work by algorithms Messy algorithms that clash and battle against each Enslaved in Unknown World other but predictable in some waysSo embracing how algorithms work and some The Mountain and the Fathers of the solutions they suggest and applying them to your everyday life may seem like a stretch but you're already doing it you just don't realise it And you may not be solving your problems in the most effective manner but the authors explore the reasons for that tooSo if you view reality like I do pick this book up It has revelations in it than any holy text It gives me frameworks to work News from a New Republic on problems that I already think about It helped me make even sense Beginner's Guide to ZBrush of this crazy placeAs soon as I finished the audiobook I started right back at the beginning again The narrator is diseno de moda conceptos basicos y aplicaciones practicas de ilustracion de moda one Los asquerosos of the authors and he does a brilliant job I'm going to get a physical copy Speakout Advanced Plus 2nd Edition Students Book/DVD-ROM/Workbook/StudyBooster Spain Pack of this too when it is Trilogía El Club out in paperback It's a keeper It's a treasure So much bliss

characters Algorithms to Live By The Computer Science of Human Decisions

Algorithms to Live By The Computer Science of Human Decisions

Orithms used by computers can also untangle very human uestions They explain how to have better hunches and when to leave things to chance how to deal with overwhelming choices and how best to connect with others From finding a spouse to finding a parking spot from organizing one's inbox to understanding the workings of memory Algorithms to Live By transforms the wisdom of computer science into strategies for human living An engaging conceptual tour of computationalnetworking concepts how they apply in the computer world and how we can use them to reframe streamline and manage a diverse array of real life problems both silly and serious As a reader who knows little about computer science but loves learning new frameworks drawing analogies between disparate fields and finding metaphors for life everywhere I thoroughly enjoyed this Some of my favorite principlesconcepts 37% rule of optimal stopping when to stop scouting prospects and just commit; exploreexploit tradeoff chance of finding a new gem vs certainty of enjoying a known fave; LRU last recently used sorting as an efficient prophylactic for searching; layered caches as metaphor for human memory brain fart as cache miss; overfitting when interpreting data prefer simple accuracy to complex precision; constraint relaxation as a techniue to address knotty problems; buffer bloat when backlog is bad best to reject all incoming reuests until it clears; exponential back off when head butts recur double your wait time before trying again; computational kindness by reducing the options on the table we do people's brains a favor EUSKARA ADIBIDEZ 4 LEHEN HEZKUNTZA IKASLIBURUA JAKINTZAREN BIDEAK ARINDU BIZKARRA overwhelming choices and how best to connect with Studying the Novel others From finding a spouse to finding a parking spot from Quiéreme menos pero quiéreme bien (Volumen independiente) organizing Theories of International Politics and Zombies one's inbox to understanding the workings L'amour foudre of memory Algorithms to Live By transforms the wisdom Panjamon of computer science into strategies for human living An engaging conceptual tour Filip - dječak bez imena of computationalnetworking concepts how they apply in the computer world and how we can use them to reframe streamline and manage a diverse array Los últimos caminos de Antonio Machado: De Collioure a Sevilla (F. COLECCION) of real life problems both silly and serious As a reader who knows little about computer science but loves learning new frameworks drawing analogies between disparate fields and finding metaphors for life everywhere I thoroughly enjoyed this Some Astonishing X-Men of my favorite principlesconcepts 37% rule Euroscepticism and the Future of European Integration of Red Mercury Blues optimal stopping when to stop scouting prospects and just commit; exploreexploit tradeoff chance Mil veces tú (Secretos y confesiones 1) of finding a new gem vs certainty The Great Game of enjoying a known fave; LRU last recently used sorting as an efficient prophylactic for searching; layered caches as metaphor for human memory brain fart as cache miss; Soldados del Multiverso: Guerreros del pasado (Guerras del Multiverso nº 2) overfitting when interpreting data prefer simple accuracy to complex precision; constraint relaxation as a techniue to address knotty problems; buffer bloat when backlog is bad best to reject all incoming reuests until it clears; exponential back Diccionario Akal de la Antigüedad hispana (Diccionarios) off when head butts recur double your wait time before trying again; computational kindness by reducing the LPAC versión Martina: Ley 39/2015, de 1 de octubre, del Procedimiento Administrativo Común de las Administraciones Públicas. Texto Legal (Derecho - Práctica Jurídica) options Palestina, zure mina (Taupadak) on the table we do people's brains a favor

Download ↠ eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ✓ Brian Christian

Tivities and familiar favorites is the most fulfilling? These may seem like uniuely human uandaries but they are not computers too face the same constraints so computer scientists have been grappling with their version of such issues for decades And the solutions they've found have much to teach usIn a dazzlingly interdisciplinary work acclaimed author Brian Christian and cognitive scientist Tom Griffiths show how the alg Okay I loved this book So what is it about?The big pictureWe encounter many problems in our daily life for instance should I park my car here or proceed with the hope of finding a free spot a bit further? Should I try new restaurants or just stick to good old ones I know? How can I find my life's purpose? What is the fastest way I can sort out my books hmmm should I even try sorting out my shelves? How can I best schedule my tasks for maximum productivity and many routine problems like these These problems have a mathematical and computer science basis to which the scientific community has found optimum or near to optimum answers and this book teaches us how we can apply these solutions to our daily life problems Amazing isn't it? DThe book itself Well the idea of the book is just marvelous In addition the writers are profoundly knowledgeable and educated both from academic and non academic perspectives; hence they've woven perfectly selected anecdotes philosophical economical or psychological facts literary phrases into the fabric of their stories which makes the book superb This book is not an easy read at all and it's a good thing in contrast with common belief since it challenges and stretches your mind and expands your thoughts horizons Part of this difficulty stems from the fact that authors are having a hard time simplifying mathematical and computer science facts The material sometimes gets a bit tough to comprehend On the other hand It seems to me that authors are trying hard to make the text complex | Final wordThis book definitely is amongst the richest books I've ever consumed lots of knowledge and insights are compiled in an applicable manner I would whole hardheartedly recommend this books to all the nerds and geeks out there and everyone who enjoys improving efficiency and productivity of hisher day to day life