To Conuer Hell The Meuse Argonne 1918 Read & Download ´ 107

Edward G. Lengel æ 7 Summary

Son gas In thirty six hours he said the Doughboys would crack the German defenses and open the road to Berlin Six weeks later after savage fighting across swamps forests towns and rugged hills the battle finally ended with the signing of the armistice that concluded the First World War The Meuse Argonne had fallen at the cost of than 120000 American casualties including 26000 dead In the bloodiest battle the co I tend not to read books where I know the ending I was well aware this was the final battle of the war and that the Allies were victorious As my grandfather was killed on the first day of this battle I thought it fit that I should read this now as part of my commemoration of the centenary of the Armistice Fought over a period of forty seven days from September 26 to November 11 1918 the Meuse Argonne sucked in 12 million American soldiers leaving 26277 of them dead and 95786 wounded Almost all of these casualties came in a period of about three weeks of heavy fighting and they amounted to about half of the total American casualties for the warNo single battle in American military history before or since even approaches the Meuse Argonne in size and cost and it was without uestion the country’s most critical military contribution to the Allied cause in the First World WarIt may have been the most critical military contribution but we should recognize that by the time of the Meusse Argonne Germany was mostly a defeated army Still Germany had held this territory since 1914 despite the Allies efforts to dislodge the German army It was important that Germany finally be defeated here their last true strongholdI was disgusted at the egotism of the American generals and their failure even to try to learn from both the British and the French Those two nations did not understand modern warfare at the beginning of the war and it took them uite some time to finally understand that sending men over the top into the face of machine guns and artillery would simply yield a horrendous number of dead soldiers The British suffered nearly 20000 fatalities on a single day July 1 1916 in the Battle of the Somme I was frustrated that General Black Jack Pershing thought himself so much better than they that he couldn't have even ventured the observation that men with rifles and bayonets and a will to win were simply not enoughAs a battlefield general Pershing had been mediocre His management of the Meuse Argonne offensive had been uncreative and his understanding of tactics remained rooted in the nineteenth century His obsession with the cult of the offensive had shattered several American divisions and sacrificed thousands of men for victories that a little creativity and forethought might have won cheaplySome of this is very dry telling of this division attacking a hill or that division attacking a town But interspersed were paragraphs of stories of individuals Some of the individuals were revisited in subseuent chapters There were uotes from war diaries some by the generals with the big egos others by the rank and file whose observations were valuable There was a concluding chapter that told of how the soldiers faired in homecoming I have a hard time rating this It was a personal read for me even though the action took place after my personal connection ceased to exist I learned a lot I'm giving it 4 stars but only just and it wouldn't surprise me if others didn't think of it so highly La ética de la crueldad including 26000 dead In the bloodiest battle the co I tend not to read books where I know the ending I was well aware this was the final battle of the war and that the Allies were victorious As my grandfather was killed on the first day of this battle I thought 3052 it fit that I should read this now as part of my commemoration of the centenary of the Armistice Fought over a period of forty seven days from September 26 to November 11 1918 the Meuse Argonne sucked Intégrale Gunnm Last Order Other Stories in 12 million American soldiers leaving 26277 of them dead and 95786 wounded Almost all of these casualties came Mercator in a period of about three weeks of heavy fighting and they amounted to about half of the total American casualties for the warNo single battle Pasos perdidos en Granada in American military history before or since even approaches the Meuse Argonne Suffering and no suffering in size and cost and Can We Live 150 Years? it was without uestion the country’s most critical military contribution to the Allied cause The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears in the First World WarIt may have been the most critical military contribution but we should recognize that by the time of the Meusse Argonne Germany was mostly a defeated army Still Germany had held this territory since 1914 despite the Allies efforts to dislodge the German army It was Robs Shiny Dumptruck important that Germany finally be defeated here their last true strongholdI was disgusted at the egotism of the American generals and their failure even to try to learn from both the British and the French Those two nations did not understand modern warfare at the beginning of the war and Business English it took them uite some time to finally understand that sending men over the top Roller Girl into the face of machine guns and artillery would simply yield a horrendous number of dead soldiers The British suffered nearly 20000 fatalities on a single day July 1 1916 Mama Glow in the Battle of the Somme I was frustrated that General Black Jack Pershing thought himself so much better than they that he couldn't have even ventured the observation that men with rifles and bayonets and a will to win were simply not enoughAs a battlefield general Pershing had been mediocre His management of the Meuse Argonne offensive had been uncreative and his understanding of tactics remained rooted Fire in the Sky in the nineteenth century His obsession with the cult of the offensive had shattered several American divisions and sacrificed thousands of men for victories that a little creativity and forethought might have won cheaplySome of this olga spessivtzeva is very dry telling of this division attacking a hill or that division attacking a town But ¡Que vengan cuando quieran! interspersed were paragraphs of stories of I Am Providence individuals Some of the An Unexpected Magick (The Draegan Lords, individuals were revisited The Weirdest Noob (The Weirdest Noob in subseuent chapters There were uotes from war diaries some by the generals with the big egos others by the rank and file whose observations were valuable There was a concluding chapter that told of how the soldiers faired WeVe Only Just Begun in homecoming I have a hard time rating this It was a personal read for me even though the action took place after my personal connection ceased to exist I learned a lot I'm giving Real Estate Mistakes it 4 stars but only just and Computer Network Time Synchronization it wouldn't surprise me Lara Croft, Tomb Raider (Lara Croft: Tomb Raider if others didn't think of Ignition it so highly

Free download Ú eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB æ Edward G. Lengel

To Conuer Hell The Meuse Argonne 1918

Untry had ever seen an entire generation of young Americans had been transformed forever To Conuer Hell is gripping in its accounts of combat studded with portraits of remarkable soldiers like Pershing Harry Truman George Patton and Alvin York and authoritative in presenting the big picture It is military history of the first rank and incredibly the first in depth account of this fascinating and important battl This book is really important to me First it is the definitive account of the battle in the Meuse Argonne Second and importantly my dad's oldest brother Raymonde was killed in this fight In August Raymonde's unit the 86th Div moved to New York where its elements shipped out to France between 22 Aug and 9 Sep There is a reference to the 343rd being at St Loubes France The 86th had hoped to go into action as an integral unit However that was not to be and the 86th was essentially used as a manpower pool to fill other divisions which had suffered combat losses Raymond found himself in Company K 309th Infantry of the 78th Division probably in late Sep or early Oct 1918 On 16 Oct the 78th joined the fight in the Meuse Argonne at Grandpre France on the banks of the Aire River According to Lengel's account the 78th was ‘green’ and had not really been tested under fire Known as the ‘Lightening’ Div it had moved into battle lines during the night of Oct 15th and was ordered into the attack at 0600 on 16 Oct The term ‘fog of war’ literally came into play The 78th was to have been guided into battle lines by soldiers of the 77th Div which was already in the fight But almost all of the 77th guides failed to carry out this assignment due to fog and rain on the night of the 15th There were other complicating factors and the 78th probably should not have been ordered in but the order to attack was not rescinded Raymond’s unit the 309th was on the right of the attacking formation Lengel recounts what followed Crossing the Aire on footbridges near St Juvin they advanced across the open ground below the Bois des Logs and Champigneulle They moved forward in short rushes and as men fell to long range machine gun fire and artillery fire their neighbors moved over to fill the gaps The enemy fire increased as the infantry approached their objectives obscuring the lines with the smoke and debris of exploding shells for minutes at a time as the troops retreated down slope out of the clouds then rallied by their officers turned and rushed back in This went on for much of the day until the attack stalled on a line parallel with Hill 182 north of St Juvin It is almost certain that this is the action during which Raymond was killed So yeah that's why this book means a lot to me Some have criticized this book as being too detailed and as being too heavily weighted to eye witness accounts For me that is the book's strength If you want to know what it was like for the 'grunts' in WW I this is your book

Read & Download To Conuer Hell The Meuse Argonne 1918

The authoritative dramatic and previously untold story of the bloodiest battle in American history the epic fight for the Meuse Argonne in World War I On September 26 1918 than one million American soldiers prepared to assault the German held Meuse Argonne region of France Their commander General John J Pershing believed in the superiority of American guts over barbed wire machine guns massed artillery and poi A ok book but it could have been far better Endless repetition of the same stock phrases the attacked jumped off at 500am make one thrust indistinguishable from another This is amplified by the paucity of maps and those included are of such poor uality as to be nearly uselessIn the first attack General Pershing tactical and strategic idiot with no knowlege of modern warfare He thought failure of will was at fault for his green Divisions' inability to break well placed German machine gum Maxim nests with interlocking fields of fire The untried Colonels and Lieutenant Colonels were little better if regulars their last combat experience typically was San Juan Hill; if National Guard their last combat experience was the stylized drama of representing clients in a Courtroom Interestingly the author of the attack's logistical plan was Colonel George C Marshall There were some brave and competent field and company grade officers who led from the front; many of them got shot in the front To be fair having been handed weapons at best two weeks before battle little or no training as opposed to parading was possible Also officers were given senseless orders to attack at all costs without knowlege of local terrain or resistance Flung into the attack almost as soon as they arrived alongside officers and men who did not know their names and clutching rifles they could not load many died without firing a shot And no one had been trained sufficiently in attacking machine gun emplacements sometimes a bayonet won't doAs a result the Doggies and Marines had spirit whoops élan And their arrival changed the balance of numbers on the Western Front decisively But at a frightening cost as a Sargent of the Missouri Kansas Division recountedThe outfit looked terrible and I knew just how they felt exhausted sleepy hungry worn down and sick worse they didn't feel lucky any They'd lost the soldier's bullet proof ego the feeling that others may get hit bit I never I know how they felt because I felt the same way Not even the clowns were wisecracking any Apart from Captain Harry S Truman American Artillery was thoroughly outclassed by the Pickelhaubes Having the advantage of defense the Germans had registered many points along lines of the US attack to deadly effect from moment of any attackAt the beginning of the advance Lieutenant Maury later San Antonio Congressman Maverick's company numbered two hundred men A few minutes after the attack started half of them were dead or wounded As the last remaining officer he took command of the company The next highest ranking soldier was a corporalDennis Nolan a one star intel officer who relieved the commander of the 28th Division's 55th Brigade comes off well


10 thoughts on “To Conuer Hell The Meuse Argonne 1918

  1. says:

    Never fight the Russians in their snow – or the Germans in a forest stronghold In 9 AD in the depths of the Teutoberg Forest a confederacy of Germanic tribes ambushed and annihilated a force of three Roman legions read about the battle in Schama’s Landscape and Memory and you will have Anselm Kiefer nightmares; in the fall and winter of 1944 a number of US divisions bled out in the Hürtgen Forest where the Germans had nested machine gun teams in cunningly camouflaged log redoubts and artillery that fired into the treetops to make “airbursts” of razor sharp of splinters In the fall of 1918 the US First Army did manage to crack the three lines of German fortification – each line was named after a witch in Wagner’s Ring – laid across the steep wooded hills of the Meuse river valley and the muddy misty ravines of the Argonne Forest; but the victory took six weeks and cost 26000 dead and over 100000 wounded The largest US military cemetery in France isn’t in Normandy it’s in the Meuse Argonne Those are small numbers by the standards of the Western Front – the British lost 19000 killed on the first fucking day of the Somme – but the American wastage stood out then and stands out to historians now because many of the casualties can be directly traced to US officers’ inexperience and ignorant pigheaded disdain of French and British advice The commander of the American Expeditionary Force John J “Black Jack” Pershing actually thought his troops were stronger and braver than the supposedly timid trench cowering Europeans and that the vaunted American rifleman striding across No Man’s Land with his bayonet fixed and his aim sure could overcome the barbed wire machine guns gas and artillery barrages all the innovations of war that had stopped the British and French the previous three years Lengel describes US troops being shot down while struggling to cut through belts of wire already hung with skeletons in tattered French uniforms You can imagine how that went – static butchery Chauvinism much like Pershing’s had allowed three generations of European officers to ignore the data of the American Civil War and of their own colonial wars – namely that the range and accuracy of the infantryman’s rifle and the rapid fire of the machine gun made frontal wave attacks against an entrenched defender suicidal I suppose the lesson or epigram is that war is progressive Grant and combat an incommunicable obscenity revealed only to participants – and even participants forget or pretend to Bruce Catton wrote somewhere that he was no aware of the realities of war for having been raised around mangled American Civil War veterans because those men with their vast authority had acuiesced to their celebration by mass media imagery – “the picture book war” – that was romantically false Charles Royster pointed out that even the grimmest war writers pull some of their punches if only for their own sanity If veterans did not all write of the war as Bierce did at his most scathing or if Bierce DeForest and other critics of romanticizing failed to draw the darkest conclusions from their portraits of war their restraint did not necessarily arise from self deception or cowardice They had to live with the war Even Bierce connoisseur of death did so for fifty years I skimmed some of this book Reading military history I'm usually able to keep in mind topographical features and unit dispositions but I’ve been an irritable reader recently I didn’t abandon To Conuer Hell because I’ve always wanted to know how the US raised a million man modern army shipped it to France and supplied trained and deployed it decisively – all in 18 months The answer is just barely During the first four days of the Meuse Argonne offensive the frontline troops had to eat captured German rations and drink pooled rainwater Many of the draftee replacements hadn’t been taught to fire their rifles – they were just bodies a helpless weight of flesh pushed against the enemy Red Army style The planes tanks artillery and most of the light machine guns were French made It seems that if it had not been for First Army chief of staff George C Marshall later architect of US mobilization in WWII and the nominal rebuilder of postwar Europe the thing wouldn’t have come off at all I’m also morbidly fascinated by forest fighting – snipers in the treetops patrols that blunder into each other in foggy clearings and dissolve into “point blank melees” of barking pistols rifles swung as clubs shotgun blasts and the swoop of trench knives And I never skimmed over the individual stories many of which make the always wounded but never incapacitated action movie hero seem not so far fetched Pershing was right in a way – his soldiers were excellent but only insofar as they ignored his tactics and adapted their killing skills to the tasks before them belly to the dirt tasks like infiltration of enemy lines and the patient outflanking and neutralization of machine gun nests Jake Barkley mostly bald from mustard gas burns to his scalp picked up a German light machine gun and retreated to the hulk of a knocked out tank; from that one man fortress he held off an entire German battalion Caribou hunter Samuel Woodfill crept around German machine gun nests and shot down the gunners and jumped into a German trench where finding his45 jammed he reached for the nearest implement – and began killing Germans with a pickaxe Tennessee tavern brawler turned born again pacifist turned reluctant draftee Alvin York knew from wild turkey hunts how to shoot down the suad of Germans which suddenly rose from cover and charged him from 25 yards away I teched off the sixth man first; then the fifth; then the fourth; then the third; and so on That’s the way we shoot wild turkeys at home You see we don’t want the front ones to know that we’re getting the back ones and then they keep on coming until we get them all Of course I hadn’t time to think of that I guess I jes naturally did it I knowed too that if the front ones wavered or if I stopped them the rear ones would drop down and pump a volley into me and get me


  2. says:

    A ok book but it could have been far better Endless repetition of the same stock phrases the attacked jumped off at 500am make one thrust indistinguishable from another This is amplified by the paucity of maps and those included are of such poor uality as to be nearly uselessIn the first attack General Pershing tactical and strategic idiot with no knowlege of modern warfare He thought failure of will was at fault for his green Divisions' inability to break well placed German machine gum Maxim nests with interlocking fields of fire The untried Colonels and Lieutenant Colonels were little better if regulars their last combat experience typically was San Juan Hill; if National Guard their last combat experience was the stylized drama of representing clients in a Courtroom Interestingly the author of the attack's logistical plan was Colonel George C Marshall There were some brave and competent field and company grade officers who led from the front; many of them got shot in the front To be fair having been handed weapons at best two weeks before battle little or no training as opposed to parading was possible Also officers were given senseless orders to attack at all costs without knowlege of local terrain or resistance Flung into the attack almost as soon as they arrived alongside officers and men who did not know their names and clutching rifles they could not load many died without firing a shot And no one had been trained sufficiently in attacking machine gun emplacements sometimes a bayonet won't doAs a result the Doggies and Marines had spirit whoops élan And their arrival changed the balance of numbers on the Western Front decisively But at a frightening cost as a Sargent of the Missouri Kansas Division recountedThe outfit looked terrible and I knew just how they felt exhausted sleepy hungry worn down and sick worse they didn't feel lucky any They'd lost the soldier's bullet proof ego the feeling that others may get hit bit I never I know how they felt because I felt the same way Not even the clowns were wisecracking any Apart from Captain Harry S Truman American Artillery was thoroughly outclassed by the Pickelhaubes Having the advantage of defense the Germans had registered many points along lines of the US attack to deadly effect from moment of any attackAt the beginning of the advance Lieutenant Maury later San Antonio Congressman Maverick's company numbered two hundred men A few minutes after the attack started half of them were dead or wounded As the last remaining officer he took command of the company The next highest ranking soldier was a corporalDennis Nolan a one star intel officer who relieved the commander of the 28th Division's 55th Brigade comes off well


  3. says:

    This is the best book on the Muese Argonne campaign I've read There are a lot of first person accounts that really help you to know what the Doughboys went through Until I read this I really had no idea some Doughboys were rushed through training so fast they didn't even know how to shot a rifle The doctrine preached by Pershing was the offensive Guts got you results than artillery or machine gun support Pershings view was his allies were soft from spending to much time in the trenches This philosophy led to many costly attacks that were thrown at the German lines with heavy casualties The AEF still had a lot to learn and was still learning when the war ended This book does a good job of explaining the campaign and in large part the whole experience of the AEF in this last campaign of the war The one drawback to the book I felt was I wish there were maps


  4. says:

    Definitely worth wading through the 400 plus pages Detailed account of America's main battle on the western front I thought it lacked some historical context and didn't make much reference to what had been going on for the previous three years before the Americans turned up but that would easily have added another 100 pages One bit in particular stands out some American troops enter a dug out and from deep in the darkness an American soldier asks them if they have come to arrest him? No they say they're just looking for food He says he's a coward and is too scared to go out there any That's OK they replied we understand good luck


  5. says:

    This is a military history of Meuse Argonne battle that America fought in WWI against the Germans It was the major battle that the US engaged in and was key to the German defeat in November of 1918 This book is a long and detailed description of the months long engagement It describes bayonet fights artillery shelling machine gunfire sources of soldiers describing specific fights and the carnage It is long and detailed About 100000 US troops died here Germany however after fighting for four years could no longer withstand new supply of Americans showing up in 1918 with the American economy revved up behind them A very detailed description of the American contribution to this war


  6. says:

    I tend not to read books where I know the ending I was well aware this was the final battle of the war and that the Allies were victorious As my grandfather was killed on the first day of this battle I thought it fit that I should read this now as part of my commemoration of the centenary of the Armistice Fought over a period of forty seven days from September 26 to November 11 1918 the Meuse Argonne sucked in 12 million American soldiers leaving 26277 of them dead and 95786 wounded Almost all of these casualties came in a period of about three weeks of heavy fighting and they amounted to about half of the total American casualties for the warNo single battle in American military history before or since even approaches the Meuse Argonne in size and cost and it was without uestion the country’s most critical military contribution to the Allied cause in the First World WarIt may have been the most critical military contribution but we should recognize that by the time of the Meusse Argonne Germany was mostly a defeated army Still Germany had held this territory since 1914 despite the Allies efforts to dislodge the German army It was important that Germany finally be defeated here their last true strongholdI was disgusted at the egotism of the American generals and their failure even to try to learn from both the British and the French Those two nations did not understand modern warfare at the beginning of the war and it took them uite some time to finally understand that sending men over the top into the face of machine guns and artillery would simply yield a horrendous number of dead soldiers The British suffered nearly 20000 fatalities on a single day July 1 1916 in the Battle of the Somme I was frustrated that General Black Jack Pershing thought himself so much better than they that he couldn't have even ventured the observation that men with rifles and bayonets and a will to win were simply not enoughAs a battlefield general Pershing had been mediocre His management of the Meuse Argonne offensive had been uncreative and his understanding of tactics remained rooted in the nineteenth century His obsession with the cult of the offensive had shattered several American divisions and sacrificed thousands of men for victories that a little creativity and forethought might have won cheaplySome of this is very dry telling of this division attacking a hill or that division attacking a town But interspersed were paragraphs of stories of individuals Some of the individuals were revisited in subseuent chapters There were uotes from war diaries some by the generals with the big egos others by the rank and file whose observations were valuable There was a concluding chapter that told of how the soldiers faired in homecoming I have a hard time rating this It was a personal read for me even though the action took place after my personal connection ceased to exist I learned a lot I'm giving it 4 stars but only just and it wouldn't surprise me if others didn't think of it so highly


  7. says:

    This book is really important to me First it is the definitive account of the battle in the Meuse Argonne Second and importantly my dad's oldest brother Raymonde was killed in this fight In August Raymonde's unit the 86th Div moved to New York where its elements shipped out to France between 22 Aug and 9 Sep There is a reference to the 343rd being at St Loubes France The 86th had hoped to go into action as an integral unit However that was not to be and the 86th was essentially used as a manpower pool to fill other divisions which had suffered combat losses Raymond found himself in Company K 309th Infantry of the 78th Division probably in late Sep or early Oct 1918 On 16 Oct the 78th joined the fight in the Meuse Argonne at Grandpre France on the banks of the Aire River According to Lengel's account the 78th was ‘green’ and had not really been tested under fire Known as the ‘Lightening’ Div it had moved into battle lines during the night of Oct 15th and was ordered into the attack at 0600 on 16 Oct The term ‘fog of war’ literally came into play The 78th was to have been guided into battle lines by soldiers of the 77th Div which was already in the fight But almost all of the 77th guides failed to carry out this assignment due to fog and rain on the night of the 15th There were other complicating factors and the 78th probably should not have been ordered in but the order to attack was not rescinded Raymond’s unit the 309th was on the right of the attacking formation Lengel recounts what followed Crossing the Aire on footbridges near St Juvin they advanced across the open ground below the Bois des Logs and Champigneulle They moved forward in short rushes and as men fell to long range machine gun fire and artillery fire their neighbors moved over to fill the gaps The enemy fire increased as the infantry approached their objectives obscuring the lines with the smoke and debris of exploding shells for minutes at a time as the troops retreated down slope out of the clouds then rallied by their officers turned and rushed back in This went on for much of the day until the attack stalled on a line parallel with Hill 182 north of St Juvin It is almost certain that this is the action during which Raymond was killed So yeah that's why this book means a lot to me Some have criticized this book as being too detailed and as being too heavily weighted to eye witness accounts For me that is the book's strength If you want to know what it was like for the 'grunts' in WW I this is your book


  8. says:

    An addictive readable account of US action in World War One It presents personal accounts of soldiers from generals to privates which highlighted the disconnect Army leadership had from the actual conditions on the front Like another reviewer noted maps would have been useful Otherwise a great book


  9. says:

    This bookś theme is a digust due to at the time American generals did not care for the loss of human life by throwing men at enemy lines


  10. says:

    An interesting book on the final campaign of World War I I enjoyed how certain events tied in to the campaign From Charles Whittlsey's Lost Battalion to Alvin C York this book tells of the horrors of trench warfare and the newly developed weapons that were used such as gas and the airplane


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