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Y undetected until now personalized filters are sweeping the Web creating individual universes of information for each of us Facebook the primary news source for an increasing number of Americans prioritizes the links it believes will appeal to you so that if you are a liberal you can expect to see only progressive links Even an old media bastion like The Washington Post devotes the top of its home page to a news feed with the links your Facebook friends are sharing Behind the scenes a burgeoning industry of data companies is tracking your personal information to sell to advertisers from your political leanings to the color you painted your living room to the hiking boots you just browsed on ZapposIn a personalized world we will increasingly be typed a Very interesting book Here are the notes I wrote in the margins while reading it on the Kindle Page 15Note This is why I love going to libraries The chance encounter of a new topic you never thought of exploring 256 Page 17Note I need to go to town hall meetings 279 Page 20Notes on this intro I don't mind companies targeting me as I live my life much with a transparent attitude However the author makes very good point that we each end up in or own bubble Now all this info gathering is what I totally want our strategy to be at work we need to know our customer I blows my mind that ppl don't see that at work or don't care 316 Page 29uote “When you log in after a day reading Kindle e books at the beach is able to subtly customize its site to appeal to what you’ve read”Note Ha I'm reading this on a kindle app now Hi 423 Page 49uote Now all that was changing One executive in the marketing session was especially blunt “The publishers are losing” he said “and they will lose because they just don’t get it”Note So true This carries over to the syndication world as well Ppl don't get that you have to make your content reach a demographic Your content can't just be general generalness any like how newspapers behave 661 Page 83uote Stumbling on Happiness author Dan Gilbert presents volumes of data to demonstrate that we’re terrible at figuring out what makes us happyNote But God knows 1080 Page 85uote ensure that we aren’t constantly seeing the world anewNote I wonder if I have poor schema cuz I often see the world anew Or perhaps my schemata is flexible Or maybe I have a bunch able to be referenced like a library Hmmm I think it's the flexible one I don't have a deep library brain My brain is not strong in brute force but nimble and flexible 1099 Page 85uote Schemata can actually get in the way of our ability to directly observe what’s happeningNote What we called in art critiues baggage the viewer brings 1105 Page 91uote contents But to feel curiosity we have to be conscious that something’s being hiddenNote Kinda like how I'm going to start hanging the what is your treasure tag outside the treasure chests 1175 Page 91uote Stripped of the surprise of unexpected events and associations a perfectly filtered world would provoke less learning And there’s another mental balance that personalization can upset the balance between open mindedness and focus that makes us creativeNote Yes The flexible mind for creativity It makes me thankful that right after college I made it a goal to live a creative life and to show others how to live creatively I researched and devoured books on creativity It makes me glad that I did that at a young age it set me up to be where I'm now and where I'm going 1185 Page 92uote Stripped of the surprise of unexpected events and associations a perfectly filtered world would provoke less learning And there’s another mental balance that personalization can upset the balance between open mindedness and focus that makes us creativeNote Whoa Adderall cuts down creativity? AWAY ADDERALL AWAY 1191 Page 93uote Farah the director of the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Cognitive Neuroscience has bigger worries “I’m a little concerned that we could be raising a generation of very focused accountants”Note Lol our poor accountants 1202 Page 93uote definition ingenuity comes from the juxtaposition of ideas that are far apart and relevance comes from finding ideas that are similarNote Long live wikipedia and its abilities to make us curious about random topics 1206 Page 93uote “By definition ingenuity comes from the juxtaposition of ideas that are far apart and relevance comes from finding ideas that are similar”Note Hmmm interesting point I agree on that definition of ingenuitycreativity but couldn't creativity also be bringing together relevant things? Or am I watering down what creativity is? 1210 Page 99uote One could tie a string to the barometer lower it and measure the string—thinking of the instrument as a “thing with weight” The unamused instructorNote Ha 1286 Page 100uote Avoid smartass physicists But the episode also explains why Bohr was such a brilliant innovator His ability to see objects and concepts in many different ways made it easier for him to use them to solve problemsNote It's too bad there are so many narrow minded But that doesn't bother me much I can stil do my creative thing 1293 Page 100uote The kind of categorical openness that supports creativity also correlates with certain kinds of luck While science has yet to find that there are people whom the universe favors—ask people to guess a random number and we’re all about eually bad at it—there are some traits that people who consider themselves to be lucky share They’re open to new experiences and new people They’re also distractableNote Lol I'm distractible I wonder how many of the hundred of people here so intently focused on the music are distractable 1296 Page 102uote Creative environments often rely on “liuid networks” where different ideas can collide in different configurationsNote This is SO why I want flexible workspaces at work 1315 Page 121uote an awful day in the near future Pandora might know to preload Pretty Hate Machine for you when you arriveNote If I'm in a bad mood I want to hear something positive I don't want to continue in my rut That's like being stuck in a pit and not coming out there's a Scripture reference about the pit in Psalms 1552 Page 121uote it can also be used to take advantage of your psychologyNote It goes to show that you choose your mood Circumstances can be hard but ultimately you choose how to handle it Lke in James are you a ship that is tossed to and fro by every prevailing wind? Your attitude is determined by choices made over a period of time 1552 Page 122uote spring for the slicer dicer that they’d never purchase in the light of dayNote I see what he's saying but 3am is the least likely time I would buy I want to do research first I don't fear this at all Bu it does suck for those who are prone 1558 Page 122uote it’s not such a stretch to imagine political campaigns targeting voters at times Note Notice the proliferation of political tv shows on Sunday mornings the time when we spend worshipping what is most important to us 1565 Page 123 124uote your phone should figure out what you would like to be searching for before you do In the fast approachingNote Ha Right my mind is way too all over the place when I'm walking around public BUT I wouldn't mind hearing interesting trivia about certain places It would also be neat to have a record of al the places I've placed public art for people to see even after it's gone 1579 Page 124uote Westen a neuropsychologist whose focus is on political persuasion demonstrates the strength of this priming effect by asking a group of people to memorize a list of words that include moon and ocean A few minutes later he changes topics and asks the group which detergent they prefer Though he hasn’t mentioned the word the group’s show of hands indicates a strong preference for TideNote Is that because Tide has a logo shaped like the moon or because it's the moontide moving thing? Maybe I use Tide because I tend to do my laundry at night rolls eyes 1590 Page 126uote Though there are people whose posts you’re far interested in it’s her posts that you seeNote I totally want to be able to control this That's why I set up lists but it doesn't show all that I want 1606 The Three Fat Women of Antibes and Gigolo and Gigolette individual universes of Un amor fora ciutat information for each of us Facebook the primary news source for an The Forest of Souls increasing number of Americans prioritizes the links Cuckold Erotica it believes will appeal to you so that Osnovy Uchebnogo Akademicheskogo Risunka if you are a liberal you can expect to see only progressive links Even an old media bastion like The Washington Post devotes the top of ¿Amor o Venganza? (Spanish Edition) its home page to a news feed with the links your Facebook friends are sharing Behind the scenes a burgeoning All Dogs Bite (Club Chrome, industry of data companies A Search for the King is tracking your personal Varney, the Vampyre information to sell to advertisers from your political leanings to the color you painted your living room to the hiking boots you just browsed on ZapposIn a personalized world we will The Midwife (The Pocket Watch Chronicles, increasingly be typed a Very Speciarium (Cooking) interesting book Here are the notes I wrote Jupiter (Eismond 5) in the margins while reading The Master Shark's Mate (Fire & Rescue Shifters Book 5) it on the Kindle Page 15Note This Sergeant Chip and Other Novellas is why I love going to libraries The chance encounter of a new topic you never thought of exploring 256 Page 17Note I need to go to town hall meetings 279 Page 20Notes on this Journey Into Darkness intro I don't mind companies targeting me as I live my life much with a transparent attitude However the author makes very good point that we each end up Paléo Nutrition in or own bubble Now all this Bible Enlightened info gathering For Members Only is what I totally want our strategy to be at work we need to know our customer I blows my mind that ppl don't see that at work or don't care 316 Page 29uote “When you log About a Girl in after a day reading Kindle e books at the beach Über ein Mädchen is able to subtly customize Hero its site to appeal to what you’ve read”Note Ha I'm reading this on a kindle app now Hi 423 Page 49uote Now all that was changing One executive TELEVISION, REALIZACIÓN Y LENGUAJE AUDIOVISUAL, 3ª EDICIÓN in the marketing session was especially blunt “The publishers are losing” he said “and they will lose because they just don’t get Blind Aphrodite it”Note So true This carries over to the syndication world as well Ppl don't get that you have to make your content reach a demographic Your content can't just be general generalness any like how newspapers behave 661 Page 83uote Stumbling on Happiness author Dan Gilbert presents volumes of data to demonstrate that we’re terrible at figuring out what makes us happyNote But God knows 1080 Page 85uote ensure that we aren’t constantly seeing the world anewNote I wonder A Fate Worse Than Death and More Fright with a Bite if I have poor schema cuz I often see the world anew Or perhaps my schemata Ascent of Woman is flexible Or maybe I have a bunch able to be referenced like a library Hmmm I think ANATOMÍA DEL ENTRENAMIENTO DE LA FUERZA CON EL PROPIO PESO CORPORAL (En Forma (tutor)) it's the flexible one I don't have a deep library brain My brain Primal Island: A Bimbo Harem Adventure is not strong Meu Pé de Laranja Lima in brute force but nimble and flexible 1099 Page 85uote Schemata can actually get La primera reina tolteca in the way of our ability to directly observe what’s happeningNote What we called La primera reina tolteca in the way of our ability to directly observe what’s happeningNote What we called Disaster and Resistance is your treasure tag outside the treasure chests 1175 Page 91uote Stripped of the surprise of unexpected events and associations a perfectly filtered world would provoke less learning And there’s another mental balance that personalization can upset the balance between open mindedness and focus that makes us creativeNote Yes The flexible mind for creativity It makes me thankful that right after college I made Continental Contract (The Executioner, it a goal to live a creative life and to show others how to live creatively I researched and devoured books on creativity It makes me glad that I did that at a young age Stories Of My Creation it set me up to be where I'm now and where I'm going 1185 Page 92uote Stripped of the surprise of unexpected events and associations a perfectly filtered world would provoke less learning And there’s another mental balance that personalization can upset the balance between open mindedness and focus that makes us creativeNote Whoa Adderall cuts down creativity? AWAY ADDERALL AWAY 1191 Page 93uote Farah the director of the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Cognitive Neuroscience has bigger worries “I’m a little concerned that we could be raising a generation of very focused accountants”Note Lol our poor accountants 1202 Page 93uote definition Fated (Baals Heart, ingenuity comes from the juxtaposition of Alinka - Unikurkialan tarinoita ideas that are far apart and relevance comes from finding Vitez zatočnik (Miloš Obilić, ideas that are similarNote Long live wikipedia and Space, Time, and Spacetime its abilities to make us curious about random topics 1206 Page 93uote “By definition La batalla por los puentes: Arnhem 1944. La última victoria alemana en la segunda guerra mundial ingenuity comes from the juxtaposition of The Dante Chamber (The Dante Club ideas that are far apart and relevance comes from finding Het ijzige Land (De Grijze Jager, ideas that are similar”Note Hmmm El collar del tigre. Psicochamanismo y vida interesting point I agree on that definition of L'Invocateur - Livre III - Mage-Guerrier (French Edition) ingenuitycreativity but couldn't creativity also be bringing together relevant things? Or am I watering down what creativity Proudhon, Marx, Picasso is? 1210 Page 99uote One could tie a string to the barometer lower Agendabloc 2019 Spécial Pédagogie positive: Tout pour se simplifier la vie ! it and measure the string—thinking of the Inodoro Pereyra 25 (Inodoro Pereyra, instrument as a “thing with weight” The unamused La conspiracion idiota instructorNote Ha 1286 Page 100uote Avoid smartass physicists But the episode also explains why Bohr was such a brilliant Clan and Conviction (Clan Beginnings, innovator His ability to see objects and concepts Dangerously Funny in many different ways made The Broken Sword it easier for him to use them to solve problemsNote It's too bad there are so many narrow minded But that doesn't bother me much I can stil do my creative thing 1293 Page 100uote The kind of categorical openness that supports creativity also correlates with certain kinds of luck While science has yet to find that there are people whom the universe favors—ask people to guess a random number and we’re all about eually bad at Workout (Management 3.0) it—there are some traits that people who consider themselves to be lucky share They’re open to new experiences and new people They’re also distractableNote Lol I'm distractible I wonder how many of the hundred of people here so GEOGRAFIA E HISTORIA MADRID SERIE DESCUBRE 1 ESO SABER HACER - 9788468019048 intently focused on the music are distractable 1296 Page 102uote Creative environments often rely on “liuid networks” where different Guided Meditation for Beginners ideas can collide Glendaria Awakens Trilogy in different configurationsNote This Archiving Digital Photographs on Linux is SO why I want flexible workspaces at work 1315 Page 121uote an awful day Something Rotten (Thursday Next in the near future Pandora might know to preload Pretty Hate Machine for you when you arriveNote If I'm Male Order in a bad mood I want to hear something positive I don't want to continue White Gold in my rut That's like being stuck Anatomía & Tai Chi: Edición en color (Spanish Edition) in a pit and not coming out there's a Scripture reference about the pit On Strike Against God in Psalms 1552 Page 121uote Tipbook - Violin and Viola it can also be used to take advantage of your psychologyNote It goes to show that you choose your mood Circumstances can be hard but ultimately you choose how to handle Programación avanzada en JAVA it Lke Classical Music for Children in James are you a ship that Loving Brecht is tossed to and fro by every prevailing wind? Your attitude Pepe Gotera y Otilio. Chapuzas a domicilio is determined by choices made over a period of time 1552 Page 122uote spring for the slicer dicer that they’d never purchase Beast-Demon Gangbang in the light of dayNote I see what he's saying but 3am Topolino Noir is the least likely time I would buy I want to do research first I don't fear this at all Bu New Sales. Simplified. it does suck for those who are prone 1558 Page 122uote The Bag Im In it’s not such a stretch to Paroles Immortelles (Vachanamrut) imagine political campaigns targeting voters at times Note Notice the proliferation of political tv shows on Sunday mornings the time when we spend worshipping what Certain Dark Things (Alex & CJ, is most Nirvana Revealed important to us 1565 Page 123 124uote your phone should figure out what you would like to be searching for before you do In the fast approachingNote Ha Right my mind Metropolis is way too all over the place when I'm walking around public BUT I wouldn't mind hearing Back to the Lab interesting trivia about certain places It would also be neat to have a record of al the places I've placed public art for people to see even after Het schrikkelspook it's gone 1579 Page 124uote Westen a neuropsychologist whose focus Gendered Lives, Sexual Beings is on political persuasion demonstrates the strength of this priming effect by asking a group of people to memorize a list of words that Rester vivant et autres textes include moon and ocean A few minutes later he changes topics and asks the group which detergent they prefer Though he hasn’t mentioned the word the group’s show of hands Unscripted (The Scripted Series, indicates a strong preference for TideNote Is that because Tide has a logo shaped like the moon or because Perfectly Scripted (The Scripted Series, it's the moontide moving thing? Maybe I use Tide because I tend to do my laundry at night rolls eyes 1590 Page 126uote Though there are people whose posts you’re far Union League Movement in the Deep South interested The Fashion Startup Guide in La Trenza (Narrativa) it’s her posts that you seeNote I totally want to be able to control this That's why I set up lists but Hoosier Daddy it doesn't show all that I want 1606

characters The Filter Bubble What the Internet is Hiding From You

The Filter Bubble What the Internet is Hiding From You

An eye opening account of how the hidden rise of personalization on the Internet is controlling and limiting the information we consumeIn December 2009 Google began customizing its search results for each user Instead of giving you the most broadly popular result Google now tries to predict what you are most likely to click on According to MoveOnorg board president Eli Pariser Google's change in policy is symptomatic of the most significant shift to take place on the Web in recent years the rise of personalization In this groundbreaking investigation of the new hidden Web Pariser uncovers how this growing trend threatens to control how we consume and share information as a society and reveals what we can do about itThough the phenomenon has gone largel I read this book because it’s very well known because he gave a famous talk about this at a recent TED conference and because I work and do research on how people think about the information they get from the internet In the end Pariser and I both think about these things a great deal—he worries deeply and writes a book that has essentially one complaint in it His complaint? Internet companies provide personalization services that distortaffectlimit what you can see and it’s hard to know what’s NOT being shown to youHe’s right in some ways and even I worry about this But the book feels to me like a collection of essay fragments that’s been amplified to book lengthHere’s my outline of his book chapter by chapter You can see there are a number of repeated themes but not a book length argument that’s developed 1 The race for relevance personalizing software agents and personalized results are bad Why? Results might be manipulated there’s a bigger problem with companies you don’t know collecting data about you eg Acxiom2 User is the content user behavioral data what you click on what you read is being collected this info is used to drive personalized views of your internet experience this causes the reading audience to split into many smaller camps crowd decisions about what’s good is NOT very smart dull and boring topics get filtered out how will the important stuff get covered? 3 Adderall Society confirmation bias exists if you live in an info bubble isn’t everything you see confirmation? filter bubble eliminates all variant views this gives you a very biased view of the world it gives you focus which is good but it’s like someone taking Adderall implicitly bad 4 The You Loop there is an identity problem—behavior tracking doesn’t always give a rich model of you as a conseuence info is filtered for you and tends to lock in on one particular model of you5 The public is irrelevant surprise The news is manipulated the cloud is run by a small number of companies outreach eg in political campaigns is limited to those who can be influenced 6 Hello World programming is important; you need to understand how algorithms work internet use is voluntary except when you need to compete against people who use it then you're sort of pushed into it for competitive reasons 7 What you want whether you want it or not advertisers are really good at figuring how to get past your defenses 8 Escape from the city of the ghettos some ideas about ways to get around the filter bubble It’s irksome that the book is fundamentally a fairly haphazard collection of mini essays on a small number of topics that don’t make strong arguments The book has section titles like “The robot with Gaydar” and then never says anything about “Gaydar” in the section What should the reader take away from that? What about a chapter like “The Adderall Society” where the argument is a guilt by association He argues that increased focus on a task such as might be provided by a filtering mechanism is a bad thing because drugs like Adderall help some people do that Really? That’s his argument?? Or that Google’s image recognition technology is slammed because Google did NOT launch it He seems worried that such technology exists at all but drags Google into it not because they use it but that it might be possible I also have to object to his style of writing Page 201 “Google Research has captured most of the scholarly articles in the world” Did he really mean “captured” in the sense of “to take control over”? Google Scholar not Google Research provides links to much of the world’s scholarly research literature but that literature isn’t even stored on Google servers—the service is to provide an easily searchable index that gives links to the documents They’re not “captured” in any senseBut this is the way the entire book is written the language is negatively nuanced to make you feel that you’re being given an inside scoop on the evils of information filtering If you take a step back you realize that Pariser is fundamentally interested in how political ideas get munched in the filtering and personalization software He’s worried and in this I agree with him that important stuff—laws policy regulationsall that boring but deeply important political content—will be left out in a consumer interest driven information world Pariser is longing for the days when a really great editor would pick and choose what you really need to know and put it on the front page for your edification He seems to have forgotten all of the yellow journalism that preceeded the golden age of “objective” journalism and has an optimistic view that before automated information filtering and content tailoring we somehow could all easily detect sources of bias and we lived a life of pure objectivity and knowledge That is of course nonsense Everyone has always lived in a highly mediated world Libraries which we tend to think of as ultimately open and bias free information sources have ALWAYS been highly curated selectively choosing what gets included in their stacks and offerings Newspapers ALWAYS have had a political bias sometimes evident sometimes not Compare France’s Le Monde with the New York Times or with the Dallas Morning News or with the LA Times and you’ll see four very different takes on the world Pariser longs for the day when we all read the same canon of literature and daily news But note the fundamental contradiction—he worries that we’re all being pulled into separate information cells that are re confirming our beliefs and diverse in the extreme but at the same time he wants us to live in HIS filter bubble where the important that is important to him information is force fed to us whether we want it or not Is this an important book? Probably if only because it has surfaced some important issues We DO need to be aware of the filtering that is being baked into all of our information services But this has forever been thus his book reminds us that we need to take this filtering seriously especially now that the filtering is constantly changing In the end I actually agree with his recommendations that we become aware of the filters and that we take conscious action to not be simple passive consumers of everything that is wafted our way I just wish he’d written a organized argument about it and been less rhetorically inflamed by the whole thing Het schrikkelspook is controlling and limiting the Gendered Lives, Sexual Beings information we consumeIn December 2009 Google began customizing Rester vivant et autres textes its search results for each user Instead of giving you the most broadly popular result Google now tries to predict what you are most likely to click on According to MoveOnorg board president Eli Pariser Google's change Unscripted (The Scripted Series, in policy Perfectly Scripted (The Scripted Series, is symptomatic of the most significant shift to take place on the Web Union League Movement in the Deep South in recent years the rise of personalization In this groundbreaking The Fashion Startup Guide investigation of the new hidden Web Pariser uncovers how this growing trend threatens to control how we consume and share La Trenza (Narrativa) information as a society and reveals what we can do about Hoosier Daddy itThough the phenomenon has gone largel I read this book because Pirates of Spanish Main it’s very well known because he gave a famous talk about this at a recent TED conference and because I work and do research on how people think about the The Golden One (LucasFilms Alien Chronicles, information they get from the El canto del bandoneón internet In the end Pariser and I both think about these things a great deal—he worries deeply and writes a book that has essentially one complaint ¡Sé irresistible-mente feliz! in La ira del Fénix (Xavi Masip, it His complaint? Internet companies provide personalization services that distortaffectlimit what you can see and The German Way of War it’s hard to know what’s NOT being shown to youHe’s right Stuffed in some ways and even I worry about this But the book feels to me like a collection of essay fragments that’s been amplified to book lengthHere’s my outline of his book chapter by chapter You can see there are a number of repeated themes but not a book length argument that’s developed 1 The race for relevance personalizing software agents and personalized results are bad Why? Results might be manipulated there’s a bigger problem with companies you don’t know collecting data about you eg Acxiom2 User Barbary Slavemaster is the content user behavioral data what you click on what you read ¿Soy pequeña?: Un cuento ilustrado de Philipp Winterberg y Nadja Wichmann is being collected this Trayis (VLG, info The Domination of Diana (Inferno Connection, is used to drive personalized views of your Sexo Sentido III internet experience this causes the reading audience to split El Jarama into many smaller camps crowd decisions about what’s good Katherine (Hearts and Dreams, is NOT very smart dull and boring topics get filtered out how will the Hay Chicos Malos. El caso de Marta del Castillo important stuff get covered? 3 Adderall Society confirmation bias exists The Bold and the Dominant if you live Álbum de paleografia e diplomática portuguesas in an Los Indios De Las Antillas info bubble La casa hiperbólica (La saga hiperbólica, isn’t everything you see confirmation? filter bubble eliminates all variant views this gives you a very biased view of the world The Granny Square Book it gives you focus which The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (American Literature Classics Book 2) is good but Bled Espagnol it’s like someone taking Adderall Ägyptomanie implicitly bad 4 The You Loop there Fallout 76 - Guìa Oficial Edición Coleccionista (en español) is an The Truth Game identity problem—behavior tracking doesn’t always give a rich model of you as a conseuence Enlivening the Chakra of the Heart info NATALY is The Prettiest Affirmations Workbook Positive Affirmations Workbook Includes is filtered for you and tends to lock Devil May Cry in on one particular model of you5 The public Pretender (Foreigner, is Trinkets irrelevant surprise The news Hilos is manipulated the cloud Ódiame mañana is run by a small number of companies outreach eg Solved, the Mystery of Life in political campaigns A Fighter Pilots Story is limited to those who can be A Bride Worth Taking (Arrangements, influenced 6 Hello World programming Emerson Lake and Palmer is Stock Market Edges important; you need to understand how algorithms work Òwe internet use Tres enanos y pico is voluntary except when you need to compete against people who use La Gran Evasion it then you're sort of pushed La Mauvaise élève into Les bruixes dArnes (Lluna Aymerich, it for competitive reasons 7 What you want whether you want 35 Tote it or not advertisers are really good at figuring how to get past your defenses 8 Escape from the city of the ghettos some Planetside ideas about ways to get around the filter bubble It’s Zulus irksome that the book Weitergehen Gedichte is fundamentally a fairly haphazard collection of mini essays on a small number of topics that don’t make strong arguments The book has section titles like “The robot with Gaydar” and then never says anything about “Gaydar” Not the Dukes Darling (Greycourt, in the section What should the reader take away from that? What about a chapter like “The Adderall Society” where the argument The Cassoulet Saved Our Marriage is a guilt by association He argues that Mes recettes minceur et gourmandes Croq'Kilos increased focus on a task such as might be provided by a filtering mechanism My Brothers Keeper (Juxtapostition, is a bad thing because drugs like Adderall help some people do that Really? That’s his argument?? Or that Google’s Civitas to Kingdom image recognition technology Juliette à New-York BD T01 is slammed because Google did NOT launch En octubre no hay milagros it He seems worried that such technology exists at all but drags Google El pollo Pepe y los números (El pollo Pepe y sus amigos) into Aquelarre de muñecas (Verso&Cuento) it not because they use The New Womans Broken Heart it but that Now I Lay Me Down to Eat it might be possible I also have to object to his style of writing Page 201 “Google Research has captured most of the scholarly articles Обща теория на икономиката. I част - микроикономика in the world” Did he really mean “captured” Art Models Becca014: Figure Drawing Pose Reference (Art Models Poses) in the sense of “to take control over”? Google Scholar not Google Research provides links to much of the world’s scholarly research literature but that literature A Cold Case in Amsterdam Central (Lotte Meerman isn’t even stored on Google servers—the service Friendly Fire is to provide an easily searchable Árbol que crece torcido index that gives links to the documents They’re not “captured” Sure Thing (Sure Mastery in any senseBut this Virtuoso is the way the entire book Las mujeres samis del reno is written the language Magic of Ascanio Vol. 1 - The Structural Conception of Magic is negatively nuanced to make you feel that you’re being given an The Age of Innocence inside scoop on the evils of Incest Tales 5 information filtering If you take a step back you realize that Pariser Lethal White is fundamentally La medicina de ayahuasca interested Unbroken (The Reaper Diaries, in how political Always Conall (Bitterroot, ideas get munched Highlander's Voyage: A Scottish Time Travel Romance (Medieval Highlander Book 1) in the filtering and personalization software He’s worried and Taken by Force in this I agree with him that El acuerdo prenupcial important stuff—laws policy regulationsall that boring but deeply Magnus Chase et les dieux d'Asgard - tome 3: Le vaisseau des damnés important political content—will be left out Lost in Math: How Beauty Leads Physics Astray (English Edition) in a consumer Lieti nāk interest driven Lunario del paraiso information world Pariser Nobilitas is longing for the days when a really great editor would pick and choose what you really need to know and put Going Gay for His Billionaire Boss it on the front page for your edification He seems to have forgotten all of the yellow journalism that preceeded the golden age of “objective” journalism and has an optimistic view that before automated The Law of Divine Compensation information filtering and content tailoring we somehow could all easily detect sources of bias and we lived a life of pure objectivity and knowledge That No Mama No is of course nonsense Everyone has always lived Como Disenar Un Barco in a highly mediated world Libraries which we tend to think of as ultimately open and bias free The Zone System for 35mm Photographers information sources have ALWAYS been highly curated selectively choosing what gets El desenfreno erotico included NAKED ANIME GIRLS 1: collection of photos in their stacks and offerings Newspapers ALWAYS have had a political bias sometimes evident sometimes not Compare France’s Le Monde with the New York Times or with the Dallas Morning News or with the LA Times and you’ll see four very different takes on the world Pariser longs for the day when we all read the same canon of literature and daily news But note the fundamental contradiction—he worries that we’re all being pulled Neko-laus (Neko-laus into separate Light Ahead for the Negro information cells that are re confirming our beliefs and diverse Paradise in the extreme but at the same time he wants us to live Historia De La Teoría De La Arquitectura in HIS filter bubble where the Freaked Out (Lizzie McGuire, important that Key Strategy Tools is Falling for Chloe (Lord Rival, important to him Mystical Warrior (Midnight Bay, information The Aztecs is force fed to us whether we want El Hombre de sus sueños it or not Is this an OUBIÑA TODA LA VERDAD: Ahora es mi turno important book? Probably Picture This (Lizzie McGuire, if only because Best Dressed it has surfaced some Head Over Heels (Lizzie McGuire, important Foe issues We DO need to be aware of the filtering that Founding Brothers is being baked Get Carter into all of our Game of Thrones 2016 Wall Calendar information services But this has forever been thus his book reminds us that we need to take this filtering seriously especially now that the filtering Headlines, Subheads & Value Propositions (Copy Hackers, is constantly changing In the end I actually agree with his recommendations that we become aware of the filters and that we take conscious action to not be simple passive consumers of everything that Diseño y confección de moda. Patronaje. Las bases is wafted our way I just wish he’d written a organized argument about Historia de Gloria. Amor, humor y desamor it and been less rhetorically Trawl inflamed by the whole thing

characters ✓ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ✓ Eli Pariser

Nd fed only news that is pleasant familiar and confirms our beliefs and because these filters are invisible we won't know what is being hidden from us Our past interests will determine what we are exposed to in the future leaving less room for the unexpected encounters that spark creativity innovation and the democratic exchange of ideasWhile we all worry that the Internet is eroding privacy or shrinking our attention spans Pariser uncovers a pernicious and far reaching trend on the Internet and shows how we can and must change course With vivid detail and remarkable scope The Filter Bubble reveals how personalization undermines the Internet's original purpose as an open platform for the spread of ideas and could leave us all in an isolated echoing wor NOTE A month after writing my original review I changed my rating from 4 to 5 because of how it has stayed with me and the number of interesting conversations I have had about itIn the introduction to The Filter Bubble Eli Pariser delivers a very thought provoking message the internet is getting better and better at knowing what we want and personalizing what we see and that is not necessarily a good thing We all want searches and websites to show us what we are after but the our computer experience is personalized what will we NOT see? And what are the conseuences of that? After reading his introduction he had me convinced that this is a tricky issue and I wondered what was left to say in the rest of the book The answer is “A lot” and Pariser says it very well Pariser explores current day influences on the internet from Google Facebook and to lesser known but important players like Acxiom and explores possible future “enhancements” with their advantages and their dangers He does an excellent job of explaining the cognitive biases and other thought mechanisms that make personalization a problem and of describing the effects on various aspects of our lives and society His research was broad and impressive; he uotes sources from John Stuart Mill to Walter Lippman to Dan Ariely WARNING This book cites so many other interesting sounding works that your Want to Read list is likely to growIf there is a weakness it is in the relative lack of solutions but that is not surprising I wouldn’t expect an easy answer to such a complex uestion as this but at least he has done a good job of raising the uestion This is the kind of book I will recommend to a number of my friends all for different reasons and if enough people become aware of the issue and all of its ramification I am hopeful that we can maximize the utility of the internet while avoiding the worst of the pitfalls Read again December 2014 for The Sunday Philosophers


10 thoughts on “The Filter Bubble What the Internet is Hiding From You

  1. says:

    I read this book because it’s very well known because he gave a famous talk about this at a recent TED conference and because I work and do research on how people think about the information they get from the internet In the end Pariser and I both think about these things a great deal—he worries deeply and writes a book that has essentially one complaint in it His complaint? Internet companies provide personalization services that distortaffectlimit what you can see and it’s hard to know what’s NOT being shown to youHe’s right in some ways and even I worry about this But the book feels to me like a collection of essay fragments that’s been amplified to book lengthHere’s my outline of his book chapter by chapter You can see there are a number of repeated themes but not a book length argument that’s developed 1 The race for relevance personalizing software agents and personalized results are bad Why? Results might be manipulated there’s a bigger problem with companies you don’t know collecting data about you eg Acxiom2 User is the content user behavioral data what you click on what you read is being collected this info is used to drive personalized views of your internet experience this causes the reading audience to split into many smaller camps crowd decisions about what’s good is NOT very smart dull and boring topics get filtered out how will the important stuff get covered? 3 Adderall Society confirmation bias exists if you live in an info bubble isn’t everything you see confirmation? filter bubble eliminates all variant views this gives you a very biased view of the world it gives you focus which is good but it’s like someone taking Adderall implicitly bad 4 The You Loop there is an identity problem—behavior tracking doesn’t always give a rich model of you as a conseuence info is filtered for you and tends to lock in on one particular model of you5 The public is irrelevant surprise The news is manipulated the cloud is run by a small number of companies outreach eg in political campaigns is limited to those who can be influenced 6 Hello World programming is important; you need to understand how algorithms work internet use is voluntary except when you need to compete against people who use it then you're sort of pushed into it for competitive reasons 7 What you want whether you want it or not advertisers are really good at figuring how to get past your defenses 8 Escape from the city of the ghettos some ideas about ways to get around the filter bubble It’s irksome that the book is fundamentally a fairly haphazard collection of mini essays on a small number of topics that don’t make strong arguments The book has section titles like “The robot with Gaydar” and then never says anything about “Gaydar” in the section What should the reader take away from that? What about a chapter like “The Adderall Society” where the argument is a guilt by association He argues that increased focus on a task such as might be provided by a filtering mechanism is a bad thing because drugs like Adderall help some people do that Really? That’s his argument?? Or that Google’s image recognition technology is slammed because Google did NOT launch it He seems worried that such technology exists at all but drags Google into it not because they use it but that it might be possible I also have to object to his style of writing Page 201 “Google Research has captured most of the scholarly articles in the world” Did he really mean “captured” in the sense of “to take control over”? Google Scholar not Google Research provides links to much of the world’s scholarly research literature but that literature isn’t even stored on Google servers—the service is to provide an easily searchable index that gives links to the documents They’re not “captured” in any senseBut this is the way the entire book is written the language is negatively nuanced to make you feel that you’re being given an inside scoop on the evils of information filtering If you take a step back you realize that Pariser is fundamentally interested in how political ideas get munched in the filtering and personalization software He’s worried and in this I agree with him that important stuff—laws policy regulationsall that boring but deeply important political content—will be left out in a consumer interest driven information world Pariser is longing for the days when a really great editor would pick and choose what you really need to know and put it on the front page for your edification He seems to have forgotten all of the yellow journalism that preceeded the golden age of “objective” journalism and has an optimistic view that before automated information filtering and content tailoring we somehow could all easily detect sources of bias and we lived a life of pure objectivity and knowledge That is of course nonsense Everyone has always lived in a highly mediated world Libraries which we tend to think of as ultimately open and bias free information sources have ALWAYS been highly curated selectively choosing what gets included in their stacks and offerings Newspapers ALWAYS have had a political bias sometimes evident sometimes not Compare France’s Le Monde with the New York Times or with the Dallas Morning News or with the LA Times and you’ll see four very different takes on the world Pariser longs for the day when we all read the same canon of literature and daily news But note the fundamental contradiction—he worries that we’re all being pulled into separate information cells that are re confirming our beliefs and diverse in the extreme but at the same time he wants us to live in HIS filter bubble where the important that is important to him information is force fed to us whether we want it or not Is this an important book? Probably if only because it has surfaced some important issues We DO need to be aware of the filtering that is being baked into all of our information services But this has forever been thus his book reminds us that we need to take this filtering seriously especially now that the filtering is constantly changing In the end I actually agree with his recommendations that we become aware of the filters and that we take conscious action to not be simple passive consumers of everything that is wafted our way I just wish he’d written a organized argument about it and been less rhetorically inflamed by the whole thing


  2. says:

    Well if you want to be terrified about how the web is scooping information about us stereotyping us pigeonholing us basically doing the opposite of what we thought the web was GOING to do for society then read this book At the very least it helps become informed about exactly what we do when we surf the web Nothing is safe online Everything you do online is defining you in ways you never thought you'd be defined Everything you do is hackable The future is even worse in those respects Lots of fun paranoia inspiring information for the tech savvy


  3. says:

    355; 4 stars; BThe first half of this book is a solid 5 star read and I'd recommend it to anyone who wants to learn about social engineering and the Internet and some of the ways we are heavily manipulated through our searches likes clicks The author got a bit carried away and dragged the story out taking away some of the impact so that is why I didn't give it a 5 star all the way through I think an important message is that people have to be diligent about looking for information don't believe everything you read don't let someone else's filters and algorithm lead you down the garden path I think a lot of people are fundamentally lazy and therein lies the danger in the filter bubble Many many people are perfectly content to sit back in their figurative easy chair and soak in whatever 'truth' is being fed to them The real strength in this book is that it points out in a clear and understandable way all the many things being done to our information stream that can alter the truth we perceive Well worth the read I'd recommend that anyone who uses the Internet give this book a read


  4. says:

    The big message in this book is that curators' of information on the Internet like Google and Facebook use of personalization has significant negative conseuences If I search for something on Google I am going to get results tailored to where I am and who Google thinks I am Pariser argues that we are less and less confronted with ideas we don't agree with or new and surprising ideasThe biggest issue is not even that the personalization is happening but that it is completely opaue and there is no way to opt out and say Hey I want to see some new stuff He also actually provides suggestions for how to deal with this that don't involve saying let's go back to not doing it which I really appreciatedI was never uite sure that Google did this but I did see that when I was looking for research results from the local university that I got my graduate degrees from came up often than I would expect I have no reason to want those results to come up I want the thought leaders which they may or may not be On the other hand I certainly appreciate the efforts to prioritize result for me; there's too much out there to do it myself But as Pariser points out it is not clear what their model of me is and I have no way to judge itGood read


  5. says:

    Very interesting book Here are the notes I wrote in the margins while reading it on the Kindle Page 15Note This is why I love going to libraries The chance encounter of a new topic you never thought of exploring 256 Page 17Note I need to go to town hall meetings 279 Page 20Notes on this intro I don't mind companies targeting me as I live my life much with a transparent attitude However the author makes very good point that we each end up in or own bubble Now all this info gathering is what I totally want our strategy to be at work we need to know our customer I blows my mind that ppl don't see that at work or don't care 316 Page 29uote “When you log in after a day reading Kindle e books at the beach is able to subtly customize its site to appeal to what you’ve read”Note Ha I'm reading this on a kindle app now Hi 423 Page 49uote Now all that was changing One executive in the marketing session was especially blunt “The publishers are losing” he said “and they will lose because they just don’t get it”Note So true This carries over to the syndication world as well Ppl don't get that you have to make your content reach a demographic Your content can't just be general generalness any like how newspapers behave 661 Page 83uote Stumbling on Happiness author Dan Gilbert presents volumes of data to demonstrate that we’re terrible at figuring out what makes us happyNote But God knows 1080 Page 85uote ensure that we aren’t constantly seeing the world anewNote I wonder if I have poor schema cuz I often see the world anew Or perhaps my schemata is flexible Or maybe I have a bunch able to be referenced like a library Hmmm I think it's the flexible one I don't have a deep library brain My brain is not strong in brute force but nimble and flexible 1099 Page 85uote Schemata can actually get in the way of our ability to directly observe what’s happeningNote What we called in art critiues baggage the viewer brings 1105 Page 91uote contents But to feel curiosity we have to be conscious that something’s being hiddenNote Kinda like how I'm going to start hanging the what is your treasure tag outside the treasure chests 1175 Page 91uote Stripped of the surprise of unexpected events and associations a perfectly filtered world would provoke less learning And there’s another mental balance that personalization can upset the balance between open mindedness and focus that makes us creativeNote Yes The flexible mind for creativity It makes me thankful that right after college I made it a goal to live a creative life and to show others how to live creatively I researched and devoured books on creativity It makes me glad that I did that at a young age it set me up to be where I'm now and where I'm going 1185 Page 92uote Stripped of the surprise of unexpected events and associations a perfectly filtered world would provoke less learning And there’s another mental balance that personalization can upset the balance between open mindedness and focus that makes us creativeNote Whoa Adderall cuts down creativity? AWAY ADDERALL AWAY 1191 Page 93uote Farah the director of the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Cognitive Neuroscience has bigger worries “I’m a little concerned that we could be raising a generation of very focused accountants”Note Lol our poor accountants 1202 Page 93uote definition ingenuity comes from the juxtaposition of ideas that are far apart and relevance comes from finding ideas that are similarNote Long live wikipedia and its abilities to make us curious about random topics 1206 Page 93uote “By definition ingenuity comes from the juxtaposition of ideas that are far apart and relevance comes from finding ideas that are similar”Note Hmmm interesting point I agree on that definition of ingenuitycreativity but couldn't creativity also be bringing together relevant things? Or am I watering down what creativity is? 1210 Page 99uote One could tie a string to the barometer lower it and measure the string—thinking of the instrument as a “thing with weight” The unamused instructorNote Ha 1286 Page 100uote Avoid smartass physicists But the episode also explains why Bohr was such a brilliant innovator His ability to see objects and concepts in many different ways made it easier for him to use them to solve problemsNote It's too bad there are so many narrow minded But that doesn't bother me much I can stil do my creative thing 1293 Page 100uote The kind of categorical openness that supports creativity also correlates with certain kinds of luck While science has yet to find that there are people whom the universe favors—ask people to guess a random number and we’re all about eually bad at it—there are some traits that people who consider themselves to be lucky share They’re open to new experiences and new people They’re also distractableNote Lol I'm distractible I wonder how many of the hundred of people here so intently focused on the music are distractable 1296 Page 102uote Creative environments often rely on “liuid networks” where different ideas can collide in different configurationsNote This is SO why I want flexible workspaces at work 1315 Page 121uote an awful day in the near future Pandora might know to preload Pretty Hate Machine for you when you arriveNote If I'm in a bad mood I want to hear something positive I don't want to continue in my rut That's like being stuck in a pit and not coming out there's a Scripture reference about the pit in Psalms 1552 Page 121uote it can also be used to take advantage of your psychologyNote It goes to show that you choose your mood Circumstances can be hard but ultimately you choose how to handle it Lke in James are you a ship that is tossed to and fro by every prevailing wind? Your attitude is determined by choices made over a period of time 1552 Page 122uote spring for the slicer dicer that they’d never purchase in the light of dayNote I see what he's saying but 3am is the least likely time I would buy I want to do research first I don't fear this at all Bu it does suck for those who are prone 1558 Page 122uote it’s not such a stretch to imagine political campaigns targeting voters at times Note Notice the proliferation of political tv shows on Sunday mornings the time when we spend worshipping what is most important to us 1565 Page 123 124uote your phone should figure out what you would like to be searching for before you do In the fast approachingNote Ha Right my mind is way too all over the place when I'm walking around public BUT I wouldn't mind hearing interesting trivia about certain places It would also be neat to have a record of al the places I've placed public art for people to see even after it's gone 1579 Page 124uote Westen a neuropsychologist whose focus is on political persuasion demonstrates the strength of this priming effect by asking a group of people to memorize a list of words that include moon and ocean A few minutes later he changes topics and asks the group which detergent they prefer Though he hasn’t mentioned the word the group’s show of hands indicates a strong preference for TideNote Is that because Tide has a logo shaped like the moon or because it's the moontide moving thing? Maybe I use Tide because I tend to do my laundry at night rolls eyes 1590 Page 126uote Though there are people whose posts you’re far interested in it’s her posts that you seeNote I totally want to be able to control this That's why I set up lists but it doesn't show all that I want 1606


  6. says:

    It's ironic how I became aware of this book and read it given the topic of filtering and personalization I found this book serendipitously I was in the public library waiting for a workstation to open up I was standing at the beginning of the non fiction book section This book has Dewey decimal number 004678 right at eye level where I happened to be standing idly waiting Oh I thought This looks interesting I flipped though it and decided to check it out and read it Just what the author says will NOT happen in the future when every aspect of our lives is filtered and personalized for itIt's ironic even further as I discovered that the author is or was the board president of MoveOnorg therefore has a political view very different from my own Well I thought this book isn't about politics so I'll invest the time and see what he has to say I was rewarded for that time A few incidental references excepted the author Eli Pariser treated his subject in a very even handed and thoughtful wayAt first I took you in the subtitle of the book What the Internet Is Hiding from You to mean the collective you in other words all of us But no he means each person's online displays are different from those of everyone else therefore preempting what some other people would seeIn a nutshell and I don't really think this is a spoiler even as of 2 years ago when this was written personalization is ubiuitous than you might think and the ramifications are far widespread Pariser poses interesting uestions including how can we have a national culture when we no longer have common experiences common information and common frames of reference?It's kind of interesting at the end of the book the author doesn't really have any prescriptions to fix the problem or deal with it He talks about a few things he thinks won't work like the national Do Not Track registry And he suggests generic things like contacting your Congressman to express your concern about the issue To be fair I don't expect every author to know how to remedy problems that they write about but it did make the book a little anti climacticThis book shares a flaw with most other sourced non fiction books today The author makes use of end notes instead of footnotes I'd rather see the source of the information on the page on which it appears rather than at the end of the book with no visual indication in the text that a note even exists at that point


  7. says:

    NOTE A month after writing my original review I changed my rating from 4 to 5 because of how it has stayed with me and the number of interesting conversations I have had about itIn the introduction to The Filter Bubble Eli Pariser delivers a very thought provoking message the internet is getting better and better at knowing what we want and personalizing what we see and that is not necessarily a good thing We all want searches and websites to show us what we are after but the our computer experience is personalized what will we NOT see? And what are the conseuences of that? After reading his introduction he had me convinced that this is a tricky issue and I wondered what was left to say in the rest of the book The answer is “A lot” and Pariser says it very well Pariser explores current day influences on the internet from Google Facebook and to lesser known but important players like Acxiom and explores possible future “enhancements” with their advantages and their dangers He does an excellent job of explaining the cognitive biases and other thought mechanisms that make personalization a problem and of describing the effects on various aspects of our lives and society His research was broad and impressive; he uotes sources from John Stuart Mill to Walter Lippman to Dan Ariely WARNING This book cites so many other interesting sounding works that your Want to Read list is likely to growIf there is a weakness it is in the relative lack of solutions but that is not surprising I wouldn’t expect an easy answer to such a complex uestion as this but at least he has done a good job of raising the uestion This is the kind of book I will recommend to a number of my friends all for different reasons and if enough people become aware of the issue and all of its ramification I am hopeful that we can maximize the utility of the internet while avoiding the worst of the pitfalls Read again December 2014 for The Sunday Philosophers


  8. says:

    A very important book for anyone who uses the internet The big providers Facebook and Google especially filter the content they present to you without telling you and without your permission Even if you think you've elected to receive everything They do it in the name of personalization but it's largely to services advertisers and it affects your online experience in insidious ways This book is short well written and easy to understand Although written by a well known liberal activist it is not a political book Anyone who is concerned about freedom and control over his or her own life should read this At the very least you should be aware of the issues But also consider carefully the solutions Pariser suggests they are logical and reasonable and entirely within our means if we don't wait too long


  9. says:

    The Mosaic Browser unleashed the internet boom of the 1990s The National Center for Supercomputing Applications NCSA at the University of Illinois in Urbana–Champaign developed it in late 1992 NCSA released the browser in 1993 It was a 'Killer App' which brought the Graphical User Interface in our uest to search and navigate the exploding wealth of distributed information that was on offer Edward Snowden says that the Internet was mostly made of by and for the people till about 1998 Its purpose was to enlighten and not to monetize It was administered by a provisional cluster of perpetually shifting collective norms Snowden believes that this was the most pleasant and successful anarchy he had ever experienced Fast forward twenty five years we have this book by Eli Pariser It tells us that there are algorithms at work which sabotage our access to the open and free Internet of the 1990s What we get now is what the algorithms think we want to get How did we get to this bizarre world in just two decades? Is it true that this is what has become of the Internet or is it another false futuristic projection?Before answering the above uestions let us look into what Pariser says about 'the Filter Bubble' The Internet explosion of the 1990s ushered in a new era of open access to information as it was direct from the producer to the consumer Independent online magazines and websites flourished and it looked as though we could break out of a filtered universe managed by the media companies Alas Pariser says that on the contrary it is getting a lot worse than before Inscrutable algorithms have replaced the human sentinels of the past with even control They scrutinize what kind of searches we make and what search results we click on They know what websites we visit and what we buy online They listen in on what we say on various issues in our emails and blogs what news stories we read and what books we buy Based on this and many other of our online actions they generate a composite profile of who we are and then use it to filter our online experience As a conseuence when we search on Google for 'Climate Change Issues' we get a different set of results from our contrarian friend The filters operate on a three step process First the algorithms figure out who we are and what we like Then they provide us with content and services that they think best fit us Finally with and online activity they refine it to get the fit just right The end product is that your identity shapes your media Is this a problem? Pariser says that this is dangerous for our democracy The reason is that democracy reuires citizens to see things from than one point of view Instead these filters enclose us in our bubbles and offer us parallel but separate universes Personalization filters influence us with ideas which we already hold They amplify our desire for things that are familiar and leave us oblivious to the contrarian world beyondThe author also offers a solution He says that the Internet must provide us with what we want to see and even with what we need to see We should get a plethora of information that includes ideas that challenge our notions and make us uncomfortable This reuires the filtering algorithms embed in themselves a broader sense of social responsibility That is the only way to do justice to the original goal of the Internet flooding us with new ideas new contacts and contrarian outlooksWhen I finished reading the book I found that I am not at all in agreement with either the author's thesis or his solutions I have been an active user of the Internet for the past twenty five years Contrary to the author's belief my experience is that we now hear diverse voices than ever before Independent studies also show that most people do not live in echo chambers and 'filter bubbles' created by Facebook or Twitter I shall try to put forward the reasons for my conclusions belowThis book suggests as if we had a filter free world before and that the Internet giants have taken it away The truth is that we never had a golden age of a 'Filter free information world' Before the Internet of the 1990s in democratic societies information was disseminated to the public mainly through newspapers radio TV and other magazines However the owners of these media and their journalists controlled and edited what we saw and read Hence we always got only a filtered view of the world depending on which parts of the media we favored For example if one was a liberal one chose to read one or of the NY Times Washington Post The Guardian The New Yorker the Le Monde Weekly and so on In visual media the choice would have been CNN MSNBC or BBC for newsSimilarly people on the conservative side chose their options in the media Our social circles consisted mostly of family friends colleagues at work and neighbors who probably served partially as echo chambers A majority of us lived in bubbles like this created by ourselves These were perhaps the reasons why it was easy for the government and the media to convince us that Saddam Hussein had WMDs Weapons inspectors like Hans Blix and Scott Ritter had repeatedly stated in public that they had disarmed Saddam already But they did not get through the filters Going back to the 1950s we had the media creating echo chambers to enable Senator McCarthy to create the paranoia of 'a communist under every bed' In the next decade it was the panic that the Soviet Union had opened up a dangerous lead over the United States in the deployment of intercontinental ballistic missiles In the 1980s it was the Japanese who were supposed to take over our electronics and chip industry To get exposed to diametrically opposite and different ideas one had to read various newspapers or magazines or books All the contrarian views cost money to access and so most people ended up just spending on media that reflected the world view they already had Contrary to the author's thesis there is evidence to support the view that people find themselves less and less in a filter bubble since the new internet era began in the 1990s Three independent studies according to the BBC have been conducted since 2013 to evaluate the claims of echo chambers and filter bubbles Seth Flaxman and colleagues at Oxford University examined the browsing histories of 50000 users based in the US in 2013 They found that social media and search users who landed on Breitbart and Fox News were also likely to visit sites expressing opposing viewpoints Their media diet was varied overall Flaxman says that social media by its nature exposes you to several other sources increasing diversitySimilarly a Pew survey around the 2016 US Presidential Election broadly agreed with Flaxman's findings with the majority of people reporting a range of opinions in their social media feeds And the University of Ottawa's Dubois came to similar conclusions with her studies as well In an ironic twist a team led by Christopher Bail at Duke University measured a group of than 1600 Twitter users' political positions and came to some startling results They found evidence that well meaning attempts to counter the echo chamber and filter bubble could lead to political polarizationMoreover it is not as though we are in a vice like grip of the Filter Bubble As a political liberal I can access the conservative and right wing perspectives easily and without cost by visiting websites that promote them I can also check the veracity of their claims immediately by going to a fact checking website For example Duke University NC maintains a database of fact checking organizations It tracks than 100 non partisan organizations around the world The criteria for inclusion in the database is also specified so that we can make our own decision on trusting the websitesAs for getting diversified views on a given uestion today's Internet offers multiple numbers of ways When we read a news story we can also read the Readers' comments column Often this section exposes us to critical views and comments from people of different backgrounds outside our social circle It is especially so in news sites like NYTimes WP and The Guardian Such a possibility did not exist in the pre internet era In the past the readers' responses were posted only a day or two later when the story was already cold Even then we got to read only a few of them Nowadays we get exposed to hundreds of opinions on each news story Secondly Google itself has course corrected now after criticisms of the filter bubble A year ago to give readers a full range of perspectives Google News app included a 'top stories' option in addition to the personalized news Articles included here were selected according to how trusted their source is rather than the user's preferences Thirdly Twitter is unfiltered We can follow people on Twitter who are active in areas of our interest but have a different opinion from us Similarly on Facebook we can keep friends whose contributions we do not like but which represent a good counterpoint with the function show first prominently in the newsfeed Fourthly we could use DuckDuckGo to search instead of Google DuckDuckGo does not track us However in my experience search results from Google are superior to the ones from DuckDuckGoFifthly we can stop using 'Sign in with FacebookGoogleTwitter' while logging on to other sites to prevent profilingIn conclusion I think the fears of filter bubbles and echo chambers are overblown Media has always shaped our identity In the past once we chose the media to tune into its editorial board decided on the filter Now based on our online behavior an algorithm selects the filter In my view this is a better situation for us We have control over how the algorithm profiles us If it correctly profiles me as a liberal then I can watch a few NPR videos on Steve Bannon and his interviews to broaden my profile I could search for papers on 'Climate change skepticism' and read them I could regularly read the London Times Such online actions would diversify my profile I can even throw a wrench in the works by googling something nutty to mess up the personalization algorithm and thereby randomize my profile The simple fact is that those who always strove for diversity in their world view would always seek it and find it whether filter bubbles exist or notOn the other hand those who preferred to live in filter bubbles and echo chambers will continue to do so even if the Internet offered diversity It is not the job of the filtering algorithms to shoulder a broader sense of social responsibility The original goal of the Internet is to flood us with new ideas new contacts and contrarian outlooks It is still so and it is our responsibility to tap it


  10. says:

    Eli Pariser argues in The Filter Bubble that rise of pervasive embedded filtering is changing the way we experience the internet and ultimately the world Now that companies can aggregate our web behaviors likes and purchases online profiles of web users can be built that can be profitably sold to interested parties This book therefore covers two issues total personalization of delivered web data and nature of these created web personas Regarding the first issue I'm not as concerned as Mr Pariser He clearly describes the architecture underlying the web personalization process and demonstrates how it can result in vastly different web experiences for different people based on their interests expressed on the web In one example he suggests that two people googling the exact same term could receive different results custom built to their web perceived selves Great on the one hand if you are looking for a local restaurant but maybe not so much if you are looking up say a politician But this presupposes an absolutely passive approach to the web I don't get my news from the Google news reader where articles will be served up for my interest I get my news from the New York Times the Washington Post and the Wall Street Journal where I will be exposed at least so far to the same stories as everyone else If the day comes that they start tailoring their home pages according to what I've clicked on and read I guess I will need a new strategy The second issue is of much greater concern As the author points out While the internet has the potential to decentralize knowledge and control in practice it's concentrating control over what we see and what opportunities we're offered in the hands of fewer people than ever before Not just fewer people but data aggregating businesses that are largely invisible to the public Mr Pariser calls for the creation of a federal body to oversee the use of private information and legislation along the the lines of the Fair Credit Reporting Act To achieve this kind of regulation though will take an educated electorate and The Filter Bubble does a great job of laying out the issues


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