On The Natural Faculties Download Ô eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB



10 thoughts on “On The Natural Faculties

  1. says:

    The fact is that those who are enslaved to their sects are not merely devoid of all sound knowledge but they will not even stop to learn This little book was appended to my Great Books of the Western World copy of the Hippocratic writings so I decided to go ahead and read it I’m not sure I’m happy with that decision Having by now read my fair share of ancient science I must confess that the experience is often stultifyingly d

  2. says:

    As I proceeded through the pages about urine bile and digestion I had difficulty understanding why Galen was included in Britannica’s Great Books list Then I came to this passage near the end While however the statements which th

  3. says:

    Galen's 200 AD view of medicine was based on that of his hero Hippocrates and was the standard view of medicine until the 1530s when Vesalius conducted his researches Galen's emphasis on the importance of blood letting in

  4. says:

    Apart from whatever merit Galen's work has this is a terrible edition Amateurish cheap antiuated and typo ridden

  5. says:

    Light but not entertaining reading and hard to see how it would be practically useful Galen presents his view of what the organs do sometimes he is right sometimes he is wrong The ideas in this book seem useless to an ancient doctor It does

  6. says:

    A biological treatise mixed with some philosophical mattersIt's an advancement over previous works like Hippocrates even though he is well mentioned for considering nature a beauty and having certain facultiesTreats food specially honey relationship with health citing Erasistratus Hippocrates and othersHis talks on human parts like uterus and stomach is way technical than previous philosophersThis isn't a kind of book I like just the same

  7. says:

    Help me out MDs Am I right in seeing Galen as a progression and perhaps even a corrective to Hippocrates Eristitatus and others Since my background in life science is very limited I hesitate to be either critical

  8. says:

    Galen is debatably less wrong than the earlier Greek physicians whom he so viciously decries but his crude anatomical theories have little bearing on modern medicine This edition is poorly edited and poorly laid out The Loeb Classics edition is much better but really why bother

  9. says:

    It's a most systematic and authori

  10. says:

    Watching an ancient mind think especially on a topic like science helps clear away modern snobbishness

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review ↠ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ✓ Galen

Le to compare my own version with Linacre’s Latin translation and the French rendering of Charles Darembergin this respect I am also peculiarly fortunate in having had the help of Mr A W Pickard Cambridge of Balliol College Oxford who most kindly went through the Pg vi proofs and made many valuable suggestions from the point of view of exact scholarship My best thanks are due to the Editors for their courtesy and for the kindly interest they have taken in the work I have also gratefully to acknowledge the receipt of much assistance and encouragement from Sir William Osler Regius Professor of Medicine at Oxford and from Dr J D Comrie first lecturer on the History of Medicine at Edinburgh University Professor D’Arcy W Thompson of U A biological treatise mixed with some philosophical mattersIt s an advancement over previous works like Hippocrates even though he is well mentioned for considering nature a beauty and having certain facultiesTreats food specially honey relationship with health citing Erasistratus Hippocrates and othersHis talks on human parts like uterus and stomach is way technical than previous philosophersThis isn t a kind of book I like just the same as Aristotle books on biology except the latter is a bit interesting due to curiosities noted by the author

Read On The Natural Faculties

On The Natural Faculties

Niversity College Dundee and Sir W T Thiselton Dyer late director of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew have very kindly helped me to identify several animals and plants mentioned by Galen I cannot conclude without expressing a word of gratitude to my former biological teachers Professors Patrick Geddes and J Arthur Thomson The experience reared on the foundation of their teaching has gone far to help me in interpreting the great medical biologist of Greece I should be glad to think that the present work might help however little to hasten the coming reunion between the “humanities” and modern biological science their present separation I believe to be against the best interest of both A J B nd Stationary Hospital Aldershot March Help me out MDs Am I right in seeing Galen as a progression and perhaps even a corrective to Hippocrates Eristitatus and others Since my background in life science is very limited I hesitate to be either critical or precise I know about physiology now than before I read this so you can t really lose by reading this can you I might suggest reading a little Hippocrates first as I did to provide a little context

review ↠ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ✓ Galen

The text used is with a few unimportant modifications that of Kühn Vol II as edited by Georg Helmreich Teubner Leipzig The numbers of the pages of Kühn’s edition are printed at the side of the Greek text a parallel mark || in the line indicating the exact point of division between Kühn’s pages Words in the English text which are enclosed in suare brackets are supplementary On The PDF or explanatory practically all explanations however are relegated to the footnotes or introduction In the footnotes also attention is drawn to words which are of particular philological interest from the point of view of modern medicine I have made the translation directly from the Greek where passages of special difficulty occurred I have been ab As I proceeded through the pages about urine bile and digestion I had difficulty understanding why Galen was included in Britannica s Great Books list Then I came to this passage near the end While however the statements which the Ancients made on these points were correct they yet omitted to defend their arguments with logical proofs of course they never suspected that there could be sophists so shameless as to try to contradict obvious facts More recent physicians again have been partly conuered by the sophistries of these fellows and have given credence to them whilst others who attempted to argue with them appear to me to lack to a great extent the power of the Ancients For this reason I have attempted to put together my arguments in the way in which it seems to me the Ancients had any of them been still alive would have done in opposition to those who would overturn the finest doctrines of our art I am not however unaware that I shall achieve either nothing at all or else very little For I find that a great many things which have been conclusively demonstrated by the Ancients are unintelligible to the bulk of the Moderns owing to their ignorance nay that by reason of their laziness they will not even make an attempt to comprehend them and even if any of them have understood them they have not given them impartial examination The fact is that he whose purpose is to know anything better than the multitude do must far surpass all others both as regards his nature and his early training And when he reaches early adolescence he must become possessed with an ardent love for truth like one inspired neither day nor night may he cease to urge and strain himself in order to learn thoroughly all that has been said by the most illustrious of the Ancients And when he has learnt this then for a prolonged period he must test and prove it observing what part of it is in agreement and what in disagreement with obvious fact thus he will choose this and turn away from that To such an one my hope has been that my treatise would prove of the very greatest assistance Still such people may be expected to be uite few in number while as for the others this book will be as superfluous to them as a tale told to an ass pgs75 76 After some outside research ie Wikipedia and Google it became apparent that Galen was the authority on medicine until the Renaissance His authoritative claims went unchallenged for over a millenniaGalen does not hide his contempt for his contemporaries who classify themselves as Erasistrateans or Asclepiadeans Galen considered himself beyond such labels and dedicated himself to critical analysis He suffers no fools as he haughtily dismisses the theories that fail to survive his experimentation and logical conclusions A true empiricist he devotes himself to uestioning all theories and constructing medical proofs while simultaneously reverently referring to his predecessors whom he deemed worthy especially Hippocrates and AristotleThough Galen s importance in medical history is probably not much debated the actual work itself yields little to anyone today except medical historians Galen was referring to his contemporaries in the above uote but sadly On the Natural Faculties is not a timeless work and to myself and most readers will truly be as superfluous as a tale told to an ass