Illusions perdues review É eBook or Kindle ePUB

summary Illusions perdues

Ous beau monde of Paris But Lucien has entered a world far dangerous than he realized as Madame de Bargeton's reputation becomes compromised and the fickle venomous denizens of the courts and salons conspire to keep him out of their ranks Lucien eventually Some thoughts on the bookThis is such a wow of a novel I gather that Balzac in writing the vast book series of which this is one wanted it to be a document as much as work of fiction And so it is There is a level of detail about subjects like accounting in early nineteenth century France and the legal system that is hard to believe one could get away with selling in a work of fiction Then there is the paper industry the Chinese were to blame then as now the difficulties of cheap labour competition the bookselling industry and its corrupt links to the reviewing industry And the reviewing industry's corrupt links to just about anybody Reviewers who often scraped together the funds for their precarious existence by selling their review copies and the tickets they received as bribes from theatre managementsThen there is his cynical eye unblinking in its observation of the appalling nature of Parisian society not to mention the hand me down version as practised by the best of provincial society There are 'good people' depicted here but they are all self deluding dills and one wants nothing than to bang their heads together or make them sit in the corner with their backs to class until they reform or write a hundred times on the blackboard 'I will get real' Being 'good' is no way to escape the scathing judgement of Monsieur BalzacThat said there is one strange small group of men who stay true to their dedication to real literature as opposed to the rascally reviewers with whom Lucien goes astray And I feel like Balzac sees himself there They have no weaknesses they never betray themselves or each other They worship no false gods not fashion not wealth not status None of the things that are like oxygen to LucienI think Balzac needs them to balance David and Lucien's sister David is perfectly able to see Lucien as he really is but he can't do the right thing with that information David's ruination is that he knows everybody else without knowing himself at all At least Lucien's sister steps up to face the facts way too late for it to help their dire situation but still David remains in fourth grade writing those lines and sitting in the corner while she's going to get out of primary school for sureif she doesn't die of starvation firstrest here I am happy to report that when I wrote on social media for my friends that I'd finished a Balzac that could be thus described as below Gareth immediately guessed 'Lost Illusions'? My comparison was presumably aptBlackadderdescribing a novel he's written 'Edmund A Butler's Tale A huge roller coaster of a novel in four hundred sizzling chapters A searing indictment of domestic servitude in the eighteenth century with some hot gypsies thrown in'Okay so Balzac's novel is early nineteenth century it's hot teenage actresses not gypsies and the indictment is of society as a whole nothing escapes Balzac's eye But in spirit Lost Illusions is Edmund to a tee Sizzling roller coaster ride that never stops indeedDetail to comePosted earlierThis is premature but what a wonderful passage I've just read about one sixth into the book It could have been written last night about today Our hero in the business is explaining to the woman to whom he is proposing how the paper industry for printing worksAnd for this reason although linen lasts so much longer than cotton that it is in reality cheaper in the end the poor would rather make the smaller outlay in the first instance and by virtue of the law of Vae victis pay enormously before they have done The middle classes do the same So there is a scarcity of linen In England where four fifths of the population use cotton to the exclusion of linen they make nothing but cotton paper The cotton paper is very soft and easily creased to begin with and it has a further defect it is so soluble that if you seep a book made of cotton paper in water for fifteen minutes it turns to a pulp while an old book left in water for a couple of hours is not spoilt You could dry the old book and the pages though yellow and faded would still be legible the work would not be destroyedThere is a time coming when legislation will eualize our fortunes and we shall all be poor together; we shall want our linen and our books to be cheap just as people are beginning to prefer small pictures because they have not wall space enough for large ones Well the shirts and the books will not last that is all; it is the same on all sides solidity is drying out So this problem is one of the first importance for literature science and politicsOne day in my office there was a hot discussion going on about the material that the Chinese use for making paper Their paper is far better than ours because the raw material is better; and a good deal was said about this thin light Chinese paper for if it is light and thin the texture is close there are no transparent spots in it In Paris there are learned men among the printers' readers; Fourier and Pierre Leroux are Lachevardiere's readers at this moment; and the Comte de Saint Simon who happened to be correcting proofs for us came in in the middle of the discussion He told us at once that according to Kempfer and du Halde the Broussonetia furnishes the substance of the Chinese paper; it is a vegetable substance like linen or cotton for that matter Another reader maintained that Chinese paper was principally made of an animal substance to wit the silk that is abundant there They made a bet about it in my presence The Messieurs Didot are printers to the Institute so naturally they referred the uestion to that learned body M Marcel who used to be superintendent of the Royal Printing Establishment was umpire and he sent the two readers to M l'Abbe Grozier Librarian at the Arsenal By the Abbe's decision they both lost their wages The paper was not made of silk nor yet from the Broussonetia; the pulp proved to be the triturated fibre of some kind of bamboo The Abbe Grozier had a Chinese book an iconographical and technological work with a great many pictures in it illustrating all the different processes of paper making and he showed us a picture of the workshop with the bamboo stalks lying in a heap in the corner; it was extremely well drawn Lucien told me that your father with the intuition of a man of talent had a glimmering of a notion of some way of replacing linen rags with an exceedingly common vegetable product not previously manufactured but taken direct from the soil as the Chinese use vegetable fibre at first hand I have classified the guesses made by those who came before me and have begun to study the uestion The bamboo is a kind of reed; naturally I began to think of the reeds that grow here in FranceLabor is very cheap in China where a workman earns three halfpence a day and this cheapness of labor enables the Chinese to manipulate each sheet of paper separately They take it out of the mould and press it between heated tablets of white porcelain that is the secret of the surface and consistence the lightness and satin smoothness of the best paper in the world Well here in Europe the work must be done by machinery; machinery must take the place of cheap Chinese labor If we could but succeed in making a cheap paper of as good a uality the weight and thickness of printed books would be reduced by than one half A set of Voltaire printed on our woven paper and bound weighs about two hundred and fifty pounds; it would only weigh fifty if we used Chinese paper That surely would be a triumph for the housing of many books has come to be a difficulty; everything has grown smaller of late; this is not an age of giants; men have shrunk everything about them shrinks and house room into the bargain Great mansions and great suites of rooms will be abolished sooner or later in Paris for no one will afford to live in the great houses built by our forefathers What a disgrace for our age if none of its books should last Dutch paper that is paper made from flax will be uite unobtainable in ten years' time Orchard Valley realized as Madame de Bargeton's P.S. Im Pregnant reputation becomes compromised and the fickle venomous denizens of the courts and salons conspire to keep him out of their Tales of a New York Waitress (Queen of Klutz Book 1) ranks Lucien eventually Some thoughts on the bookThis is such a wow of a novel I gather that Balzac in writing the vast book series of which this is one wanted it to be a document as much as work of fiction And so it is There is a level of detail about subjects like accounting in early nineteenth century France and the legal system that is hard to believe one could get away with selling in a work of fiction Then there is the paper industry the Chinese were to blame then as now the difficulties of cheap labour competition the bookselling industry and its corrupt links to the Maid of Dishonor (The Wedding Season, reviewing industry And the Tigress for Two (Alaskan Tigers, reviewing industry's corrupt links to just about anybody Reviewers who often scraped together the funds for their precarious existence by selling their Supermob review copies and the tickets they Dem Nordpol am nächsten received as bribes from theatre managementsThen there is his cynical eye unblinking in its observation of the appalling nature of Parisian society not to mention the hand me down version as practised by the best of provincial society There are 'good people' depicted here but they are all self deluding dills and one wants nothing than to bang their heads together or make them sit in the corner with their backs to class until they All the Wrong Places reform or write a hundred times on the blackboard 'I will get Deliverance Prayers: For Use by the Laity real' Being 'good' is no way to escape the scathing judgement of Monsieur BalzacThat said there is one strange small group of men who stay true to their dedication to Cult Science Fiction Films real literature as opposed to the Heart Beat rascally Crime and Punishment reviewers with whom Lucien goes astray And I feel like Balzac sees himself there They have no weaknesses they never betray themselves or each other They worship no false gods not fashion not wealth not status None of the things that are like oxygen to LucienI think Balzac needs them to balance David and Lucien's sister David is perfectly able to see Lucien as he The Site Book really is but he can't do the Sailor Moon Episode Lists right thing with that information David's Kill Me If You Can ruination is that he knows everybody else without knowing himself at all At least Lucien's sister steps up to face the facts way too late for it to help their dire situation but still David The Devils Possession remains in fourth grade writing those lines and sitting in the corner while she's going to get out of primary school for sureif she doesn't die of starvation firstrest here I am happy to Kitty Stories report that when I wrote on social media for my friends that I'd finished a Balzac that could be thus described as below Gareth immediately guessed 'Lost Illusions'? My comparison was presumably aptBlackadderdescribing a novel he's written 'Edmund A Butler's Tale A huge A Dirty Wedding Night: A Dirty Rockstar Romance Collection (Dirty, Book 2.5) roller coaster of a novel in four hundred sizzling chapters A searing indictment of domestic servitude in the eighteenth century with some hot gypsies thrown in'Okay so Balzac's novel is early nineteenth century it's hot teenage actresses not gypsies and the indictment is of society as a whole nothing escapes Balzac's eye But in spirit Lost Illusions is Edmund to a tee Sizzling Attentions Throbbing roller coaster 38th Edition Blue Book of Gun Values ride that never stops indeedDetail to comePosted earlierThis is premature but what a wonderful passage I've just The Mother Road read about one sixth into the book It could have been written last night about today Our hero in the business is explaining to the woman to whom he is proposing how the paper industry for printing worksAnd for this Conversations with Communication Theorists reason although linen lasts so much longer than cotton that it is in Betraying Beauty (Vegas Titans, reality cheaper in the end the poor would Design for How People Learn rather make the smaller outlay in the first instance and by virtue of the law of Vae victis pay enormously before they have done The middle classes do the same So there is a scarcity of linen In England where four fifths of the population use cotton to the exclusion of linen they make nothing but cotton paper The cotton paper is very soft and easily creased to begin with and it has a further defect it is so soluble that if you seep a book made of cotton paper in water for fifteen minutes it turns to a pulp while an old book left in water for a couple of hours is not spoilt You could dry the old book and the pages though yellow and faded would still be legible the work would not be destroyedThere is a time coming when legislation will eualize our fortunes and we shall all be poor together; we shall want our linen and our books to be cheap just as people are beginning to prefer small pictures because they have not wall space enough for large ones Well the shirts and the books will not last that is all; it is the same on all sides solidity is drying out So this problem is one of the first importance for literature science and politicsOne day in my office there was a hot discussion going on about the material that the Chinese use for making paper Their paper is far better than ours because the The Boyfriend Plan raw material is better; and a good deal was said about this thin light Chinese paper for if it is light and thin the texture is close there are no transparent spots in it In Paris there are learned men among the printers' Dark Reflections (Dark Reflections, readers; Fourier and Pierre Leroux are Lachevardiere's Vrolok readers at this moment; and the Comte de Saint Simon who happened to be correcting proofs for us came in in the middle of the discussion He told us at once that according to Kempfer and du Halde the Broussonetia furnishes the substance of the Chinese paper; it is a vegetable substance like linen or cotton for that matter Another Spinetinglers Anthology 2008 reader maintained that Chinese paper was principally made of an animal substance to wit the silk that is abundant there They made a bet about it in my presence The Messieurs Didot are printers to the Institute so naturally they My Fantoms referred the uestion to that learned body M Marcel who used to be superintendent of the Royal Printing Establishment was umpire and he sent the two 僕の愛を知れ! [Boku no Ai o Shire!] readers to M l'Abbe Grozier Librarian at the Arsenal By the Abbe's decision they both lost their wages The paper was not made of silk nor yet from the Broussonetia; the pulp proved to be the triturated fibre of some kind of bamboo The Abbe Grozier had a Chinese book an iconographical and technological work with a great many pictures in it illustrating all the different processes of paper making and he showed us a picture of the workshop with the bamboo stalks lying in a heap in the corner; it was extremely well drawn Lucien told me that your father with the intuition of a man of talent had a glimmering of a notion of some way of Angélique à Québec (Angelique: Original version replacing linen The Boy Who Would Not Say His Name rags with an exceedingly common vegetable product not previously manufactured but taken direct from the soil as the Chinese use vegetable fibre at first hand I have classified the guesses made by those who came before me and have begun to study the uestion The bamboo is a kind of Body Image, Eating Disorders, and Obesity reed; naturally I began to think of the Job-Hunting for the So-Called Handicapped reeds that grow here in FranceLabor is very cheap in China where a workman earns three halfpence a day and this cheapness of labor enables the Chinese to manipulate each sheet of paper separately They take it out of the mould and press it between heated tablets of white porcelain that is the secret of the surface and consistence the lightness and satin smoothness of the best paper in the world Well here in Europe the work must be done by machinery; machinery must take the place of cheap Chinese labor If we could but succeed in making a cheap paper of as good a uality the weight and thickness of printed books would be The Doughboys reduced by than one half A set of Voltaire printed on our woven paper and bound weighs about two hundred and fifty pounds; it would only weigh fifty if we used Chinese paper That surely would be a triumph for the housing of many books has come to be a difficulty; everything has grown smaller of late; this is not an age of giants; men have shrunk everything about them shrinks and house The Hunger Within room into the bargain Great mansions and great suites of The Cinnamon Tree On The Moon rooms will be abolished sooner or later in Paris for no one will afford to live in the great houses built by our forefathers What a disgrace for our age if none of its books should last Dutch paper that is paper made from flax will be uite unobtainable in ten years' time

summary ✓ eBook or Kindle ePUB ´ Honoré de Balzac

Illusions perdues

Learns that wherever he goes talent counts for nothing in comparison to money intrigue and unscrupulousness Lost Illusions is one of the greatest novels in the rich procession of the Comedie humaine Balzac's panoramic social and moral history of his times CONTRACT between the recent reader of Honoré de Balzac's Illusions perdues hereinafter the party of the first part and His Satanic Majesty Lucifer Prince of Darkness and Father of Lies hereinafter the party of the second partWHEREAS it is amply revealed in the aforementioned work of Balzac that Paris during the third decade of the nineteenth century offers unparalleled opportunities for the gifted and unscrupulous reviewer to exploit his skills to commercial and other advantage;WHEREAS the party of the first part having possession of such skills desires to receive adeuate recompense for them;WHEREAS the party of the second part having supernatural powers that place Him above the confines of space and time is capable of effecting the necessary bodily transport of persons to other ages and places;NOW THEREFORE IT IS HEREBY AGREED1 That the party of the first part will at their convenience be transported to the Paris of 1821 with their literary talents transposed into corresponding abilities in the French of the relevant period;2 That the party of the first part will be provided by the party of the second part with a guide suitably conversant with Parisian society who will undertake to introduce them into the journalistic circles where the party of the first part may make appropriate use of their talents;3 That the party of the first part will within a delay not exceeding ten 10 working days receive adeuate recompense for their literary productions such recompense including but not necessarily limited to gold coins magnificent dinners at fashionable restaurants fawning servility from well known authors in need of positive reviews offers from publishing houses to print works of prose and poetry written by the party of the first part and beautiful actresses inviting the party of the first part to their beds and declaring their undying love;4 That the party of the first part will enjoy the aforementioned benefits as long as they continue to produce reviews newspaper columns occasional articles and other writings as further specified in Schedule A;5 That in exchange for the above considerations the party of the first part solemnly pledges to transfer their immortal soul to the party of the second part to be the property of the party of the second part throughout all eternity;IN WITNESS WHEREOFthe agreement is duly executed as of the date first written aboveSignaturesA ReaderHis Satanic Majesty LuciferCODICILThe above notwithstanding if the party of the second part determines a conveniently located but otherwise euivalent venue where the party of the first part may receive adeuate recompense for their reviewing skills the party of the second part reserves the right instead to transport the party of the first part to the alternate venue all other clauses to persist in force unchangedInitialsARHSML Leftover Dead (Trailer Park Mystery, rich procession of the Comedie humaine Balzac's panoramic social and moral history of his times CONTRACT between the Witcheskin recent The Witches reader of Honoré de Balzac's Illusions perdues hereinafter the party of the first part and His Satanic Majesty Lucifer Prince of Darkness and Father of Lies hereinafter the party of the second partWHEREAS it is amply A Year in the Merde revealed in the aforementioned work of Balzac that Paris during the third decade of the nineteenth century offers unparalleled opportunities for the gifted and unscrupulous Jack Glass reviewer to exploit his skills to commercial and other advantage;WHEREAS the party of the first part having possession of such skills desires to Splinter receive adeuate Gilchrist: A Novel recompense for them;WHEREAS the party of the second part having supernatural powers that place Him above the confines of space and time is capable of effecting the necessary bodily transport of persons to other ages and places;NOW THEREFORE IT IS HEREBY AGREED1 That the party of the first part will at their convenience be transported to the Paris of 1821 with their literary talents transposed into corresponding abilities in the French of the Wired for Culture relevant period;2 That the party of the first part will be provided by the party of the second part with a guide suitably conversant with Parisian society who will undertake to introduce them into the journalistic circles where the party of the first part may make appropriate use of their talents;3 That the party of the first part will within a delay not exceeding ten 10 working days Archangels War (Guild Hunter, receive adeuate Breed of Innocence (The Breed Chronicles recompense for their literary productions such Me Write Book recompense including but not necessarily limited to gold coins magnificent dinners at fashionable The Princes Mistress restaurants fawning servility from well known authors in need of positive Cosmological Enigmas reviews offers from publishing houses to print works of prose and poetry written by the party of the first part and beautiful actresses inviting the party of the first part to their beds and declaring their undying love;4 That the party of the first part will enjoy the aforementioned benefits as long as they continue to produce Information Infrastructure for Enterprise Coordination and Integration reviews newspaper columns occasional articles and other writings as further specified in Schedule A;5 That in exchange for the above considerations the party of the first part solemnly pledges to transfer their immortal soul to the party of the second part to be the property of the party of the second part throughout all eternity;IN WITNESS WHEREOFthe agreement is duly executed as of the date first written aboveSignaturesA ReaderHis Satanic Majesty LuciferCODICILThe above notwithstanding if the party of the second part determines a conveniently located but otherwise euivalent venue where the party of the first part may Immortal Jellyfish receive adeuate At Hells Gate recompense for their California reviewing skills the party of the second part Never Goodbye (Albany Boys, reserves the Afgantsy right instead to transport the party of the first part to the alternate venue all other clauses to persist in force unchangedInitialsARHSML

Honoré de Balzac ´ 3 read & download

Handsome would be poet Lucien Chardon is poor and naive but highly ambitious Failing to make his name in his dull provincial hometown he is taken up by a patroness the captivating married woman Madame de Bargeton and prepares to forge his way in the glamor Unfortunately for most French people they were forced to read Balzac in school and were not given the real time or context to fully appreciate his work Plus they mostly only get the highly moralistic Peau de Chagrin and fed up finish their book report and never seek out Balzac again That is uite unfortunate particularly when it comes to this particular masterpiece In Illusions Perdues we have one of French literatures greatest bildungsroman ever with the coming of age of the two protagonists I will absolutely not spoil the story here because it must be read and enjoyed And please do not forget to read the wonderful seuel Splendeurs et Misères des Courtesans which is every bit as real and gripping and beautiful as this one Historic Hahns Peak read Balzac in school and were not given the Cupcakes, Lies, and Dead Guys (Annie Graceland Mystery real time or context to fully appreciate his work Plus they mostly only get the highly moralistic Peau de Chagrin and fed up finish their book Zombie CSU report and never seek out Balzac again That is uite unfortunate particularly when it comes to this particular masterpiece In Illusions Perdues we have one of French literatures greatest bildungsroman ever with the coming of age of the two protagonists I will absolutely not spoil the story here because it must be Conquerors read and enjoyed And please do not forget to The Legacy Chronicles: Chasing Ghosts read the wonderful seuel Splendeurs et Misères des Courtesans which is every bit as Deathcaster (Shattered Realms, real and gripping and beautiful as this one


10 thoughts on “Illusions perdues

  1. says:

    No man should marry until he has studied anatomy and dissected at least one woman When I left the farm at the age of 18 and jerry rigged my battered Camaro into a sputtering but functional machine that could by the grace of all that is holy get me to Phoenix I might have bore resemblance to Lucien de Rubempre the hero of Lost Illusions Well okay there were some differences I did not look like a Greek God I did not have David Sechard as a best friend who lent me his last 1000 francs for my trip to PhoenixParis I most importantly did not have an aristocratic companion in the form of Madame de Bargeton the ueen of society in Angouleme I definitely left the farm on the wrong footing As it turns out despite Lucien's advantages his spectacular rise and fall in Paris society far eclipsed my own bumpy yet steady meandering attempt to be successful in the big city Drawing from the Folio editionThe first hurdle to be cleared by both Lucien and Madame de Bargeton was entry into Parisian Aristocratic society Madame may have had the proper name but she had been in the sticks way too long and had fallen behind on the current fashions and the latest affectations Lucien though a beautiful manly specimen wore the wrong clothes Clothes that were very nice for the country but were outdated and ragged when compared to the festive clothing worn by the Parisian dandies In other words both found the other wanting and a detriment to their efforts to fit in to the society they wished to become accustomed too Madame de Bargeton in a fit of survival jettisoned her Greek God Lucien even though he had been thinking similar thoughts was upset over the betrayalplotted revenge and uickly found himself mired in poverty He took up with a bunch of philosophical writers who despite their superior intelligence or because of it refused to try and be successful As taken as Lucien is by their high ideals and their comradeship he uickly moves away from their company once he meets the con man Etienne Lousteau Drawing from the Folio editionLousteau calls himself a journalist but really he is a blackmailer glib tongue seducer and thief Lucien meets Lousteau at the moment that he is in a midst of a deal to become editor of a newspaper Lousteau likes Lucien importantly he sees that he can be of use to him and shows him how to use his pen to make money He ensnares him in the fine art of reviewing books taking the best ualities of a novel and negating those ualities by presenting them as weaknesses He shows him how to receive bribes in theater seats in exchange for positive reviews Lucien who was a good writer soon found himself in a position of writing positive and negative reviews of the same book or the same play and taking money from publishers not to eviscerate their latest offering Etienne and Lucien both are living with beautiful actresses and making a very good living but their lifestyle far outreaches their pocketbooks and soon each finds themselves on the edge of disgrace In an act of desperation Lucien forges David's signature on bank loans that have devastating conseuences for his friendbrother in lawand sister There are many subplots that are complicated enough that separate reviews could be composed for each Balzac does an amazing job juggling the plots without confusing the reader Each new revelation has far reaching ramifications and I found myself suirming in my seat as each new piece of the puzzle is revealed Balzac creates a whole host of characters wonderful characters some who have bit parts but have larger roles to play as part of the grander scheme of the world of the Human Comedy Characters flow in and out of his books In one book they may have a large role and in another a mere scene He wrote 92 books that composed the Human Comedy and had sketches for 55 He created over 3000 characters Balzac is surprisingly funny with skewering wit and a telescopic eye for human behavior He was part of the realism movement and the characters of these books are the same people that are serving us coffee delivering our mail writing newspaper articles and lending us money today People have the same foibles and good ualities as they did a hundred years ago In the form of Eve David's wife and Lucien's sister Balzac also reminds us of those few really special people that we occasionally meet who exemplify what we all wish to benice BalzacI got to say I'm hooked I am curious to see what happens to of these characters and in the span of one book I've only met a very few of the characters that Balzac brings to life in the Human Comedy I must meet the rest I will read BalzacIf you wish to see of my most recent book and movie reviews visit also have a Facebook blogger page at


  2. says:

    912 Illusions perdues Lost Illusions The Human Comedy 1799–1850 Honoré de BalzacIllusions is a serial novel written by the French writer Honoré de Balzac between 1837 and 1843 It consists of three parts starting in provincial France thereafter moving to Paris and finally returning to the provinces Thus it resembles another of Balzac’s greatest novels The Black Sheep 1842 in that it is set partly in Paris and partly in the provinces It is however uniue among the novels and short stories of The Human Comedy 1799–1850آرزوهای بر باد رفته انوره دو بالزاک امیرکبیر ادبیات فرانسه؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش روز بیست و ششم ماه می سال 1977 میلادیعنوان آرزوهای بر باد رفته؛ اثر انوره دو بالزاک؛ مترجم سعید نفیسی؛ مشخصات نشر تهران، امیرکبیر، 1337، در 744 ص، موضوع داستانهای نویسندگان فرانسه، سده 19 ماین رمان، در آن روزگاران، به بلندای شکوه و بیهمتایی دست یازید، زیرا «بالزاک» هماره دورنگر بودند، و فراتر را از روز جاری را میدیدند ایشان درمییابند، که پایان یافتن دوران قهرمانان، و تحول بورژوایی، باید به معنی آغاز خیزش عظیم سرمایه داری فرانسه باشد «آرزوهای برباد رفته»، حماسه ی «تراژی کمیکِ» سلطه ی سرمایه، بر اندیشه ها، و تبدیل شدن ادبیات، به کالا است درونمایه ی رمان، برآورده شدن بسیار گسترده ی این روند، سلطه ی سرمایه بر ذهن و اندیشه، و تراژدی نسل پس از ناپلئون را، در درون چارچوبی اجتماعی، جای میدهد بالزاک بسیار ژرفتر، از اینها را درک کرده است بالزاک این فرایند تبدیل ادبیات به کالا را، با تمامی ابعاد و جوانبش ترسیم میکند و مینگارد از تولید کاغذ گرفته، تا باورها، اندیشه ها، و احساسات نویسندگان، همه و همه، به کالا تبدیل میشوند، و «بالزاک» نیز به ذکر کلی پیآمدهای فکری، و نظری این سلطه ی سرمایه داری، بسنده نمیکند، بلکه در تمامی میدانها، فرایند واقعی سرمایه داری شدن را، در تمام مراحل، و با همه ی ویژگیهایش، آشکار میسازد ا شربیانی


  3. says:

    Unfortunately for most French people they were forced to read Balzac in school and were not given the real time or context to fully appreciate his work Plus they mostly only get the highly moralistic Peau de Chagrin and fed up finish their book report and never seek out Balzac again That is uite unfortunate particularly when it comes to this particular masterpiece In Illusions Perdues we have one of French literatures greatest bildungsroman ever with the coming of age of the two protagonists I will absolutely not spoil the story here because it must be read and enjoyed And please do not forget to read the wonderful seuel Splendeurs et Misères des Courtesans which is every bit as real and gripping and beautiful as this one


  4. says:

    The premise consisted of a lot I would like The printing industry for one an industry I have been working in for the entire 45 years of my working life And the literary arts us Goodreads people love that or we would not be here That issue of the urbane life of the major city over the provincial snobbery of the small town Everywhere in all times has this been a divide And the sheer greed of individuals over the dreamers who trust others no matter what we all like that in a story don’t we? Yep A heady mix that was guaranteed to be a successful read for me I would have thought But nope It all became a chore and a long one at that Nothing wrong with a long novel but when several paragraphs ramble on when the same point could be made with one then I admit to losing interest Is there anything wrong with the story and the writing? No but is just draaaaaaaaaged Goodreads friend Carl tells me that Henry James said something along the lines of one keeping ploughing onward certainly this sentence will end? you realize you'd rather be shot in the leg but the word 'classic' calls like duty you saddle up and head out one time Hee hee


  5. says:

    Some thoughts on the bookThis is such a wow of a novel I gather that Balzac in writing the vast book series of which this is one wanted it to be a document as much as work of fiction And so it is There is a level of detail about subjects like accounting in early nineteenth century France and the legal system that is hard to believe one could get away with selling in a work of fiction Then there is the paper industry the Chinese were to blame then as now the difficulties of cheap labour competition the bookselling industry and its corrupt links to the reviewing industry And the reviewing industry's corrupt links to just about anybody Reviewers who often scraped together the funds for their precarious existence by selling their review copies and the tickets they received as bribes from theatre managementsThen there is his cynical eye unblinking in its observation of the appalling nature of Parisian society not to mention the hand me down version as practised by the best of provincial society There are 'good people' depicted here but they are all self deluding dills and one wants nothing than to bang their heads together or make them sit in the corner with their backs to class until they reform or write a hundred times on the blackboard 'I will get real' Being 'good' is no way to escape the scathing judgement of Monsieur BalzacThat said there is one strange small group of men who stay true to their dedication to real literature as opposed to the rascally reviewers with whom Lucien goes astray And I feel like Balzac sees himself there They have no weaknesses they never betray themselves or each other They worship no false gods not fashion not wealth not status None of the things that are like oxygen to LucienI think Balzac needs them to balance David and Lucien's sister David is perfectly able to see Lucien as he really is but he can't do the right thing with that information David's ruination is that he knows everybody else without knowing himself at all At least Lucien's sister steps up to face the facts way too late for it to help their dire situation but still David remains in fourth grade writing those lines and sitting in the corner while she's going to get out of primary school for sureif she doesn't die of starvation firstrest here I am happy to report that when I wrote on social media for my friends that I'd finished a Balzac that could be thus described as below Gareth immediately guessed 'Lost Illusions'? My comparison was presumably aptBlackadderdescribing a novel he's written 'Edmund A Butler's Tale A huge roller coaster of a novel in four hundred sizzling chapters A searing indictment of domestic servitude in the eighteenth century with some hot gypsies thrown in'Okay so Balzac's novel is early nineteenth century it's hot teenage actresses not gypsies and the indictment is of society as a whole nothing escapes Balzac's eye But in spirit Lost Illusions is Edmund to a tee Sizzling roller coaster ride that never stops indeedDetail to comePosted earlierThis is premature but what a wonderful passage I've just read about one sixth into the book It could have been written last night about today Our hero in the business is explaining to the woman to whom he is proposing how the paper industry for printing worksAnd for this reason although linen lasts so much longer than cotton that it is in reality cheaper in the end the poor would rather make the smaller outlay in the first instance and by virtue of the law of Vae victis pay enormously before they have done The middle classes do the same So there is a scarcity of linen In England where four fifths of the population use cotton to the exclusion of linen they make nothing but cotton paper The cotton paper is very soft and easily creased to begin with and it has a further defect it is so soluble that if you seep a book made of cotton paper in water for fifteen minutes it turns to a pulp while an old book left in water for a couple of hours is not spoilt You could dry the old book and the pages though yellow and faded would still be legible the work would not be destroyedThere is a time coming when legislation will eualize our fortunes and we shall all be poor together; we shall want our linen and our books to be cheap just as people are beginning to prefer small pictures because they have not wall space enough for large ones Well the shirts and the books will not last that is all; it is the same on all sides solidity is drying out So this problem is one of the first importance for literature science and politicsOne day in my office there was a hot discussion going on about the material that the Chinese use for making paper Their paper is far better than ours because the raw material is better; and a good deal was said about this thin light Chinese paper for if it is light and thin the texture is close there are no transparent spots in it In Paris there are learned men among the printers' readers; Fourier and Pierre Leroux are Lachevardiere's readers at this moment; and the Comte de Saint Simon who happened to be correcting proofs for us came in in the middle of the discussion He told us at once that according to Kempfer and du Halde the Broussonetia furnishes the substance of the Chinese paper; it is a vegetable substance like linen or cotton for that matter Another reader maintained that Chinese paper was principally made of an animal substance to wit the silk that is abundant there They made a bet about it in my presence The Messieurs Didot are printers to the Institute so naturally they referred the uestion to that learned body M Marcel who used to be superintendent of the Royal Printing Establishment was umpire and he sent the two readers to M l'Abbe Grozier Librarian at the Arsenal By the Abbe's decision they both lost their wages The paper was not made of silk nor yet from the Broussonetia; the pulp proved to be the triturated fibre of some kind of bamboo The Abbe Grozier had a Chinese book an iconographical and technological work with a great many pictures in it illustrating all the different processes of paper making and he showed us a picture of the workshop with the bamboo stalks lying in a heap in the corner; it was extremely well drawn Lucien told me that your father with the intuition of a man of talent had a glimmering of a notion of some way of replacing linen rags with an exceedingly common vegetable product not previously manufactured but taken direct from the soil as the Chinese use vegetable fibre at first hand I have classified the guesses made by those who came before me and have begun to study the uestion The bamboo is a kind of reed; naturally I began to think of the reeds that grow here in FranceLabor is very cheap in China where a workman earns three halfpence a day and this cheapness of labor enables the Chinese to manipulate each sheet of paper separately They take it out of the mould and press it between heated tablets of white porcelain that is the secret of the surface and consistence the lightness and satin smoothness of the best paper in the world Well here in Europe the work must be done by machinery; machinery must take the place of cheap Chinese labor If we could but succeed in making a cheap paper of as good a uality the weight and thickness of printed books would be reduced by than one half A set of Voltaire printed on our woven paper and bound weighs about two hundred and fifty pounds; it would only weigh fifty if we used Chinese paper That surely would be a triumph for the housing of many books has come to be a difficulty; everything has grown smaller of late; this is not an age of giants; men have shrunk everything about them shrinks and house room into the bargain Great mansions and great suites of rooms will be abolished sooner or later in Paris for no one will afford to live in the great houses built by our forefathers What a disgrace for our age if none of its books should last Dutch paper that is paper made from flax will be uite unobtainable in ten years' time


  6. says:

    Honore de Balzac wasn't finished writing yet when he died on 18 August 1850 Yet at the time of his death he had already written a good number of journal articles and some 90 novels The literary characters he had created are estimated to be between 2000 to 3000 Was he sick? Did he have some sort of a mania for writing on and on? No The secret of his prolificness I guess was in his favorite drink It was said that at one time he wrote for 18 straight hours without sleep subsisting only on black coffeeCAFE BALZAC would be a nice name for a coffee shop The different brews offered there could be named after his novels Pere Goriot Louis Lambert Cousin Bette Cousin Pons Eugenie Grandet etc Lost Illusions would be in a monster of a cup Having it should be like endlessly sipping an ocean of coffee Black with enough caffeine to shock one's nerves and make him want to write to calm himselfThis is the story of Lucien Chardon a cake in the coffee shop could be named after him lucien sounds luscious a young handsome poet well intentioned but vain and stupid Living in a provincial town he dreams of getting rich and famous He catches the fancy of the aristocratic Madame de Bagerton married but a real hot mama Thinking that they are in love with each other they go to gay Paris There they promptly lose their illusion about this love They part ways bitterlyDestitute and hungry Lucien befriends fellow poets writers and artists who although similarly poor like him value personal and creative integrity above all else But he also stumbles upon characters including journalists who value money above all else He is sucked into this life of double dealing journalistic blackmail corruption and dishonesty enjoying it for the money fame and sex it brings He is again disillusioned but likes the compensationThis new society he has embraced however does not embrace him back He is betrayed and rejected Thus he loses another illusion and comes back to his hometown like a beaten dog with his tail between his legsBut alas It seems his town considers him a hero of sorts with the fleeting fame and momentary wealth he had acuired before So he struts his feathers once and attempts to save his loved ones his mother sister and her husband David who is also his best friend from the ruin he has brought them into This however proves to be illusory once He now walks alone planning to drown himself But he meets a 48 year old Spanish priest Hey I said to myself a happy ending after all A man of God shall be an instrument to Lucien's redemption But no It was my turn to lose an illusion This priest's advice to Lucien sounds like it is based on Machiavelli's The Prince than on the Holy Bible He may even be harboring sexy thoughts because after giving Lucien money and promising him a job as his secretary he kissed him on the forehead tenderly Balzac however took care to point out alluding to the profound friendship of man to man whichmakes woman of no accountThe descriptions here of characters places legal proceedings the printing business paper making parties the theater intrigues and what not are so lush that reading them is like wading through the foliage of the jungle during the time of the dinosaurs For its dialogues the characters often throw full length essays against each other; thoughts and recollections were sometimes like treatises; and characters are so numerous they swarm like ants on a pool of molassesSix hundred thirty pages excluding endnotes the introduction Balzac's brief biographical outline and comments on him and his works by various authors You''ll need a lot of coffee to get through this But it's all worth it may I add


  7. says:

    CONTRACT between the recent reader of Honoré de Balzac's Illusions perdues hereinafter the party of the first part and His Satanic Majesty Lucifer Prince of Darkness and Father of Lies hereinafter the party of the second partWHEREAS it is amply revealed in the aforementioned work of Balzac that Paris during the third decade of the nineteenth century offers unparalleled opportunities for the gifted and unscrupulous reviewer to exploit his skills to commercial and other advantage;WHEREAS the party of the first part having possession of such skills desires to receive adeuate recompense for them;WHEREAS the party of the second part having supernatural powers that place Him above the confines of space and time is capable of effecting the necessary bodily transport of persons to other ages and places;NOW THEREFORE IT IS HEREBY AGREED1 That the party of the first part will at their convenience be transported to the Paris of 1821 with their literary talents transposed into corresponding abilities in the French of the relevant period;2 That the party of the first part will be provided by the party of the second part with a guide suitably conversant with Parisian society who will undertake to introduce them into the journalistic circles where the party of the first part may make appropriate use of their talents;3 That the party of the first part will within a delay not exceeding ten 10 working days receive adeuate recompense for their literary productions such recompense including but not necessarily limited to gold coins magnificent dinners at fashionable restaurants fawning servility from well known authors in need of positive reviews offers from publishing houses to print works of prose and poetry written by the party of the first part and beautiful actresses inviting the party of the first part to their beds and declaring their undying love;4 That the party of the first part will enjoy the aforementioned benefits as long as they continue to produce reviews newspaper columns occasional articles and other writings as further specified in Schedule A;5 That in exchange for the above considerations the party of the first part solemnly pledges to transfer their immortal soul to the party of the second part to be the property of the party of the second part throughout all eternity;IN WITNESS WHEREOFthe agreement is duly executed as of the date first written aboveSignaturesA ReaderHis Satanic Majesty LuciferCODICILThe above notwithstanding if the party of the second part determines a conveniently located but otherwise euivalent venue where the party of the first part may receive adeuate recompense for their reviewing skills the party of the second part reserves the right instead to transport the party of the first part to the alternate venue all other clauses to persist in force unchangedInitialsARHSML


  8. says:

    Lost Illusions tells the story of a good looking young man who lusts after fame in Paris and as a result brings his supportive good natured provincial family to bankruptcy It's a rather long winded novel In common with many 19th century novelists Balzac does like to give elaborate descriptions of everything he sees Thus every room is presented to us in meticulous detail wonderful if you want to research interior design in 19th century France; on the tedious side otherwise; every character's physiognomy is put under a microscope even though they may never appear again It's a facet of the novel that has been greatly improved over the decades He's also rather over keen on aphorisms But on the whole this was a brilliantly moving novel which very convincingly created an entire world in a particular moment of history In an ideal world though it would be clipped of a couple hundred of its very many pages


  9. says:

    For me there are a great many things that contribute to a rewarding reading experience an almost ineffable series of ualities that a novel must possess for me to be able to enjoy it Indeed these things are what I am looking for when I am sat on my bed losing my mind for days on end surrounded by shaky towers of books Yet there is perhaps a single fairly straightforward thing that elevates my favourites above the others which is that I see something of myself in them The of myself I see the I cherish the book I imagine most people feel that way There is however one book that feels almost as though the author was possessed of the ability to see into the future to fasten onto some kid from northern England and follow his progress or deterioration over the space of around twelve months That book is Lost Illusions by Honore de BalzacI don’t of course want to make the entire review about me again but I find it impossible to think or write about Lost Illusions without referencing my experiences without putting my gushing into some context so because the book is certainly flawed if I view it dispassionately so let me tell a little story and get it all out; let my story serve as a kind of introduction When I was nineteen I met and fell for a model who lived in London Until I met her I was pretty uninterested in girls; I mean obviously I liked them and all but I wasn’t crazy about them Coming from where I come from I didn’t really know that girls could be as elegant and beautiful as this particular girl The I liked her the time I spent in London until I was pretty much living there For a while I enjoyed myself immensely; the girl was on the cusp of success and took me to lots of parties and events I adored London I was starstruck If you’re a working class kid from Sheffield and you have this gorgeous girlfriend who is fawned over everywhere and you yourself for being with her are fawned over also it is difficult to maintain perspectiveHowever after a while things started to go awry I began to notice that the people around her and around me who I had trusted were actually only looking out for themselves Almost one by one I realised this The scales falling from my eyes was a painful process so much so that I almost went down with them It was I came to understand impossible to have friends in London or in those kinds of fashionable circles anyway that the people who smiled at you were likely plotting to stab you in the back Slowly I started to pick up their habits to become cynical and two faced and manipulative because I thought that the only way to survive Before too long I was living in a moral vacuum where cheap sex drugs and social climbing were the norm It wasn’t until I returned home back to Sheffield that I came to understand how much I had changed I lost something in London something that I guess everyone loses at some point in their life What had I lost? My illusionsLucien Chardon’s story arc is eerily similar to mine He is a provincial poet who moves to Paris thinking that he will find fame and fortune What he finds instead is that people in a big city will happily crawl over your carcass in the pursuit of their own wants and desires He finds that everything and everyone in Paris is false even if they appear absolutely to be the opposite Lucien like myself is green and in the end Paris swallows him up Of course this kind of story is not particular to me or Lucien but you have to credit Balzac for nailing it It shouldn’t but still does amaze me that human beings have changed so little over hundreds of years The funny thing is that at the start of Lost Illusions I scoffed at Lucien Chardon I inwardly belittled him judged him harshly and uite literally at times rolled my eyes at him I suppose the reason for that is that not only was his story like mine but his character also and that embarrassed me I even put the book down two or three times actually abandoned it because I realised later I wanted to distance myself from Lucien Chardon is psychologically emotionally at war with himself Part of him is thoughtful artistic sensitive and another part is ruthless and ambitious and self serving This is what makes Lucien human to the reader; he knows what the right thing is and feels drawn to that course of action and yet because he is so self obsessed is able to convince himself that what ultimately serves his own desires is the right thing and will in the end produce the best results for everyone even if he has to trample on them in the meantime This is I would guess why Balzac chose to call his protagonist a name that resembles the most seriously fallen the most humanly flawed character in literature LuciferStructurally Lost Illusions is really clever In the beginning Lucien plays court to Madame de Bargeton the fashionable matriarch of Angouleme and thinks when he wins her that he has done all the hard work has won the finest victory has raised himself to the top only to find when they move to Paris that his victory is worthless is nothing and that there is a much greater difficult war to fight the fight to bring Paris under his heel It’s a little bit like when playing a computer game and you destroy what you think is the end of level bossbad guy only to find that actually it was just some minion and the real boss is waiting for you around the next corner and he is fucking huge What unravels after the opening section is as noted a tale of treachery and double dealing of Shakespearean proportions but I do not want to linger over all that It’s great of course but I have written plenty about it already and any would lead to serious spoilers There are however numerous other fascinating ideas and themes present in the bookPerhaps the most obvious concern is that of money; indeed it was Balzac’s most persistent theme the one that found its way into nearly all his work Lucien is of low birth and so has barely a franc to his name Yet his ambitions reuire capital One needs money to make money One needs money to grease wheels; one needs it to convince others of your worth So it goes As well as Lucien’s story Balzac gives some space to David Sechard Lucien’s brother in law David enters the novel as the son of old Sechard the bear who is engaged in selling his printing press to his progeny for an exorbitant price David agrees even though he knows the press isn’t worth what his old man is asking for it and ultimately ends up in a dire financial predicament Balzac it seems to me was torn between trying to show the evils of money while showcasing its absolute necessity Many of the characters in Lost Illusions do horrendous things for it yet the most kindhearted most sympathetic suffer horribly from want of it Related to what the author has to say about money is the idea that there is a tension between art and commerce Lucien at one point in the novel has a choice to make between being an artist or journalist One will reuire hard work but will lead to artistic fulfilment and perhaps fame and fortune eventually the other will lead to uick and easy gains but artistic bankruptcy The author appears to be suggesting that it is near impossible to be an artist in a world so obsessed with money that the lure of money will lead genius astrayThe most interesting aspect of the novel for me is what Balzac has to say about old and new approaches In discussion of the paper business and journalism he makes the point numerous times that things are becoming cheaper of lesser uality Indeed David is an inventor and he embarks on experiments in order to create a cheaper lighter kind of paper It’s not just paper either but Balzac points out clothes and furniture are not as well made as they once were will not last as long Even artwork is being downsized made readily available It is a kind of cheapening in step with the times in step with the moral character of the people Even professions are not what they once were with journalism being derided as a fully corrupt occupation when it could in fact be a noble form of employment Once again I laud Balzac’s insight his prescience because isn’t this exactly how the world is these days? Everything is plastic crap will fall apart after a couple of days; and everything is up for sale And aren’t the press a bunch of talentless hyenas who praise and condemn with one eye on their own purse?As i am sure is obvious by now I passionately love Lost Illusions but as I mentioned earlier it is not without flaws David for example is excruciating He’s a complete nincompoop No matter what Lucien does he stands by him like the craziest kind of put upon girlfriend It’s fucking infuriating No one unless sex is in the mix somewhere is that bloody gormless that forgiving Balzac took Dickens’ saintly women archetype and furnished it with a penis and even less good sense Secondly this being a novel written in the 1800’s and it being Balzac in particular Lost Illusions is a melodrama So if people constantly wringing their hands and bursting into tears every two pages over absolutely nothing grinds your gears then you might want to re think reading it The melodrama didn’t bother me though it never really does; Shakespeare is melodrama too let’s not forget Finally Lucien we are led to believe is a potentially great poet even potentially a man of genius and well what little of his poetry is presented to us is uh shit That’s a bit of a problem I did wonder if Balzac was portraying Lucien as a great poet in jest bearing in mind much of his novel is concerned with falsehood and how the least talented often prosper which Lucien did at one stage However having read around the book a little it does not seem as though that is the case that Honore was in earnest about Lucien’s greatness and talent even though to my mind it would have been better had he been intentionally rubbish In any case none of that compromised my enjoyment too much For a novel concerned with writing with talent and greatness it is uite apt that it is itself a work of genius


  10. says:

    Lost Illusions is a trilogy consisting of1Two Poets 2A Distinguished Provincial at Paris 3Ève and David Note links to the Librivox recordings are in parentheses They are to be read in this order There is little repeat of information as you pass from one book to the next Originally published separately in 1837 1839 and 1843 they are nowadays often collected into one volume with the title Lost Illusions or Illusions Perdues in French The trilogy is followed by a seuel entitled Scenes from a Courtesan's Life I will not be continuing; Lost Illusions is enough for me Honoré de Balzac 1799 1850 is considered one of the founders of European realism due to his sharp observation of detail and his unfiltered representation of French society What this book does and it does it in spades is draw provincial and Parisian life during the post Napoleonic era in other words France during Bourbon Restoration Events are set primarily in the 1820s in both Paris and the town Angoulême which is located in the Nouvelle Auitaine region of southwestern France It details and the details are copious the burgeoning paper industry the publishing trade journalism and political machinations as well as the world of theater and literature People of the upper class as well as those aspiring to climb the social ladder Actors and actresses loose women and scoundrels writers and poets are all meticulously described—what they eat what they wear and what they do The cast of characters is large If research is your thing this book is a treasure trove a bonanzaHowever for an ordinary reader the copious details may be considered excessive I did not need to know how to set up a printing press or the precise fees and comparative costs of different products or a day by day review of tasks of the trade There can in fact be too much of a good thing This will of course depend on what you are looking for On completion of the book I felt drained and worn out I was tired of forcing myself to try and make sense of the devious characters’ convoluted and tricky deals I was extremely happy when the book finally came to an end Do you want the truth? There it is Balzac wrote of what he knew He was a printer a journalist and a writer The central characters of the book are too Both he and his characters had to deal with bankruptcy misalliances and crooked deals Individuals behave duplicitly and in business corruption and wheeling and dealing is the norm What is drawn is so detailed and so realistic that one senses that that which is said is based on true events events which the author has himself experienced In 1826 Balzac opened a printing business in Paris It went bust In 1836 he bought the newspaper La Chroniue de Paris Later in 1840 he started La Revue Parisienne These too were failures The version I listened to is translated by Ellen Marriage 1865 1946 The majority of the lines read well but not all Some are clumsily expressed and there are lines the meaning of which I simply had to guess at from their context Bruce Pirie narrates the audiobook at Librivox It was pretty darn good He reads clearly and at a good speed without excessive dramatization The narration I have given three stars I will keep an eye out for this narrator at Librivox in the future The book contains tons and tons of information and for this reason it is good that it has been written but I found it tediousPère Goriot 4 starsThe Unknown Masterpiece 4 starsCousin Bette 3 starsEugénie Grandet 3 starsLa Rabouilleuse 3 starsLost Illusions 2 stars Scenes from a Courtesan's Life maybeThe Magic Skin maybe