characters Aerotropolis: The Way We'll Live Next 107


characters Aerotropolis: The Way We'll Live Next

Aerotropolis: The Way We'll Live Next

D the pattern inside out Soon the airport will be at the center and the city will be built around it the better to keep workers suppliers executives and goods in touch with the global market This is the aerotropolis a combination of giant airport planned city shipping facility and business hub The aerotropolis approach to urban living is now reshaping life in Seoul and Amsterdam in China and India in Dallas and Washington DC The aerotropolis is the frontier of the next phase of globalization whether we like it or not J This book is invigorating and annoying in eual measure which is a shame as it's one of the most thought provoking looks at our future that I've readThe central thrust of the argument is that future cities will grow up around airports in the same way that they did around rivers canals railways and roads This has a lot of social implications for the way we will lead our lives or at least the way some of us will lead our lives And this is where the annoyance begins The poor? Forget them If they can't afford to fly they are not worthy of consideration except that maybe we can employ them to sell us burgers at the airport The environment? Don't worry about that we'll soon have invented airplanes that fly on water Or somethingAlthough social implications are mentioned a lot they aren't really examined deeply For example when half of Asia starts boarding 'planes to fly West what is likely to happen? What are they coming for? Just business? Just sightseeing? The author dismisses the current eighty thousand rural protests a year in China in half a sentence The attitude seems to be Just give them an airport and they'll be happy as they can go shopping in New York But if there 's one thing humans want than stuff it's freedom freedom to watch unlimited porn or worship Jedi Knights or blast their brains with cheap booze or gorge themselves sick on junk food The world envies America not for its affluence but for the ability to dream that one day you could have it ALL and that nothing is stopping you What's the point of jumping on that brand spanking new China Airlines Airbus A380 from New York home to Guangzhou to get arrested at customs for having a copy of Asian Babes in your suitcase and never seeing your family again for twenty years?It seems to me that this book was written by engineers for engineers People are units pretty much But here is where the other annoyance came in People are units except when they are heroes changing the way we live with their visionary dreams The author has an irritating habit of highlighting sole individuals to underpin his argument along the lines of Have you used an iPhone today an iPad read a Kindle cooked with a microwave watched your flat screen TV through a satellite box while waiting for a call through your Bluetooth headset? If so then you can thank Fred Buckwad for all of this One guy gets the following accolade Picture Steve Jobs advising Obama that's Victor Fung If ever there was an argument NOT to meet someone surely that is it? It's the same annoying and sloppy habit that says Henry Ford invented the car that the Wright Brothers invented flying or that Tim Berners Lee invented the internet Okay you can usually live with such generalisations but the sheer number of them in this book began to seriously bug me The cult of the individual maybe if airlines treated you like an individual yourself you'd be prone to take flights And this for me was one of the major weaknesses in the book we don't all want to fly twice a week we really don't It's such a rotten experience unless you can go business that I find myself actively avoiding long haul these days I mean what am I going to find in America Australia Tokyo wherever? Increasingly the same food the same shops the same BBC World on TV the same hotel chains mix of people and so on You might as well stay at home really Wouldn't this be the ultimate irony? That airports change the world so much that they make it increasingly the same and trigger their own obsolescence? Maybe there's a book in that?

summary ✓ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ↠ John D. Kasarda

Ohn D Kasarda defined the term aerotropolis and he is now sought after worldwide as an adviser Working with Kasarda's ideas and research the gifted journalist Greg Lindsay gives us a vivid at times disuieting look at these instant cities in the making the challenges they present to our environment and our usual ways of life and the opportunities they offer to those who can exploit them creatively Aerotropolis is news from the near future news we urgently need if we are to understand the changing world and our place in I bought this book at the recommendation of a friend and it truly opened my eyes It's a great read and makes you realise where the world is goingInterestingly I made an observation on Twitter about Boris Island and uoted the book The author responded and we had a chat about his views and theoriesEnjoyable informative read if you want to better understand the future of trade and business Off-side is now sought after worldwide as an adviser Working with Kasarda's Esclava Medieval: La Sumisión retorcida en Placer por un Matrimonio de Conveniencia (Novela Romántica y Erótica en Español: Fantasía nº 1) (Spanish Edition) ideas and research the gifted journalist Greg Lindsay gives us a vivid at times disuieting look at these Enséñame más instant cities Wonder (The Books of Marvella, in the making the challenges they present to our environment and our usual ways of life and the opportunities they offer to those who can exploit them creatively Aerotropolis Chicago Billionaires - Contemporary Romance Series Boxed Set is news from the near future news we urgently need The Valhalla Prophecy (Nina Wilde & Eddie Chase if we are to understand the changing world and our place The Tunnel in I bought this book at the recommendation of a friend and Secretos del Cosmos it truly opened my eyes It's a great read and makes you realise where the world The Secret Treasons is goingInterestingly I made an observation on Twitter about Boris Island and uoted the book The author responded and we had a chat about his views and theoriesEnjoyable مريض الوهم informative read The Hypochondriacs Guide To Life And Death if you want to better understand the future of trade and business

John D. Kasarda ↠ 7 read

This brilliant and eye opening look at the new phenomenon called the aerotropolis gives us a glimpse of the way we will live in the near future and the way we will do business tooNot so long ago airports were built near cities and roads connected the one to the other This pattern the city in the center the airport on the periphery shaped life in the twentieth century from the central city to exurban sprawl Today the ubiuity of jet travel round the clock workdays overnight shipping and global business networks has turne As far as I can tell this book is a collaboration between a jobbing journalist and a consultant offering advice on building airports to foster economic growthThe journalism element dominates the book gallops along with interesting stories peppered with interviews and anecdotes I was less clear on the overarching theories of Kasarda the tireless advocate of airports for everywhereWhat you get is a look at the world through the lens of new and planned airports along with the importance of connectivity I felt that the first half got a bit stodgy with a few too many tales of American airports the second half taking in Holland Africa and China was interesting There were a few journalistic faux pas at one point the book refers to ‘last year’ and it does assume far too much knowledge of America and American businesses Where it was on topics that I knew it seemed sound possibly because they were citing books that I have read I do however wonder if China perhaps backed the wrong horse in seeking to be the factory of the world when India’s strategy of being the call centreback office for the world might end up being the lucrative and sustainable


5 thoughts on “Aerotropolis: The Way We'll Live Next

  1. says:

    As far as I can tell this book is a collaboration between a jobbing journalist and a consultant offering advice on building airports to foster economic growthThe journalism element dominates the book gallops along with interesting stories peppered with interviews and anecdotes I was less clear on the overarching theories of Kasarda the tireless advocate of airports for everywhereWhat you get is a look at the world through the lens of new and planned airports along with the importance of connectivity I felt that the first half got a bit stodgy with a few too many tales of American airports the second half taking in Holland Africa and China was interesting There were a few journalistic faux pas at one point the book refers to ‘last year’ and it does assume far too much knowledge of America and American businesses Where it was on topics that I knew it seemed sound possibly because they were citing books that I have read I do however wonder if China perhaps backed the wrong horse in seeking to be the factory of the world when India’s strategy of being the call centreback office for the world might end up being the lucrative and sustainable


  2. says:

    This book is invigorating and annoying in eual measure which is a shame as it's one of the most thought provoking looks at our future that I've readThe central thrust of the argument is that future cities will grow up around airports in the same way that they did around rivers canals railways and roads This has a lot of social implications for the way we will lead our lives or at least the way some of us will lead our lives And this is where the annoyance begins The poor? Forget them If they can't afford to fly they are not worthy of consideration except that maybe we can employ them to sell us burgers at the airport The environment? Don't worry about that we'll soon have invented airplanes that fly on water Or somethingAlthough social implications are mentioned a lot they aren't really examined deeply For example when half of Asia starts boarding 'planes to fly West what is likely to happen? What are they coming for? Just business? Just sightseeing? The author dismisses the current eighty thousand rural protests a year in China in half a sentence The attitude seems to be Just give them an airport and they'll be happy as they can go shopping in New York But if there 's one thing humans want than stuff it's freedom freedom to watch unlimited porn or worship Jedi Knights or blast their brains with cheap booze or gorge themselves sick on junk food The world envies America not for its affluence but for the ability to dream that one day you could have it ALL and that nothing is stopping you What's the point of jumping on that brand spanking new China Airlines Airbus A380 from New York home to Guangzhou to get arrested at customs for having a copy of Asian Babes in your suitcase and never seeing your family again for twenty years?It seems to me that this book was written by engineers for engineers People are units pretty much But here is where the other annoyance came in People are units except when they are heroes changing the way we live with their visionary dreams The author has an irritating habit of highlighting sole individuals to underpin his argument along the lines of Have you used an iPhone today an iPad read a Kindle cooked with a microwave watched your flat screen TV through a satellite box while waiting for a call through your Bluetooth headset? If so then you can thank Fred Buckwad for all of this One guy gets the following accolade Picture Steve Jobs advising Obama that's Victor Fung If ever there was an argument NOT to meet someone surely that is it? It's the same annoying and sloppy habit that says Henry Ford invented the car that the Wright Brothers invented flying or that Tim Berners Lee invented the internet Okay you can usually live with such generalisations but the sheer number of them in this book began to seriously bug me The cult of the individual maybe if airlines treated you like an individual yourself you'd be prone to take flights And this for me was one of the major weaknesses in the book we don't all want to fly twice a week we really don't It's such a rotten experience unless you can go business that I find myself actively avoiding long haul these days I mean what am I going to find in America Australia Tokyo wherever? Increasingly the same food the same shops the same BBC World on TV the same hotel chains mix of people and so on You might as well stay at home really Wouldn't this be the ultimate irony? That airports change the world so much that they make it increasingly the same and trigger their own obsolescence? Maybe there's a book in that?


  3. says:

    I bought this book at the recommendation of a friend and it truly opened my eyes It's a great read and makes you realise where the world is goingInterestingly I made an observation on Twitter about Boris Island and uoted the book The author responded and we had a chat about his views and theoriesEnjoyable informative read if you want to better understand the future of trade and business


  4. says:

    I enjoyed this book I was afraid as it was written by an academic that it might be dry and technical however the writing duties were handled by Greg Lindsay who does a great job explaining the topics in laymen terms as well as putting in the right amount of scepticism in the topic The book proposes some compelling uestions how do we balance the contradiction that we hate living near airports but wherever they are built we start to build housing around them? Can a city who is down on its luck lift itself into prosperity by building an integrated aero city? The answers are not clear at this time but it provides a good basis from which to read further as airports and their cities develop over the next decades


  5. says:

    Book arrived with ripped pages back cover muddy with scrathes


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