review We Are Anonymous Inside the Hacker World of LulzSec Anonymous ä PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free

Parmy Olson ☆ 5 review

We Are Anonymous Inside the Hacker World of LulzSec Anonymous

Chan many others were masterminded by a small tight knit group of hackers who formed a splinter group of Anonymous called LulzSec The legend of Anonymous and LulzSec grew in the wake of each ambitious hack But how were they penetrating intricate corporate security systems? Were they anarchists or activists? Teams or lone wolves? A cabal of skilled hackers or a disorganized bunch of kids?WE ARE ANONYMOUS delves deep into the internet's underbelly to tell the incredible full story of the global cyber insurgency movement and its implications for the future of computer securit Fascinating look at the world of Anonymous I learned many lessons from this 1 Anonymous is not really a group at least not one with a hierarchy 2 Most people in Anonymous have average or slightly above average computer skills these are called script kiddies 3 Those that have great computer skills are revered but they're not leaders 4 Several of the attacks that the group has carried out weren't political but done for the lulz embarrassing someone else publicly for fun 5 Most big companies employ only the most basic of security measures on the Web 6 You never know when you're attracting the attention of someone who hates you 7 Each level of security you employ increases your chances of outstripping a hacker's attention span You may never reach 100% but many people who spend the vast majority of their time online have short attention spans and get bored easily So the goal of your online security isn't just to outsmart the smartest guy in Anonymous it's to outlive his attention span The saying There are no girls on the Internet in this case is true The VAST majority of hackers are male You never know who is watching and you probably wouldn't know whether someone has broken into your accounts until they MAKE it known Someone could watch you for months amassing a file and eventually publish it for the sole purpose of embarrassing you 8 Several in Anonymous who thought they were truly anonymous got a harsh lesson when the roles were reversed and it turned out the FBI and European authorities were watching Three key players were arrested One was arrested months before the others and was uickly turned into an informant 9 Many of the memes saying and culture of the Internet originated with Anonymous and hacker culture 10 Anonymous is not your friend Almost any political intent is something you read into it If it gets a chance to embarrass a person or an entity it will And that someone could be you It's sort of a faceless version of the Joker from Nolan's version of Batman Some men just want to watch the world burn

review We Are Anonymous Inside the Hacker World of LulzSec Anonymous

10 thousands of hacktivists joined a mass digital assault on the websites of VISA MasterCard and PayPal to protest their treatment of WikiLeaks Other targets were wide ranging the websites of corporations from Sony Entertainment and Fox to the Vatican and the Church of Scientology were hacked defaced and embarrassed and the message was that no one was safe Thousands of user accounts from pornography websites were released exposing government employees and military personnelAlthough some attacks were perpetrated by masses of users who were rallied on the message boards of 4 Attended an IT conference today and one of the first speakers talked about the credit card hack on target and how it caused target to shift gears from developing what is cool for the consumer to redefining it's most critical programs to focus on credit card thieves Wow this just after finishing the book a couple days early So how does this relate to this book Will write that at the endFirst I have to say WOW a truly enjoyable book and a great history of how Anonymous came to be It brought back a lot of old memories of hanging out in IRC chat rooms back in the early 90's yes they existed back then with clients like MIRC and others never to the extreme of these folks and never in AOL rooms Thanks Parmy for delivering how Anonymous came to be how it fought among itself to find the right voice as well as how they went about their hacks Working in IT mostly the project side and not the technical side for several years I would hear about sites that were hacked what our company was doing about it etc Never did I think about the devious ways that hacks have gotten into systems nor how they even discover these bugs in the first place Yes Anonymous would expose several sites online and yes I think there is a positive side to calling out the companies that have been lying to consumers Some of the hacks however seem to be from foreign governments etc and my curiosity is what we are doing about it Seems like Anonymous is global from the book and the like to find vulnerable sites to rile up the folks Have they ever tried however to hack the hackers in foreign lands? Maybe there is a way to have Anonymous help folks by exposing those folks and what they've gotten away with As for credit cards and other hacks The social engineering side of this book was great Not only did it raise an eyebrow or two when it was covered but I next went out and started deleting some FB connections that seemed out of place So tie that to tonight Great 1st episode of the final season of Persons of interest An old AI is resurrected in the end to begin the fight back The concept of hacking comes up and malware Listening to this it's almost like Anonymous could be the cause yes I know it's not but how they described the malware in the firmware etc ones got to think maybe this already occurred Wrapping this back to Target and knowing no one is probably reading down this far in my diatribe of ramblings During my meeting today cyber security came up several times and I found myself recommending Yes than 5 times to some folks that were talking about this topic At the end of the day I wound up talking with the keynote about White and Black hackers and their purposes and I freaking knew what I was talking about all from this book and all from the correlated learning throughout the day Sorry I can't give it a 5 but it's a very very high 4 if I could score it that way Not sure if Parmy Olson the author would read this but if it is read I'd just like to say thanks for showing me this world the crap I need to do better at home etcfin

characters Ö PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ☆ Parmy Olson

A thrilling exclusive expose of the hacker collectives Anonymous and LulzSec WE ARE ANONYMOUS is the first full account of how a loosely assembled group of hackers scattered across the globe formed a new kind of insurgency seized headlines and tortured the feds and the ultimate betrayal that would eventually bring them down Parmy Olson goes behind the headlines and into the world of Anonymous and LulzSec with unprecedented access drawing upon hundreds of conversations with the hackers themselves including exclusive interviews with all six core members of LulzSec In late 20 I'm going to talk about the book but then I'm going to riff on the subjectOlson's deft narrative of how Anonymous organized out of the chaotic prankishness of 4chan and eventually in some ways obviously fragmented and fell apart is deceptively accomplished The book runs chronologically helping us newbies newfags in the language of this community get a handle on what happened when and where neatly tracking a linear path from early dickishness on discussion boards to a organized ethos against any constraints on internet freedom that aligned sort of with politics from Wikileaks to the uprisings of the Arab Spring On first reflection just having finished the book I thought the story structure too pat too familiar ragtag kids find common cause and form a team each with herhis own uniue set of talents early actions organized missions hubris and internal strife actions that went too far or fell apart as the team disintegrated and the wistful nostalgia of members post Events We've all seen this movie Yet that clean arc belies the real breadth of the history captured by Olson In particular she's expert at the expository aside contextualizing 4chan while describing its birth for instance and the skeleton of the book's plot is a very very smart way to give shape to all this information Olson also had amazing access to many of the central players who were um anonymous and generally derisive of outsider interest Thus her history is richly detailed yet also widescreen than any I'd seen before Her insights are generous yet rigorously critical her accomplished account of who these folks are and how they worked is complemented by nuanced assessments of motive philosophyAt times I wished for less and then and so what I wanted a book expansively engaged with the cultural study of the prankerhacker subculture and with the intersections of politics and pranks But it's unfair to wish the book was everything when it already so damn good on its own terms I still think it's a little over stuffed with detail too bound by its own structural focus on chronology But these are minor uibblesThat's why I picked it up though I'm fascinated by a fan of pranks the disruptive energies of rule breaking from the pettiest acts of childish disruption to the important stuff that gets the moralfags all hot and bothered I'm interested in rule breaking And one of the things that fascinates me about 4chan or Reddit or Anonymous Lulzsec or predecessors like Alan Abel Andy Kaufman Sasha Baron Cohen and the Yes Men is the way the prank's unexpected intrusion into public spaces reveals in disregarding all those social conventions we implicitly or explicitly demand allegiance to The prankster comes along and may just fart in church or may come in all dressed in her Sunday best sitting down in the pew paying careful attention to the service before say mid sermon laughing loudly and freuently Maintaining a perfect face of reflection and engagement she's really paying attention to the preacher but not responding the way we're supposed to Events like this make us uncomfortable they violate the social contract governing behavior And that's where I get so excited by intruding on and disrupting the oft unexamined or intensely protected rituals of acceptable behavior the prank provokes some reflection on those behaviors and that unexamined ethical code Often the response is intensified policing of those behaviors The response to Assange and Anonymous illustrates this to a T eh? But there's an opportunity for subversion there an opportunity when the rules aren't simply behind the scenes but are made visible to imagine some other way of behaving with one another A cheap sociologist's way to experience this walk on to an elevator and stand facing the wrong side Or sit in a public


About the Author: Parmy Olson

Parmy Olson is a journalist Anonymous Inside PDF/EPUB Â for Forbes magazine known for her work on the hacktivist movement Anonymous She describes herself as covering 'agitators and innovators in mobile' Early in her career with Forbes magzzine she wrote a series of articles about the subprime mortgage crisis Parmy also served as the London bureau chief for Forbes from – before transitioning to the magazine's San Fr.



10 thoughts on “We Are Anonymous Inside the Hacker World of LulzSec Anonymous

  1. says:

    I'm going to talk about the book but then I'm going to riff on the subjectOlson's deft narrative of how Anonymous organized out of the chaotic prankishness of 4chan and eventually in some ways obviously fragmented and fell apart is deceptively accomplished The book runs chronologically helping us newbies newfags in the language of this community get a handle on what happened when and where neatly tracking a linear path from early dickishness on discussion boards to a organized ethos against any constraints on internet freedom that aligned sort of with politics from Wikileaks to the uprisings of the Arab Spring On first reflection just having finished the book I thought the story structure too pat too familiar ragtag kids find common cause and form a team each with herhis own uniue set of talents early actions organized missions hubris and internal strife actions that went too far or fell apart as the team disintegrated and the wistful nostalgia of members post Events We've all seen this movie Yet that clean arc belies the real breadth of the history captured by Olson In particular she's expert at the expository aside contextualizing 4chan while describing its birth for instance and the skeleton of the book's plot is a very very smart way to give shape to all this information Olson also had amazing access to many of the central players who were um anonymous and generally derisive of outsider interest Thus her history is richly detailed yet also widescreen than any I'd seen before Her insights are generous yet rigorously critical her accomplished account of who these folks are and how they worked is complemented by nuanced assessments of motive philosophyAt times I wished for less and then and so what I wanted a book expansively engaged with the cultural study of the prankerhacker subculture and with the intersections of politics and pranks But it's unfair to wish the book was everything when it already so damn good on its own terms I still think it's a little over stuffed with detail too bound by its own structural focus on chronology But these are minor uibblesThat's why I picked it up though I'm fascinated by a fan of pranks the disruptive energies of rule breaking from the pettiest acts of childish disruption to the important stuff that gets the moralfags all hot and bothered I'm interested in rule breaking And one of the things that fascinates me about 4chan or Reddit or Anonymous Lulzsec or predecessors like Alan Abel Andy Kaufman Sasha Baron Cohen and the Yes Men is the way the prank's unexpected intrusion into public spaces reveals in disregarding all those social conventions we implicitly or explicitly demand allegiance to The prankster comes along and may just fart in church or may come in all dressed in her Sunday best sitting down in the pew paying careful attention to the service before say mid sermon laughing loudly and freuently Maintaining a perfect face of reflection and engagement she's really paying attention to the preacher but not responding the way we're supposed to Events like this make us uncomfortable they violate the social contract governing behavior And that's where I get so excited by intruding on and disrupting the oft unexamined or intensely protected rituals of acceptable behavior the prank provokes some reflection on those behaviors and that unexamined ethical code Often the response is intensified policing of those behaviors The response to Assange and Anonymous illustrates this to a T eh? But there's an opportunity for subversion there an opportunity when the rules aren't simply behind the scenes but are made visible to imagine some other way of behaving with one another A cheap sociologist's way to experience this walk on to an elevator and stand facing the wrong side Or sit in a public bathroom stall and try to strike up conversations with people in the next stall Jimmy Kimmel had a wonderful bit where he offered the guy in the stall next door a plate of browniesBut what I love about the prank is what's dangerous about it The prankster isn't standing outside throwing stones they're in the mix and subject to conseuences Further the subversion is not necessarily driven by moral purpose or at least one can't bank on the moral outcomes The problem with rule breaking like this is that all rules go up in the air We could stop here and address the 4chan love of the fag tag Newbies to the board were newfags; folks in Anonymous who stopped aiming just for Lulz the meancynical bellylaugh of the jackass and started thinking about purpose and politics were moralfags Clearly this nomenclature emerges from a foundational homophobia and a pervasive bullying on the 4chan boards Yet the usage became a neat tool for driving away the prudes join in the game or take your scolds somewhere else And the new usages perhaps attained new semantic functions in the community; the external rules of culture were rewritten inside the chatroom And as Olson carefully and intriguingly defines in a thread throughout We Are Anonymous there was an inclusivity to gender and sexual fluidity in these spaces The breaking of that cultural rule don't say the word fag is not mere subversion nor simple bullying It's a lot fucking interesting and to my mind suggestive of why breaking rules matters so much Adherence to rules is often a way NOT to think about the messiness of our values Don't say 'fag' allows us to cover up act like homophobia intensely policed gender behaviors and the limits of our cultural understandings of gender and sexual identity the neat binaries we normalize are not always on the table or in the room The downside is obvious the breaking of the rule might be a vicious overt attempt to maintain other rules This is at the heart of the problem of the prank Sometimes you're being a lovable jackass; sometimes you're an assholeWe might turn this around on Goodreads culture and maybe the recent kerfuffle about the bullying of authors the site's attempts to define and control behaviors and image 4chan had no real constraints on how people behaved or what people could post And I think this improvisatory play is 'organic' to social media community; anything goes and the rules such as they are form and constantly reform depending on what the mass of users will accept It leads to a constant rule breaking and setting Goodreads like lots of social networking sites is constantly grappling with this tendency for open conversation to evolve through bouts of jackassery and assholishness Reviewers here aren't bound by some of the constraints imposed by newspapers or print sources we can let it rip We might be profane might be cruelly or crudely derisive of the themestopics or the non existent aesthetics might call the author names What kind of misogynistic asshole wrote this? We can write reviews that ignore the book entirely and just throw mud Authors could pipe up and throw mud back or game the system what rules? I'll get my ratings by making up profiles or go out on the internet and start attacking the attackers If we were 4chan we'd just ride the waves of anger and counter move and eventually rules would shake out I think that on a social networking site largely driven by readers the assholish writers trying to control how people write or talk about their works would have their asses handed to them And ought to But my point is I would be fine with letting the shitstorm rage If there appears to be a user behaving in a way that other users find inappropriate I think the visceral response is just fine For example trolls will troll and will usually spark mobs of fire wielding friends to attack I wouldn't censor trolls I'd assume the mob will get 'em But mobs are dangerous too right? I wouldn't censor mobs either but things can get uncomfortable A while back some eons ago in internet time another kerfuffle on GR was about reviews that attacked the problems of predatory behavior on sites like this Some felt like the mob had gone vigilante I felt still do that the internet runs on different rules And part of the pleasure and pain of playing on a site like this is the discomfort of figuring out what rulesvalues matter to me and how do I fit in andI understand why GR wouldn't want to have 4chan as a business model It's a difficult thing trying to figure out rules to shape social network behaviors and it's damned interesting to watch problems blow up and then seeing how the community and the overlords try to make sense of and then structure behaviors accordingly But the place Goodreads but also this broader new world of a networked community demands new ways of thinking about our values and how behaviors get policed And for that reason the bully debate is wonderful if painful And I'll delight in coming upon the next prank whether neat jackassed air horning or assholish prowling that disturbs the community here Delight in the most complicated sense relishing its worth and value even if I feel outraged or aggrieved or hurt


  2. says:

    Mr Robot this isn't Another crucial book for understanding the modern era we live in a fascinating tale of the hackers much of whom would be classified as just evil trolls than activist brilliant computer experts although there are plenty of the latter as well The story spans from the beginnings with 4chan to the loosely organized thing that is Anonymous which is not uite what most people assume Much of the book is also about LulzSec which others criticize but perhaps the best way for author Parmy Olson to have researched such a book is by way of public knowledge after all the arrests and everything I found it a fascinating expose by focusing on those colorful characters even if not a complete overview of everything hacktavist Sabu Topiary and Kayla herself don't always come out looking like aspirational figures but it cannot be denied that they are truly intriguing characters So if you're not already an expert do read up and learn about imageboards and social engineering and DDoSing and it might just be helpful to know one day


  3. says:

    We Are Anonymous Inside the Hacker World of LulzSec Anonymous and the Global Cyber Insurgency is a book that is compelling and hard to put down I have been using the Internet since before the emergence of the World Wide Web Like many others I use social media and enjoy the convenience and connection to information and other resources that the Internet makes possible Author Parmy Olson details the many harmful things that are also made possibleThe book's main theme focuses on the activities of a loosely organized and changing online community of hackers known to the public as Anonymous and on a smaller subset of six that form LulzSec The author details how the group formed and paints fascinating portraits of a very diverse set of personalitiesThe book for me also raises a plethora of issues related to society as a whole While the acts of the hackers are certainly criminal and do considerable harm to companies and individuals the book also raises uestions about the role and possible culpability of companies media and even government Many of the systems hacked into appear carelessly vulnerable The media with a few exceptions appear gullible and predisposed to the disinformation fed to them by the hackers At one point when a member of LulzSec is located by the FBI and decides to cooperate the book suggests that the law law enforcement agency stands by while a company called Stratfor is hacked into in the interests of locating and arresting the other members of the group This raises the uestion whether there is a definitional component to notions of criminality Is a warrantless wiretap or ignoring a crime in progress any less culpable than the actions of the hackers?For many years I have cautioned friends and colleagues to pay attention to online security The responses have generally been dismissive Some have uestioned why anyone would care about their online activity The book provides an object lesson in exactly why they should care Descriptions in the book of how easily Twitter and Facebook accounts are hacked or mention of rogue Facebook applications should reinforce my point We are Anonymous is a book that anyone which means most of us who is on the Internet should read Murdo Morrison


  4. says:

    The true crime section is an interesting read if you know at least a little bit about ainternet culture banonymouslulzsec and chackology You don't have to be an expert it's probably better if you aren't experts may get bored in the explanations The evolution of the hivemind is an interesting thing to watch as are the normal human protective behaviors that tend to remain in the individuals even when they are immersed in it at least in SOME individuals I'm sure in the future we will suss out the difference between hivemind individuals and hivemind absorbeesOlson does devote an inordinate amount of time to the blow by blow of the events but she does at least give a nod at the end to the continuing culture and its singular nonidentity The fact that Anonymous is not really any one set of people or ideals is important to realize The fickleness of the internet based identities is real and not based on any moral code One day fighting for justice the next exposing some poor saps address for no good reason other than some asshole put them up on 4chan as a target The chaotic neutral aspect of the hivemind speaks volumes of the human race as a whole this is who we are this IS reflective of our history and indicative of our future unless we decide otherwise Otherwise an interesting read for those of us who knew bits but not the whole story of Sabu and the whys and wherefores of who did what to who There are many unanswered uestions but at least you'll come away knowing you really should change your passwords regularly


  5. says:

    Attended an IT conference today and one of the first speakers talked about the credit card hack on target and how it caused target to shift gears from developing what is cool for the consumer to redefining it's most critical programs to focus on credit card thieves Wow this just after finishing the book a couple days early So how does this relate to this book Will write that at the endFirst I have to say WOW a truly enjoyable book and a great history of how Anonymous came to be It brought back a lot of old memories of hanging out in IRC chat rooms back in the early 90's yes they existed back then with clients like MIRC and others never to the extreme of these folks and never in AOL rooms Thanks Parmy for delivering how Anonymous came to be how it fought among itself to find the right voice as well as how they went about their hacks Working in IT mostly the project side and not the technical side for several years I would hear about sites that were hacked what our company was doing about it etc Never did I think about the devious ways that hacks have gotten into systems nor how they even discover these bugs in the first place Yes Anonymous would expose several sites online and yes I think there is a positive side to calling out the companies that have been lying to consumers Some of the hacks however seem to be from foreign governments etc and my curiosity is what we are doing about it Seems like Anonymous is global from the book and the like to find vulnerable sites to rile up the folks Have they ever tried however to hack the hackers in foreign lands? Maybe there is a way to have Anonymous help folks by exposing those folks and what they've gotten away with As for credit cards and other hacks The social engineering side of this book was great Not only did it raise an eyebrow or two when it was covered but I next went out and started deleting some FB connections that seemed out of place So tie that to tonight Great 1st episode of the final season of Persons of interest An old AI is resurrected in the end to begin the fight back The concept of hacking comes up and malware Listening to this it's almost like Anonymous could be the cause yes I know it's not but how they described the malware in the firmware etc ones got to think maybe this already occurred Wrapping this back to Target and knowing no one is probably reading down this far in my diatribe of ramblings During my meeting today cyber security came up several times and I found myself recommending Yes than 5 times to some folks that were talking about this topic At the end of the day I wound up talking with the keynote about White and Black hackers and their purposes and I freaking knew what I was talking about all from this book and all from the correlated learning throughout the day Sorry I can't give it a 5 but it's a very very high 4 if I could score it that way Not sure if Parmy Olson the author would read this but if it is read I'd just like to say thanks for showing me this world the crap I need to do better at home etcfin


  6. says:

    it's like a whole book of he said she said relayed third hand by somebody who is not a native speaker of the languagei get that it's probably really really difficult to pin down anybody from Anonymous it's not like you can insist like a six year old on a playground that they prove it and i believe that this author really did do the best due diligence possible given the subjects and the fact that they take great joy in pranking people but by virtue of the medium the interwebs and the people involved this sense of creeping dubiousness spreads slowly through the book until about halfway through you begin to wonder whether any of what you've read is really truebtw i think the global cyber insurgency and a lot of other rhetoric in this book is wildly overblown it's almost like talking about a gang of pre teens egging cars as terrorists not that Anonymous are just skill free irritants but that they are nowhere near organized enough to be insurgents they also haven't one agenda they also haven't a specified target etc etc and taking down a web site is not anywhere near as terrifying as launching an RPG into a McDonald'sso no not terrorists not verifiable in the end this book sort of reminds me of those old advertisements about the demon marijuana one puff of which will slide you into heroin way way overblown


  7. says:

    Well written in the face of disinformation secrets and outright lies Double and triple fact checking probably didn't cut much ice here and Olson did a creditable job of ferreting out what seems to be a coherent narrative The journalism is solid the authorial voice very engaging I'm deeply sympathetic to hackers and this book didn't dissuade me one bit Yeah they do some harm it's undeniable But when they are taking down banks and evil corporations I'm right up there cheering them on so who am I to castigate them for their other nefarious actions? I enjoyed the ripped from the headlines aspect of this book and I dug getting to feel like I was however briefly on the inside I'm in their corner with my knee jerk anti authority bias intact


  8. says:

    Fascinating look at the world of Anonymous I learned many lessons from this 1 Anonymous is not really a group at least not one with a hierarchy 2 Most people in Anonymous have average or slightly above average computer skills these are called script kiddies 3 Those that have great computer skills are revered but they're not leaders 4 Several of the attacks that the group has carried out weren't political but done for the lulz embarrassing someone else publicly for fun 5 Most big companies employ only the most basic of security measures on the Web 6 You never know when you're attracting the attention of someone who hates you 7 Each level of security you employ increases your chances of outstripping a hacker's attention span You may never reach 100% but many people who spend the vast majority of their time online have short attention spans and get bored easily So the goal of your online security isn't just to outsmart the smartest guy in Anonymous it's to outlive his attention span The saying There are no girls on the Internet in this case is true The VAST majority of hackers are male You never know who is watching and you probably wouldn't know whether someone has broken into your accounts until they MAKE it known Someone could watch you for months amassing a file and eventually publish it for the sole purpose of embarrassing you 8 Several in Anonymous who thought they were truly anonymous got a harsh lesson when the roles were reversed and it turned out the FBI and European authorities were watching Three key players were arrested One was arrested months before the others and was uickly turned into an informant 9 Many of the memes saying and culture of the Internet originated with Anonymous and hacker culture 10 Anonymous is not your friend Almost any political intent is something you read into it If it gets a chance to embarrass a person or an entity it will And that someone could be you It's sort of a faceless version of the Joker from Nolan's version of Batman Some men just want to watch the world burn


  9. says:

    A difficult task writing this even harder getting it out so uickly but given the interviews with Jake Davis and some of the other insights it has to be read if you're interested in this subject You'd think perhaps a anarchic and less journalistic stlye like Jake's own style may be better suited to this story which is not about Anonymous and also not about the Global Cyber Insurgency but for a general reader I think it's pretty goodA full on warts and all review can be read here


  10. says:

    Solid work of journalism Extraordinary access to the major players of LulzSec I was reading this for research expecting to dip in and out but ended up reading it all the way through because if the compelling human interest here One uibble with the subtitle global cyber insurgency is misleading The individuals profiled here are all from the US and the UK Excellent and highly recommended


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *