(Oil! Author Upton Sinclair) [E–book] ò Upton Sinclair


Oil is one of my favorite American novels because Sinclair was fascinated and bewildered by the beginnings of mass consumer culture here in the US and his descriptions here of oil rigs cars radios jazz music and Hollywood are very perceptive and eye opening Sinclair knew that we were losing something of ourselves as we bought into high convenience but at the same time he loved driving fast on the newly paved hills of Southern California The opening chapter is a tour de force description of taking a 50 mph drive in those early days If you like to try to imagine what life was like back then the details throughout the novel are invaluable If you like true to life characters wel Upton Sinclair drank my milkshakehe drank it up I thought I was oing to read a book about the oil industry in California circa 1920 but ended up with a book about World Communism Oh well at least it was interesting Sinclair wrote with the fervent energy of a true believer but the entire time I read the book I approached it with the perspective of history in mind History has basically shown Sinclair and those who subscribed to his idealistic view of the workers to be wrong The camps that he describes for basically a Imagine That! good Socialist society at the end of the book were tried withreat success The problem is the Nazis and Stalin were the ones that pulled it off This book was written in 1927 and has nothing but praise for the Soviets claiming that the only reason we heard bad things on this side of the Atlantic was because of jingoistic journalism that was manipulated by the power brokers Again history shows this to be categorically untrue especially when Lenin himself referred to people like Sinclair as useful idiotsAnd the worst part is I can forgive the weak writing style in favor of The Jungle will always be Sinclair s most acclaimed work and rightly so Elena's Conquest given its impact but I believe that Oil has just as much relevance to contemporary life if not so and deserves to be as well known as its venerable sibling even if it did not spur the same reforms of the oil industry that The Jungle did for food preparation and handling I was spurred to read it after a rewatch of Paul Thomas Anderson s There Will Be Blood and the novel is so different from and complex than the film adaptation that they probably should not be considered strictly related Anderson s film is a small close study with Daniel Day Lewis oil tycoon patriarch a cryptic amoral madman whereas Sinclair s sprawling epic of ambition and capitalism has the son as its vastly subtler and complex protagonist arguing for and against several political philosophies against the backdrop of World War 1 the Teapot Dome scandal evangelical religious revivalism the film industry and theenerally explosive rowth of Southern California As always with books vs movie uestions one should decide how much the snappier running time and enhanced aesthetic experience of a film outweighs the greater richness and depth of a novel but there is so much reat stuff in richness and depth of a novel but there is so much King Alfred's Version of St. Augustine's Soliloquies great stuff in that isn t the film that it deserves to be experienced as its own masterwork particularly its exploration of how internal leftist debates interact with public opinion and the forces of big businessIn fairness to Anderson ones of Sinclair s weaknesses as an author is that it can be difficult to tell his digressions from his details which is probably why the movie really only uses the plot from about the first 100 pages and then does its own thing The very first chapter is a lengthy floridly overwritten dramatization of J Arnold Ross Sr and Jr driving into California to investigate some oil leases but the story picks up rapidly and Senior a small time oilman beginsradually making it big through smart investments and some cunning He s a tough negotiator and not averse to Rescuing Gus greasing the palms of public officials when necessary but he s not at all like his movie depiction he s always fair to his workers andenerally supportive though skeptical of his son s ideological meanderings His son nicknamed Bunny is the real main character and over the course of the book he loyally defends his father s line of work to the various leftists and socialists he encounters as he Class of 92: Out of Our League gets continually and involved in the world of radical politics especially after he meets Paul Watkins a tough minded worker and his brother Eli a religious charlatan both played by Paul Dano in the movie Like anyood class traitor Bunny feels uilty about the increasing wealth and privilege he accumulates as his father s business continues to expand but that Doesn T Stop Him From Dating Actresses t stop him from dating actresses reluctantly enjoying the F Scott Fitzgerald high society lifestyle while at the same time attempting to use his wealth for ood Eventually the brutal repression of socialists and anarchists after World War 1 in the Palmer Raids leads to Paul s being beaten to death at the hands of the authorities and the novel ends with a solemn resignation at the unstoppable power of the impersonal capitalist juggernautWhat s interesting is that the novel is for the most part uite nuanced and almost sympathetic in its explorations of industry and power The Jungle written 20 years before was much stridently anti capitalist but Oil portrays the the struggle between large businesses and small for market share with real enthusiasm and Sinclair openly admires the mix of How the West Was Lost: Fifty Years of Economic Folly--and the Stark Choices Ahead guile dedication and vision it takes for an entrepreneur torow from a small operator to a major political player Ross and his operation in Beach City is an only barely fictionalized depiction of the real life Edward Doheny s development of Hunti. In Oil Upton Sinclair fashioned a novel out of the oil scandals of the Harding administration providing in the process a detailed picture of the development of the oil industry in Southern California

Oil! Author Upton Sinclair

Upton Sinclair ¸ 9 Read

Eviewers here I also read this book after seeing There Will Be Blood Enough has been said about the differences between the novel and the film so there s no need for me to chime in on that topicSinclair definitely knows how to tell a story The opening pages narrating Bunny s and Dad s high speed drive through the hills of California en route to an oil lease signing rabbed me and kept me turning the pages It wasn t until about half to three uarters of the way through the novel that the narrative turned towards a debate between socialism and communism with some sprinklings of narrative that echoed the feel of the first half of the novel Overall I enjoyed it and have recommended it to several of my friends who still believe in reading booksA couple of my impressions of the novelWhile the oil industry and associated overnment corruption were portrayed in a damning light I was surprised at how the majority of the main characters were portrayed in a balanced human way except for one particular character I felt no one was portrayed as an extreme angel or villain Being a muckraker I had expected Sinclair to portray Dad as a sinister fat cat oil baron rather than someone who was taking actions simply because that s how things were done in the oil industry whether he agreed with them or not In fact Dad is the little uy who is to a large extent at the mercy of the large oil concerns who are really setting the rules of the ameThe latter half of the book ets bogged down in what seems to be a comparison between socialism and communism Although propaganda at the time was trying to paint him as a communist it seemed to me that he was firmly planted in the socialist camp though not 100% committed despite his real life work with the Socialist Party He constantly brings up the violent aspects of he Bolshevik movement in the States and in Europe but never to the degree of total condemnation Bunny s constant inner conflict over which camp was the right one for him left me with the strong impression that this inner conflict was a direct mirror of Sinclair s frame of mind at the time and writing this section of the book was his way of weighing both ideologies and working things out for himself This novel paired with Ayn Rand s Atlas Shrugged would create a reat opportunity for discussion in a lit course or book Fallen Angel: The Passion of Fausto Coppi group There Will Be Blood is LOOSELY based on this book that is to say there is oil drilling in each and there s a creepy charlatan for a religious leader but that s about it The first half of this book was excellent andives a real explanation of how oil drilling worked at the turn of the century The second half of the book is really about socialism as the main character the son of the oil man struggles between the reedy wealth of his father and his belief in worker s rights I found the second half of the book to be tiresome and to put it bluntly boring and repetitive I d have to say I MADE myself finish it The book could be considered timeless in the fact that it parallels modern society of the corrupt rich be considered timeless in the fact that it parallels modern society of the corrupt rich control our political machine to cater to their needs but it would have been much better served had they cut 100 pages out of the 2nd half of the book I didn t see the movie And I had low expectations for Sinclair s work as he s regarded as prolix and melodramatic but this is ood surprisingly Alien Alpha good absorbing enough to make me ignore my surroundings and nearly miss my train stop While I m only a third of the way into the book it is something of a War and Peace set in Southern California It s the story of Bunny Ross a boy who follows his father J Andrew Ross one of the successful independent oil men a self made man Their lives are intertwined with the Wyatt family a family of fundamentalist sheepherders whose black sheep Paul is a freethinking pro worker that Bunny idolizes Like War and Peace the characters lives are shaped by forces beyond their control such as war revolution and unions And like Tolstoy Sinclair strives to make every decision and thought of his protagonist over the length of his life open to the readers Yes Sinclair strives to advance his thoughts on socialism but I didn t find it any overbearing than Tolstoy s interpretation of the invasion of Russia and Tolstoy s not so subtle push for finding GodEdit I ve since seen the movie I can see that seeing it would detract from reading as the movie s adaption is a very different beast Now that I have finished reading the book I have to deduct a star It s aood book It was a reat book but it is about 100 pages too long It does turn into a bit of an unrealistic full throated discussion about communism vs socialism Since neither have relevance in the US today it s an unfortunate turn in the book Still there are a lot of things that make this story contemporary and I m still struck by how little some things have changed from the 20s Overall a pretty interesting book focused on the period of American history from the outbreak of World War I to the end of the Harding administration particularly in relation to the Red Scare and the labor movement Sinclair s ideological slant particularly in relation to the Red Scare and the labor movement Sinclair s ideological slant at times painfully naive does lend freshness when the characters encounter actual historical events they aren t the usual ones His characters rarely rise above the level of propaganda but Sinclair has a ift for storytelling that makes the story work Dull preachy expositions are balanced by occasional bursts of true elouence such as a beautifully written death scene juxtaposed with a post election party I didn t love this book but I found it interesting well worth a first read. Field workers and socialist organizers fuels a running debate with his father Senators small investors oil magnates a Hollywood film star and a crusading evangelist people the pages of this lively nove. Ngton Beach in Orange County and Sinclair s melancholy illustration of all levels of overnment as corrupt feckless and reactionary fits into a long tradition of California as American microcosm like in Chinatown Who Framed Roger Rabbit etc At various points Bunny attempts to stand up to Vernon Roscoe his father s much ruthless business partner and the bad cop of capitalism to his father s ood cop and Roscoe s powerful defenses of the inexorable logic of capitalism are right in line with the famous monologues in Wall Street Other People s Money etc By the end of the book the triumph of capitalism is taken as practically unavoidable but at many points the characters are iven room to portray this as an actual ood thing which Sinclair did not do in The Jungle The oil industry has many casualties over the course of the novel but Sinclair leaves it up to the reader to picture what if anything would change under a socialist system With the hindsight of a hundred years we can see that real life socialist countries don t seem to have discovered a clearly superior method for resource extraction but that doesn t make the imperial cruelty of the oil barons at the incredibly modest demands of the workers for simple wage increases any easier to swallowIt s notable that all of the radicals Bunny encounters are well meaning but ultimately doomed whether by pointless factionalism naivete or overnment hostility via strike breaking and state sanctioned brutality Sinclair spends a ood deal of time on how the cannibalistic disputes between the various flavors of socialists communists anarchists and leftists were unavoidable but ultimately meaningless as the real powers operated with impunity on a plane far above them and one does not have to think very hard to see how the euivalent forces of oligarchy ensure that the same system operates today I was reminded of Steinbeck s In Dubious Battle set a decade later and how how liberal reformers in the FDR administration defused much of this kind of radical pressure with pro union policy as part of the New Deal but Sinclair can t bring himself to write anything close to the redemptive ending that Steinbeck was so fond of and Paul s ultimate death at the hands of an anti union Beautiful Ghosts goon suad is nothing but a fatalistic reminder of the power of uncheckedreed Even worse Eli is able to cynically use his brother s death to advance his immense evangelist movement making one long for the violent comeuppance Anderson Alexandra, Gone gave him in the film And even though Bunny and his new wife Rachel dedicate his inheritance to establishing institutions of reform Sinclair doesn t have any illusions that they will matterreatly all of the antagonists and even Bunny s father not only escape any conseuences for their corruption in the Teapot Dome scandal they successfully install Coolidge as president in a landslideSince this is historical fiction it s easy to take the loomy irrelevance of the american socialist movement as inevitable though the American socialist movement as inevitable though is curious that Eugene Debs surprisingly successful campaigns for president GO UNMENTIONED DURING THE DISCUSSIONS ABOUT unmentioned during the discussions about viability of electoralism I think the book raises a lot of excellent uestions about how leftists should proceed when history is in motion It oes without saying that none of the warmongering nativist plutocratic petroleum obsessed reactionary impulses on display in the novel have left the American political landscape yet it remains to be seen whether the current Resurgence Of Socialism In of socialism in US is authentic or permanent Oil vastly improves on There Will Be Blood in its understand of how systems are far powerful than individual men and women and though Sinclair s own experience with electoral politics he ran for F. Scott Fitzgerald governor of California less than a decade after Oil was published and was crushed does not provide a particularly inspiring example of how to challenge entrenched interests perhaps now that evenreater challenges like climate change are no longer uite so ignorable a politics of kindness will be successful now than it was back in his era You know I didn t love this one as much as Sinclair s The Jungle Perhaps because I think so incredibly highly of The Jungle my expectations for this one were a little unrealistic Let me put it this way In job interviews when I m asked to name a hero I always list Upton Sinclair and Rachel Carson because they both manage to be artful moving emotional artists while also writing with an iron pen and changing the world with words on a page But here the characters are not uite so compelling as in The Jungle the Oil is not The Jungle but it s damn close In keeping with the politically minded storyteller s way of using a fictional narrative to drive home a point Sinclair has this time chosen a California oil baron and his idealistic son as the vehicles with which to air his own beliefs about corporate corruption and The Devil Hath Been Raised: A Documentary History of the Salem Village Witchcraft Outbreak of March 1692; Together With a Collection of Newly Located and Gathered Witchcraft Documents greed Being a dutiful journalist Sinclair does his best to show both sides of the storyiving examples of how big business doesn t only rape the land but also keeps the common man employed etc He even spends a ood deal of time displaying in a very Fitzgerald esue way the carefree lifestyle led by the foppish son and daughter heirs to oil fortune But make no mistake about it Sinclair was always on the working man s sideThe movie There Will Be Blood is based on this book but the two are uite different I love Daniel Day Lewis maniacal tyrant but he s a murderous loon compared to the character from Oil The book is politics and people The movie is about a personone crazy ass person Like many of the other Ribery of public officials class warfare and international rivalry over oil production are the context for Sinclair's story of a enial independent oil developer and his son whose sympathy with the oil. ,


10 thoughts on “(Oil! Author Upton Sinclair) [E–book] ò Upton Sinclair

  1. says: (Oil! Author Upton Sinclair) [E–book] ò Upton Sinclair

    (Oil! Author Upton Sinclair) [E–book] ò Upton Sinclair Oil is one of my favorite American novels because Sinclair was fascinated and bewildered by the beginnings of mass consumer culture here in the

  2. says: (Oil! Author Upton Sinclair) [E–book] ò Upton Sinclair

    (Oil! Author Upton Sinclair) [E–book] ò Upton Sinclair Oil is not The Jungle but it's damn close In keeping with the politically minded storyteller's way of using a fictional narrative to drive home a point Sinclair has this time chosen a California oil baron and his

  3. says: (Oil! Author Upton Sinclair) [E–book] ò Upton Sinclair

    (Oil! Author Upton Sinclair) [E–book] ò Upton Sinclair Upton Sinclair drank my milkshakehe drank it up I thought I was going to read a book about the oil industry in California circa 1920 but ended up with a book about World Communism Oh well at least it was interesting

  4. says: (Oil! Author Upton Sinclair) [E–book] ò Upton Sinclair

    (Oil! Author Upton Sinclair) [E–book] ò Upton Sinclair Free download Oil! Author Upton Sinclair Like many of the other reviewers here I also read this book after seeing There Will Be Blood Enough has been said about the differences between the novel and the film so there's no need for me to chime in on that topicSinclair definitely knows how to tell a story The opening pages narrating Bunny's and Dad's high speed drive through the hills

  5. says: Free download Oil! Author Upton Sinclair (Oil! Author Upton Sinclair) [E–book] ò Upton Sinclair

    Characters ê E-book, or Kindle E-pub ¸ Upton Sinclair (Oil! Author Upton Sinclair) [E–book] ò Upton Sinclair Upton Sinclair ¸ 9 Read Sinclair wrote with the fervent energy of a true believer but the entire time I read the book I approached it with the perspective of history in mind History has basically shown Sinclair and those who subscribed to his idealistic view of the workers to be wrong The camps that he describes for basically a good Socialist so

  6. says: Characters ê E-book, or Kindle E-pub ¸ Upton Sinclair (Oil! Author Upton Sinclair) [E–book] ò Upton Sinclair Upton Sinclair ¸ 9 Read

    (Oil! Author Upton Sinclair) [E–book] ò Upton Sinclair 'There Will Be Blood' is LOOSELY based on this book; that is to say there is oil drilling in each and there's a creepy charlatan for a religiou

  7. says: (Oil! Author Upton Sinclair) [E–book] ò Upton Sinclair

    Characters ê E-book, or Kindle E-pub ¸ Upton Sinclair Upton Sinclair ¸ 9 Read (Oil! Author Upton Sinclair) [E–book] ò Upton Sinclair The Jungle will always be Sinclair's most acclaimed work and rightly so given its impact but I believe that Oil has just as much relevance to contemporary life if not so and deserves to be as well known as its venerable sibling even if it did not spur the same reforms of the oil industry that The Jungle did for food preparation and handling I was spurred to read it after a rewatch of Paul Thomas Anderson's There Will Be Blood a

  8. says: Characters ê E-book, or Kindle E-pub ¸ Upton Sinclair Upton Sinclair ¸ 9 Read Free download Oil! Author Upton Sinclair

    (Oil! Author Upton Sinclair) [E–book] ò Upton Sinclair Characters ê E-book, or Kindle E-pub ¸ Upton Sinclair I didn't see the movie And I had low expectations for Sinclair's work as he's regarded as prolix and melodramatic but this is good surprisingly

  9. says: (Oil! Author Upton Sinclair) [E–book] ò Upton Sinclair

    Free download Oil! Author Upton Sinclair (Oil! Author Upton Sinclair) [E–book] ò Upton Sinclair Characters ê E-book, or Kindle E-pub ¸ Upton Sinclair You know I didn't love this one as much as Sinclair's The Jungle Perhaps because I think so incredibly highly of The Jungle my expectations for this one were a little unrealistic Let me put it this way In job interviews when I'm asked to name a hero I always list Upton Sinclair and Rachel Carson because they both manage

  10. says: (Oil! Author Upton Sinclair) [E–book] ò Upton Sinclair

    (Oil! Author Upton Sinclair) [E–book] ò Upton Sinclair Overall a pretty interesting book focused on the period of American history from the outbreak of World War I to the end of the Harding administration particularly in relation to the Red Scare and the labor movement Sinclair's ideological slant though at times painfully naive does lend freshness; when the charact

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